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Latest News in Mount Arlington, NJ

Cheer for Roxbury/Mt. Arlington Veterans Aboard Saturday's 'Veteran's Cruise'

ROXBURY, NJ – Roxbury residents are being asked to help the township pay tribute this Saturday to veterans aboard the annual “Miss Lotta” Veteran’s Cruise on Lake Hopatcong.For Roxbury folks wishing to do so, the township is setting up a special viewing station at the Shore Hills Country Club (SHCC) in Landing. The club is at 195 Mt. Arlington Blvd., across from the Landing Market.“There, residents can cheer for the veterans aboard the 11:30 a.m. cruise, which includes veterans from both Roxbury an...

ROXBURY, NJ – Roxbury residents are being asked to help the township pay tribute this Saturday to veterans aboard the annual “Miss Lotta” Veteran’s Cruise on Lake Hopatcong.

For Roxbury folks wishing to do so, the township is setting up a special viewing station at the Shore Hills Country Club (SHCC) in Landing. The club is at 195 Mt. Arlington Blvd., across from the Landing Market.

“There, residents can cheer for the veterans aboard the 11:30 a.m. cruise, which includes veterans from both Roxbury and Mt. Arlington,” said the township. “The boat arrives at this viewing location at approximately 12:30 p.m.”

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The township said its “tribute to the Veterans” will feature Succasunna resident Andrew Darling singing Lee Greenwood’s song “I’m Proud to Be An American.”

Attendees will include members of the Roxbury Township Council, local Scouts, friends and family of the veterans on the cruise and some Roxbury High School cheerleaders. “All are welcome to join this group to cheer on the veterans as they cruise up to the SHCC dock,” the township said.

Those wishing to attend are asked to arrive by noon at Shore Hills Country Club Beach and proceed to the dock area. “Get in the patriotic spirit and wear red, white and blue!” advised the township!”

Parking will be available at the nearby Rich Zoschak Park at 83 Vail Road and the Shore Hills Country Club banquet hall at 8 Morse Place.

Lakefront residents are being asked to decorated their docks with flags and banners and to cheer and wave as Miss Lotta goes past their properties.

Those with questions are asked to call Michele O’Halloran at Roxbury Town Hall at 973-448-2002.

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Runoff From Roxbury Project Dumps Dirt into Lake Rogerene

Lake Rogerene turned brown after stormwater runoff escaped the nearby construction site for The Villages housing development in RoxburyROXBURY, NJ – In what one area resident called an “environmental Armageddon,” dirt from a massive construction project in Landing was washed away by recent storms and ended up in Lake Rogerene, leaving the water brown and lake lovers livid.The runoff came from the 161-home housing development called The Villages at Roxbury now being built off Shippenport Road i...

Lake Rogerene turned brown after stormwater runoff escaped the nearby construction site for The Villages housing development in Roxbury

ROXBURY, NJ – In what one area resident called an “environmental Armageddon,” dirt from a massive construction project in Landing was washed away by recent storms and ended up in Lake Rogerene, leaving the water brown and lake lovers livid.

The runoff came from the 161-home housing development called The Villages at Roxbury now being built off Shippenport Road in Roxbury, about a quarter mile away from Lake Rogerene, according to residents and officials. Some homeowners in the lake community, which lies mostly in Mount Arlington, angrily demanded action at Tuesday’s meeting of the Roxbury Mayor and Council.

Among them was Lake Rogerene Civic Association Trustee Paula Danchuk, who brought aerial photos showing the condition of the 9-acre lake before and after last week’s heavy rains. The drone shots showed a once-clear lake turned to opaque tan by the storm runoff.

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“We thought we had things in place that would protect Lake Rogerene,” Danchuck told the council. “But, obviously, it’s not working.”

The Villages at Roxbury project - including stormwater runoff prevention - was approved in 2007, but work didn’t begin until last year.

Early Morning Phone Call

Roxbury Township Manager John Shepherd said he was made aware of the situation late last week, noting the runoff came from heavy rain that started last Thursday evening. “Everybody who lives here knows how heavy that storm was that occurred, certainly not a common storm for us,” he said. “But it was a heavy storm. We have those.”

Shepherd said he was alerted to the problem at about 7:30 a.m. Friday by Mount Arlington Borough Administrator Carolyn Rinaldi. “She let me know there was a problem, and it needed to be looked at,” he said. “I let her know we’d look at it immediately.”

A consulting engineer for Roxbury went to the site as did inspectors from the Morris County Soil Conservation District (MCSCD), the agency that enforces the state Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act. Shepherd said the MCSCD, by 11 a.m. Friday, told the contractors building The Villages “what needed to be repaired.”

He said the inspectors found that “something wasn’t properly blocked, one of the outlet structures, or it just broke loose due to the volume of water.” Shepherd said the broken system has been repaired, but he noted the MCSCD also “recommended some additional measures along the outlet … to provide additional controls for any sedimentation.”

'Like An Open Strip Mine'

Mount Arlington Borough Councilman Andrew Cangiano, a Lake Rogerene resident, attended the Roxbury council meeting and confirmed that “everybody jumped right on” the matter as soon as they were alerted.

“It’s a very unique situation,” he said. “You have a very, very large construction site … It’s like an open strip mine. It’s just a huge, huge project.”

Cangiano said the soil erosion prevention system that broke during the storm was little more than “an old piece of plywood” and he stressed that “the results were catastrophic.”

He called for “some redundancy … a little resiliency” in the project’s runoff prevention. “Because if the one piece of plywood breaks free in another heavy storm, we don’t know what the effects of this is going to be on the lake. We just can’t afford another break,” Cangiano said.

Roxbury Mayor Jim Rilee said he was “a little surprised” that the MCSCD allowed The Villages at Roxbury builders to have vulnerable erosion prevention systems in place. “They’re usually a pain in the butt sometimes with what they require,” he commented.

Rilee asked that research be done to see if The Villages at Roxbury's escrow account can be used to help remediate the situation. The Villages at Roxbury is being built by Stone Water Holding, a preferred developer for Ryan Homes. The company could not immediately be reached for comment.

During the meeting’s public session, Lake Rogerene resident Andrew Danchuck tried to express the seriousness of the matter, noting that the lake is “the centerpiece” of the Lake Rogerene community.

“It’s gorgeous,” he said. “And it’s being ripped apart right now. What happened here: The Villages committed environmental Armageddon against Lake Rogerene. It’s beyond horrific what’s happening.”

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RECENT ARTICLES NEARBY

Greenbacker announces commercial operation of solar farm in New Jersey

NEW YORK, July 20, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Greenbacker Renewable Energy Company LLC (“GREC” or “Greenbacker”), a leading green energy investment company and independent power producer, celebrated that its Mt. Arlington Landfill solar project entered commercial operation at a June 17 ribbon cutting attended by federal, state, and local government representatives.The 2.3 MWdc ...

NEW YORK, July 20, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Greenbacker Renewable Energy Company LLC (“GREC” or “Greenbacker”), a leading green energy investment company and independent power producer, celebrated that its Mt. Arlington Landfill solar project entered commercial operation at a June 17 ribbon cutting attended by federal, state, and local government representatives.

The 2.3 MWdc solar farm sits atop a capped landfill, giving new life to land that had sat idle for years. Today, under Greenbacker’s ownership, it produces cheaper clean power for the Borough of Mt. Arlington, NJ.

US Rep. Tom Malinowski (D-NJ 7th District) said at the ribbon-cutting: “Congratulations to all the folks at Greenbacker for completing this project, and to Mt. Arlington for converting a dump into something that can help save our economy and help save the planet.” (Malinowski is co-author of the America COMPETES Act, a bipartisan proposal to help boost domestic manufacturing of essential materials, including solar panels and other clean energy components.)

Community residents and project partners also attended the event, hosted by the borough. In recognition of the positive impact the solar farm has had on the area, Assemblywoman Aura Dunn and State Senator Tony Bucco presented the borough with a joint Senate-Assembly Commendation from the state of New Jersey at the ceremony.

Mehul Mehta, CIO of GREC, emphasized the importance of investing in renewable energy projects. “The energy transition isn’t a nice-to-have, it’s a must-have. We’ve hit a critical juncture where it’s essential to scale the energy transition with projects like this sooner rather than later.”

Greenbacker purchased the solar farm from developer HESP Solar (“HESP”) in late 2021. HESP and local officials spent several years coordinating efforts to make the land suitable for redevelopment and transform it into a functioning solar farm.

“This was a blighted property that was turned into a magnificent project to the benefit of our residents,” Mt. Arlington mayor Michael Stanzilis said at the ribbon cutting. “It brings clean energy to the people in our borough, and it puts money back into taxpayers’ pockets.”

Since the solar energy project began producing power for the borough—with whom Greenbacker has a long-term power purchase agreement—it has generated over 1.3 gigawatt-hours of clean energy, abating 971 metric tons of carbon. That’s roughly equivalent to the emissions from consuming 110,000 gallons of gasoline or burning 1.1 million pounds of coal.1

Over the last few years, Greenbacker has partnered with HESP on 17 renewable energy projects. Ten of them are in New Jersey.

Greenbacker’s fleet of clean energy projects comprises over 2.6 GW of generating capacity (including Mt. Arlington Landfill and assets that are to be constructed). Since 2016, Greenbacker’s real assets have produced nearly 4.3 million megawatt-hours2 of clean energy, abating over 3.0 million metric tons of carbon.3 Today these projects support over 4,700 green jobs.4

About Greenbacker Renewable Energy CompanyGreenbacker Renewable Energy Company LLC is a publicly reporting, non-traded limited liability sustainable infrastructure company that acquires and manages income-producing renewable energy and other energy-related businesses, including solar and wind farms. We seek to invest in high-quality projects that sell clean power under long-term contract to high-creditworthy counterparties such as utilities, municipalities, and corporations. We are long-term owner-operators, who strive to be good stewards of the land and responsible members of the communities in which we operate. We believe our focus on power production and income generation creates value that we can then pass on to our shareholders—while facilitating the transition toward a clean energy future. For more information, please visit www.greenbackercapital.com.

About HESPHESP Solar LLC is based in Montvale, New Jersey, and is a leading developer of distributed generation solar energy power plants. HESP Solar is a pioneer in developing innovative financing solutions used to develop, build, and own clean solar energy systems. They specialize in providing Commercial, Industrial, and Municipal customers with creative and advantageous solutions to significantly reduce their carbon footprint, as well as their energy costs, through the generation of renewable solar energy.

About the Borough of Mt. Arlington, NJMount Arlington is situated in the western portion of Morris County, New Jersey. Comprising 2.9 square miles, the Borough is a business-friendly area with a rich local history and a bright sustainable future. It offers community-focused amenities, including a public beach, walking and hiking trails, playgrounds, sports, and a community garden. Mount Arlington also offers convenient access to public transit, with easy access to major interstates and regional highways, as well as commuter bus and rail links to New York City.

Forward-Looking StatementsThis press release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the federal securities laws. Forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause the actual results to differ materially from those anticipated at the time the forward-looking statements are made. Although Greenbacker believes the expectations reflected in such forward-looking statements are based upon reasonable assumptions, it can give no assurance that the expectations will be attained or that any deviation will not be material. Greenbacker undertakes no obligation to update any forward-looking statement contained herein to conform to actual results or changes in its expectations.

Media contacts:
GreenbackerChris LarsonSenior Writer & Media Communications847.313.9035[email protected]HESPSusan BrodieChief Operations Officer[email protected]
Mt. ArlingtonCarolyn RinaldiBorough Administrator973.398.6832 ext. 116[email protected]

A photo accompanying this announcement is available at https://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/20981a77-a227-4b90-9dfe-eba034fe1fd2

____________________1 When compared with a similar amount of power generation from fossil fuels. Carbon abatement is calculated using the EPA Greenhouse Gas Equivalencies Calculator which uses the AVoided Emissions and geneRation Tool (AVERT) US national weighted average CO2 marginal emission rate to convert reductions of kilowatt-hours into avoided units of carbon dioxide emissions. Data represents October 12, 2021 through June 2, 2022.2 Data is as of March 31, 2022.3 EPA Greenhouse Gas Equivalencies Calculator. Data is as of March 31, 2022.4 Green jobs are calculated from the International Renewable Energy Agency's measurement that one megawatt of renewable power supports 3.8 jobs. Data is as of March 31, 2022.

A bird’s eye view of Greenbacker’s 2.3 MW solar farm on a capped landfill, delivering clean energy t...

New Jersey Mt. Arlington Landfill solar project in commercial operation, says Greenbacker

Greenbacker Renewable Energy Company LLC’s Mt. Arlington Landfill solar project entered commercial operation at a June 17 ribbon cutting attended by federal, state, and local government representatives. The 2.3 MWdc solar farm sits atop a capped landfill, giving new life to land that had sat idle for years.Greenbacker purchased the solar farm from developer ...

Greenbacker Renewable Energy Company LLC’s Mt. Arlington Landfill solar project entered commercial operation at a June 17 ribbon cutting attended by federal, state, and local government representatives. The 2.3 MWdc solar farm sits atop a capped landfill, giving new life to land that had sat idle for years.

Greenbacker purchased the solar farm from developer HESP Solar in late 2021. HESP and local officials spent several years coordinating efforts to make the land suitable for redevelopment and transform it into a functioning solar farm. Over the last few years, Greenbacker has partnered with HESP on 17 renewable energy projects. Ten of them are in New Jersey.

“This was a blighted property that was turned into a magnificent project to the benefit of our residents,” Mt. Arlington mayor Michael Stanzilis said at the ribbon cutting. “It brings clean energy to the people in our borough, and it puts money back into taxpayers’ pockets.”

Since the solar energy project began producing power for the borough—with whom Greenbacker has a long-term power purchase agreement—it has generated over 1.3 gigawatt-hours of clean energy, abating 971 metric tons of carbon. That’s roughly equivalent to the emissions from consuming 110,000 gallons of gasoline or burning 1.1 million pounds of coal.

US Rep. Tom Malinowski (D-NJ 7th District) said at the ribbon-cutting: “Congratulations to all the folks at Greenbacker for completing this project, and to Mt. Arlington for converting a dump into something that can help save our economy and help save the planet.” Malinowski is co-author of the America COMPETES Act, a bipartisan proposal to help boost domestic manufacturing of essential materials, including solar panels and other clean energy components.

Community residents and project partners also attended the event, hosted by the borough. In recognition of the positive impact the solar farm has had on the area, Assemblywoman Aura Dunn and State Senator Tony Bucco presented the borough with a joint Senate-Assembly Commendation from the state of New Jersey at the ceremony.

Mehul Mehta, CIO of GREC, emphasized the importance of investing in renewable energy projects. “The energy transition isn’t a nice-to-have, it’s a must-have. We’ve hit a critical juncture where it’s essential to scale the energy transition with projects like this sooner rather than later.”

Greenbacker’s fleet of clean energy projects comprises over 2.6 GW of generating capacity (including Mt. Arlington Landfill and assets that are to be constructed).

Tags: commercial and industrial, Greenbacker Renewable Energy Company, landfill

'Leave Us Alone,' Mt. Arlington Crowd Tells Roxbury/Mt. Arlington Consolidation Study Group

A crowd, consisting mainly of unhappy Mount Arlington residents attended meeting on municipal consolidation A crowd, consisting mainly of unhappy Mount Arlington residents attended meeting on municipal consolidation Mount Arlington Mayor Michael Stanzilis asks those opposed to Roxbury/Mount Arlington consolidation to raise their handsROXBURY, NJ – Dozens of Mount Arlington residents last night forcefully told the Roxbury/Mount Arlington Consolidation Study Commissi...

A crowd, consisting mainly of unhappy Mount Arlington residents attended meeting on municipal consolidation

A crowd, consisting mainly of unhappy Mount Arlington residents attended meeting on municipal consolidation

Mount Arlington Mayor Michael Stanzilis asks those opposed to Roxbury/Mount Arlington consolidation to raise their hands

ROXBURY, NJ – Dozens of Mount Arlington residents last night forcefully told the Roxbury/Mount Arlington Consolidation Study Commission they are not interested in seeing their borough become a hamlet of Roxbury even if it would bring a big decrease in property taxes.

Prodded by a social media campaign and word-of-mouth exhortations – efforts lambasted by commission Chairman Craig Heard as being full of inflammatory falsehoods – the borough residents jammed into the Roxbury Senior Center. They comprised most of the approximately 200 people attending the commission meeting and many loudly expressed anger, distrust and a “leave us alone” attitude.

The panel of volunteers, representing both municipalities, has been studying for four years whether a consolidation of Roxbury and Mount Arlington would yield any benefit to taxpayers. If approved by voters, the idea would be to dissolve both towns and form a new one in which Mount Arlington would be a section of Roxbury, similar in nature to Landing, Port Morris, Kenvil, Ledgewood, Succasunna and Lower Berkshire Valley.

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Commission Chairman Craig Heard recently said the panel’s latest information showed that municipal consolidation would result in almost $12 million per year in cost savings for the towns and cut about $1,000 per year from the average Roxbury homeowner’s tax bill.

However, he also recently learned the state’s municipal consolidation law would require Mount Arlington’s tax rate to be equalized with Roxbury’s, a factor that would mean Mount Arlington homeowners would see no tax reduction.

Searching for a Solution

Heard said an expert in the state’s municipal consolidation law is looking into ways this situation can be avoided. If that can be done, Mount Arlington property owners would see tax bill reductions of about 10 percent yearly after a consolidation, he said.

But finding a way around the equalization problem is unlikely. The commissioners said they would not vote to bring before the voters a proposal that did not project tax savings for people in both towns.

If the equalization issue had not come up, the commission might have voted to have the consolidation question placed on the general election ballot this November. It’s now too late to have that take place.

The panel voted last night to seek from the state Department of Community Affairs (DCA) an extension of its charter through December 2020. If the tax equalization matter can be resolved, and if the panel continues to find probable tax savings for both towns through consolidation, it might have the question placed on the November 2020 ballot.

Don't Bother

However, people at yesterday’s meeting – including Mount Arlington Mayor Michael Stanzilis – resoundingly told the commission they want nothing to do with consolidation. Some said they did not want their borough to lose its identity.

Stanzilis said Mount Arlington doesn't need "a merger" to reduce taxes. However, the mayor said he’s a firm believer in some forms of cost-sharing between neighboring towns.

“I believe New Jersey is moving hard in the direction of shared services,” Stanzilis said. “We can accomplish what the merger is trying to do on our own. Smaller is better.”

Roxbury Mayor Bob DeFillippo, who is a member of the commission, and Roxbury Township Manager John Shepherd also oppose the commission’s effort. Both said the panel’s facts and figures are inaccurate, with DeFillippo contending the group’s investigations lacked professional methodology.

Heard, and others on the commission, said the municipalities – particularly Mount Arlington – have been uncooperative when it comes to providing data needed for the study. He challenged the assertions by Shepherd and DeFillippo, noting that former Roxbury Township Manager Chris Raths – who retired in 2017 - was much more cooperative than Shepherd and provided much of the information used by the commission.

Many people at the meeting said they only recently learned about the commission. Commissioners said the group's meetings have been open to the public and they noted much of its information can be found on its Facebook page and website.

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