fbpx

Loading. Please wait.

PHONE: (973) 627-7888 OPENING HOURS: MONDAY-FRIDAY 9:00am-7:00pm, SATURDAY 9:00am-1:00pm

Acupuncture in Madison, NJ

Let's Talk!

Discover Long-Lasting Pain Relief with Acupuncture Treatments from Denville Medical

At Denville Medical, we aim to serve you with long-lasting quality of life through personalized acupuncture treatments in New Jersey. The path to a pain-free life begins with a friendly, informative appointment, where one of our doctors develops a customized treatment plan tailored to your body's needs. It starts with your first evaluation, where our experts learn about your medical history, diagnostic tests, current condition, and overall health goals. From there, we'll create your plan and help you hit your milestones until your quality of life is improved.

With treatments like needling, cupping, Gua Sha, and acupuncture in Madison, NJ, included in your scope of treatment, musculoskeletal relief is right around the corner.

If you're sick and tired of living with painful limitations, our doctors are here to help you live a normal life free of debilitating body issues. No surgery. No addictive medicine. Only comprehensive acupuncture treatments, crafted with health and happiness in mind.

Physical-therapy-phone-number 973-627-7888

Request a Consultation

Latest News in Madison, NJ

Climate Goals Proposed for Madison; "To care about climate change you only need to be one thing, and that's a person living on planet Earth who wants a better future

MADISON, NJ - In speaking about Madison's Climate Action goals, Madison council woman Rachel Ehrlich stated that currently states, including New Jersey have an opportunity to implement and build upon the federal climate action of 2022."It's now up to the American people how much the federal government invests in our clean future", said Ehrlich. "The solutions to climate change require cooperative work at all levels from local energy transition to national policies to international agreements"Madison committe...

MADISON, NJ - In speaking about Madison's Climate Action goals, Madison council woman Rachel Ehrlich stated that currently states, including New Jersey have an opportunity to implement and build upon the federal climate action of 2022.

"It's now up to the American people how much the federal government invests in our clean future", said Ehrlich. "The solutions to climate change require cooperative work at all levels from local energy transition to national policies to international agreements"

Madison committed to acting on climate change in January 2022 with the adoption of Resolution 38 which aims to reduce greenhouse gases, increase resiliency in our communities, support state goals and pilot a Climate Action Process. The town's Climate Action Committee proposed action the Borough can take to meet climate goals within the next 12-18 months and also long term climate goals.

Sign Up for FREE Madison Newsletter

"To care about climate change you only need to be one thing, and that's a person living on planet Earth who wants a better future", said Ehrlich.

According to Ehrlich, Madison's long term goals are derived from NJ state goals. Madison's goal is to decrease the borough's total carbon footprint by 80% or from 140,000 tons of carbon dioxide in 2018 to 28,000 tons by 2050. Within those goals are 2 for transportation, 4 for energy supply and one for building energy.

Transportation Goals

Currently, there are 300 plug in electric vehicles in Madison, Ehrlich stated. Those numbers she said are from the current NJDEP registration data.

Energy Goals

Building Energy Goals

Resiliency Goals

The Climate Action Report recommends adopting the 12 energy and resiliency goals to for a 30-year path aligning Madison with NJ state climate goals to reduce emissions and to implement a Climate Action Process which is an annual measurement and reporting process to gauge progress and propose actions to meet goals.

Some recommendations from the action committee include: resolve to stop buying gas powered non emergency light duty vehicle and replace existing fleet vehicles with PEV's. Implement an energy efficiency outreach campaign, when heating, air conditioning and hot water systems need replacing, replace with high efficiency heat pump equipment and adopt a water conservation ordinance.

What's next? On February 13, a discussion of the recommendations will take place. There will be a vote to adopt the Climate Coals and Climate Action Process. A committee will be formed to compile 2023 climate data, implement recommended actions and develop recommendations for 2024. Help other towns adopt a climate process

During the public comment section of Monday's Council meeting, four residents spoke in favor of supporting Madison's Climate Action Plan. No one spoke against the proposed action committee.

One resident applauded Madison for setting an example for other communities. Another resident was happy that Madison will continue to "do what we can to reduce climate disaster".

Ehrlich concluded by stating this is a "30 year framework to guide decision-making with goals that for the most part take us out to 2050. These climate goals form a pathway to 2050 with the framework that will guide us to a safe, healthy and resilient future".

New Bookstore Focused On Climate Change Joins Madison Community

MADISON, NJ — A new bookshop is opening on Main Street, offering the community a variety of seasonal reading as well as books about climate change.The Nature of Reading Bookshop, a virtual bookstore well-known in the community for its pop-up events at local markets, will soon open its first brick-and-mortar location on 22 Main Street.The bookstore is run by Hailey Brock, a Chatham native, who moved back to the area during the pandemic after finishing her studies in the UK."Ever since high school, I had been wo...

MADISON, NJ — A new bookshop is opening on Main Street, offering the community a variety of seasonal reading as well as books about climate change.

The Nature of Reading Bookshop, a virtual bookstore well-known in the community for its pop-up events at local markets, will soon open its first brick-and-mortar location on 22 Main Street.

The bookstore is run by Hailey Brock, a Chatham native, who moved back to the area during the pandemic after finishing her studies in the UK.

"Ever since high school, I had been working at The Chatham Bookseller during my academic breaks, and I became manager for about 18 months when I moved back to New Jersey in 2020. I had long loved the bookselling world, and as I typically focused on medieval history during my academic career, I loved the antiquarian book world especially," Brock said.

While thinking about the next steps in her career, Brock stated that she had long-held interests in both bookselling and a strong desire to play any small role in the ongoing climate crisis, which is how the Nature of Reading Bookshop was born.

Interested in local real estate?Subscribe to Patch's new newsletter to be the first to know about open houses, new listings and more.

"Alongside my bookish interests, for years I had the same climate anxiety that affects so many people, especially in my generation. Until the pandemic, I could barely look at climate news without feeling immeasurably hopeless and depressed," Brock said.

"But as the world pushed through the difficult years of the pandemic and we all adapted and changed so deeply, somehow the existential threat didn't seem as grave anymore. We have the solutions, we just need to work to implement them."

The online bookstore first opened on Earth Day, April 22, 2022, as a niche bookstore specializing in both seasonal reading and climate change books.

Brock defines seasonal reading as using books to better connect with the changing seasons. "Seasonal reading is personal, it's about finding what makes you appreciate the natural world the most, what makes you feel most connected and in tune with the cycles that surround us."

The shop's other focus is climate change books, which include any nonfiction or fiction dealing with the climate crisis.

Although no official grand opening date has been set, Brock expects to be open within the next few months. A crowdfunding campaign has also been launched to help fund the grand opening.

Brock expressed her excitement at the prospect of becoming a member of the Madison business community and bringing her love of reading and dedication to spreading awareness of the climate crisis.

"The pandemic, besides giving me the strength to turn my climate fears into action, likewise made me think: why not now? Owning a bookstore always seemed like a distant dream, but I realized I already had the experience, ideas, and passion to start my own shop, and so I sidestepped the fear and got started," Brock said.

Late Start Calendar Proposal Approved For Madison School District

MADISON, NJ — The Madison Board of Education recently announced that the 2023-2024 school year might begin a little later than in previous years, accommodating the late start calendar that many parents had hoped for.The proposed start date for the upcoming school year is Sept. 5, a week later than the proposed school calendar, which had all students in the district beginning on Aug. 28, 2023.The discussion about changing the school calendar start date began at a December board meeting when several parents spoke out to adv...

MADISON, NJ — The Madison Board of Education recently announced that the 2023-2024 school year might begin a little later than in previous years, accommodating the late start calendar that many parents had hoped for.

The proposed start date for the upcoming school year is Sept. 5, a week later than the proposed school calendar, which had all students in the district beginning on Aug. 28, 2023.

The discussion about changing the school calendar start date began at a December board meeting when several parents spoke out to advocate for a post-Labor Day start, citing how that holiday is an ideal time for family vacations.

"The school calendar is the lifeline for families and planning and plotting child care, transportation, travel, etc. So having the calendar released to us as early as possible is something that is incredibly helpful, and I'm especially celebrating the after-Labor Day start. Thank you for listening and responding to this," resident Katie Zurich said.

On the contrary, two high school students spoke up during the December meeting, stating that they preferred the earlier start time. According to one of the students, they look forward to getting out of school in early June.

Grace Kim, a board member, also commented on this, claiming that keeping students' attention after Memorial Day is already difficult and that extending the school year until the end of June may cause a drop in engagement.

"I just want to be sure that, we, as a district, find ways to keep the children engaged after Memorial Day since we're going to add at least another week or so after that time," Kim said.

Some parents had previously expressed concern that the early start would make it more difficult for working parents to find adequate child care during the weeks when other nearby school districts were still in session.

The board's vice president, Stephen Tindall, however, made the opposite case, contending that the new calendar does not benefit Madison's economically disadvantaged families.

"The changes this year to the calendar were primarily driven in response to the needs of well-to-do students in our school system. I have to point out that economically disadvantaged parents don't get the last week off in August, they don't take their children to the shore that week. The economically disadvantaged students are not looking forward to having summer programs start in the middle of June. I think we need to keep these things in mind," Tindall said.

Beck and Phoenix 2023 tour: Where to buy tickets, schedules, dates

Beck and Phoenix are heading out on tour together this summer.Grammy-winning artist Beck and band Phoenix are heading out on the “Summer Odyssey” tour on Aug. 1 in Seattle, Washington. The tour will wrap up on ...

Beck and Phoenix are heading out on tour together this summer.

Grammy-winning artist Beck and band Phoenix are heading out on the “Summer Odyssey” tour on Aug. 1 in Seattle, Washington. The tour will wrap up on Sep. 10 in Columbia, Maryland.

While on tour, they will make a stop at Madison Square Garden on Sept. 9.

Jenny Lewis, Japanese Breakfast, Weyes Blood and Sir Chloe will rotate as special guests during the tour.

Here is how you can get tickets to see Beck and Phoenix this summer.

Where can I get tickets to see Beck and Phoenix?

Tickets for the “Summer Odyssey” tour go on sale to the public on Jan. 27 on Ticketmaster.

However, tickets also are available on the secondary market.

First-time Vivid Seats users can save $20 on ticket orders over $200 by entering promo code NJ20 at checkout.

You can find all of Beck and Phoenix’s tour dates here.

More massive upcoming tours in 2023

Beck and Phoenix are not the only artists performing at Madison Square Garden this year.

Here are a few more upcoming tours you won’t want to miss.

RELATED STORIES ABOUT LIVE EVENTS:

Nicole Iuzzolino can be reached at [email protected]. Have a tip? Tell us at nj.com/tips.

Central Ave. Development Discussions Continue During Madison Planning Board

Madison, NJ — The Madison Planning Board heard testimony for the third time regarding 3 Central Avenue — one of two complementary proposals for the development of four-story mixed-use buildings in the historic district.Astri Bailie led the meeting as the new chair, taking over the post from Steven Tombalakian.The Board heard testimony from Lisa Ellis, the borough’s director of business development, on existing concerns around parking for future residents of the development. Ellis testified that many available ...

Madison, NJ — The Madison Planning Board heard testimony for the third time regarding 3 Central Avenue — one of two complementary proposals for the development of four-story mixed-use buildings in the historic district.

Astri Bailie led the meeting as the new chair, taking over the post from Steven Tombalakian.

The Board heard testimony from Lisa Ellis, the borough’s director of business development, on existing concerns around parking for future residents of the development. Ellis testified that many available parking lot spots are not being used by tenants of existing downtown residential units. Of the 472 spots that make up the six lots that can be used for overnight residential parking, only 42 permits have been purchased to date.

Sign Up for FREE Madison Newsletter

The applicant is arguing that the nearby parking lots will satisfy parking needs for the Central Ave. development. Still, the board found it to be inadequate after hearing Ellis’ testimony and is requesting a new plan.

The board stood firm on continued concern regarding the lack of height variation in the development. The current schematics have the two properties, designed to appear as five buildings, standing at the same height.

One of the design updates presented to the board was the addition of “fake windows” on the side of the building neighboring Nicky’s Firehouse Italian Restaurant & Pizzeria. The windows, which people will not be able to see through, will be on the third story to soften the side view of the building.

The board was also unsatisfied with the streetscape plan presented — Board planner Susan Blickstein said the bike racks and benches as presented were too close to the curb line. The rendering was conceptual and not to scale, and the board requested an updated rendering at the next hearing.

The board also heard a presentation by Jim Burnet, the borough’s chief financial officer, on the development of a first-of-its-kind solar carport in Madison. It will be used to power borough facilities and subsequently offset municipal electric costs. The energy capacity of the structure could power 85 homes and will cover approximately 118 parking spaces. There will be no parking loss due to this. The closest residential neighbors are on Carrigan Lane, but a tree buffer will obstruct the view to residents.

Board planner Susan Blickstein said the solar carport complies with the master plan to increase sustainable energy practices. The board unanimously passed a resolution in favor of the project.

With many questions remaining, the 3 Central Avenue proposal was carried to the next Planning Board meeting on Feb. 7. The complementary 5 Central Avenue proposal will likewise be heard.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.

© Copyright 2022 Denville Medical.