fbpx

Loading. Please wait.

PHONE: (973) 627-7888 OPENING HOURS: MONDAY-FRIDAY 9:00am-7:00pm, SATURDAY 9:00am-1:00pm

Acupuncture in Boonton Township, NJ

Let's Talk!

Discover Long-Lasting Pain Relief with Acupuncture Treatments from Denville Medical

At Denville Medical, we aim to serve you with long-lasting quality of life through personalized acupuncture treatments in New Jersey. The path to a pain-free life begins with a friendly, informative appointment, where one of our doctors develops a customized treatment plan tailored to your body's needs. It starts with your first evaluation, where our experts learn about your medical history, diagnostic tests, current condition, and overall health goals. From there, we'll create your plan and help you hit your milestones until your quality of life is improved.

With treatments like needling, cupping, Gua Sha, and acupuncture in Boonton Township, NJ, included in your scope of treatment, musculoskeletal relief is right around the corner.

If you're sick and tired of living with painful limitations, our doctors are here to help you live a normal life free of debilitating body issues. No surgery. No addictive medicine. Only comprehensive acupuncture treatments, crafted with health and happiness in mind.

Physical-therapy-phone-number 973-627-7888

Request a Consultation

Latest News in Boonton Township, NJ

Boys soccer: Results, links and featured coverage for Thursday, Oct. 20

THURSDAY, OCT. 20FEATURED COVERAGEMercer County Tournament final3-Pennington 4, 1-Notre Dame 0COUNTY TOURNAMENT SCOREBOARDTOP 20 SCOREBOARDSTATEWIDE SCOREBOARDThursday, Oct. 20St. Augustine 0 (7), Egg Harbor 0 (6) - Box ScoreHammonton 2, Middle Township 1 - ...

THURSDAY, OCT. 20

FEATURED COVERAGE

Mercer County Tournament final

3-Pennington 4, 1-Notre Dame 0

COUNTY TOURNAMENT SCOREBOARD

TOP 20 SCOREBOARD

STATEWIDE SCOREBOARD

Thursday, Oct. 20

St. Augustine 0 (7), Egg Harbor 0 (6) - Box Score

Hammonton 2, Middle Township 1 - Box Score

Gill St. Bernard's 3, Princeton Day 0 - Box Score

Montclair Kimberley 2, Newark Academy 0 - Box Score

Howell 3, Holmdel 1 - Box Score

Christian Brothers 2, Middletown North 1 - Box Score

BCSL

Pennsauken 2, Willingboro 1 - Box Score

Florence 3, Ewing 2 - Box Score

BIG NORTH

DePaul 7, Lakeland 2 - Box Score

Bergen Catholic 2, Ridgewood 1 - Box Score

St. Joseph (Mont.) 3, Don Bosco Prep 1 - Box Score

Pascack Hills 6, Paramus Catholic 1 - Box Score

Northern Highlands 2, Paramus 0 - Box Score

CAPE-ATLANTIC

Pleasantville 6, Oakcrest 1 - Box Score

COLONIAL

Haddonfield 0, Haddon Heights 0 - Box Score

Lindenwold 3, Gateway 2 - Box Score

CVC

Florence 3, Ewing 2 - Box Score

GMC

Noor-ul-iman 2, Piscataway Magnet 1 - Box Score

J.P. Stevens 2, Franklin 1 - Box Score

HCIAL

College Achieve Central Charter 4, McNair 2 - Box Score

NJAC

Rutgers Prep 1, Hanover Park 0 - Box Score

Morris Hills 6, Morris Knolls 4 - Box Score

Parsippany 6, Morris Catholic 0 - Box Score

Jefferson 5, Morristown-Beard 2 - Box Score

NJIC

Saddle Brook 4, Paterson Charter 1 - Box Score

OLYMPIC

Cherry Hill West 2, Eastern 1 - Box Score

Moorestown 5, Winslow 1 - Box Score

Camden Tech 0, Shawnee 0 - Box Score

SEC

Glen Ridge 2, Newark Central 0 - Box Score

Columbia 4, Bayonne 0 - Box Score

Caldwell 10, North Star Academy 0 - Box Score

Bloomfield 1, Technology 0 - Box Score

Cedar Grove 2, Belleville 0 - Box Score

SHORE

Ocean Township 4, Barnegat 0 - Box Score

Point Pleasant Beach 6, Keyport 0 - Box Score

Toms River North 1, Manasquan 0 - Box Score

Point Pleasant Boro 3, Toms River East 3 - Box Score

Central Regional 2, Jackson Liberty 1 - Box Score

Wall 2, Brick Memorial 2 - Box Score

SKYLAND

Rutgers Prep 1, Hanover Park 0 - Box Score

Woodbridge 3, Bound Brook 1 - Box Score

Voorhees 3, North Hunterdon 1 - Box Score

Delaware Valley 3, Phillipsburg 2 - Box Score

J.P. Stevens 2, Franklin 1 - Box Score

TRI-COUNTY

Delsea 3, Triton 0 - Box Score

Bridgeton 3, Cumberland 0 - Box Score

Pitman 2, Gloucester Catholic 0 - Box Score

UCC

Union Catholic 4, Roselle Catholic 3 - Box Score

Linden 2, New Providence 1 - Box Score

Hillside 7, Dayton 0 - Box Score

Rahway 3, Oratory 2 - Box Score

Roselle 6, Thomas Edison Energy Charter 0 - Box Score

Roselle Park 2, Brearley 1 - Box Score

Gov. Livingston 3, Plainfield 0 - Box Score

Independent

Camden Tech 0, Shawnee 0 - Box Score

Noor-ul-iman 2, Piscataway Magnet 1 - Box Score

Roselle 6, Thomas Edison Energy Charter 0 - Box Score

College Achieve Central Charter 4, McNair 2 - Box Score

The N.J. High School Sports newsletter now appearing in mailboxes 5 days a week. Sign up now and be among the first to get all the boys and girls sports you care about, straight to your inbox each weekday. To add your name, click here.

Thank you for relying on us to provide the journalism you can trust. Please consider supporting NJ.com with a subscription.

If the NJ football season ended today, here's how the public playoff brackets would look

There's one week left in the New Jersey high school football season for public school teams, but the playoff picture is becoming clear.Below is a complete look at what the public school brackets would look like if the season ended today. The brackets are determined by the total number of power points that each team has accumulated. Power point rankings can be found at GridironNewJersey...

There's one week left in the New Jersey high school football season for public school teams, but the playoff picture is becoming clear.

Below is a complete look at what the public school brackets would look like if the season ended today. The brackets are determined by the total number of power points that each team has accumulated. Power point rankings can be found at GridironNewJersey.com.

There are 32 teams that make the playoffs in each of the five groups. Those 32 are made up of the top 16 in each half of the state.

The top 16 teams in the North are snaked into either North 1 or North 2, while the top 16 teams in the South are snaked into either Central or South. So, teams currently listed in North 1 may end up in North 2 when the official brackets come out, and vice versa. Same with teams currently listed in Central or South.

In December, the North champion will play the Central/South champion to determine true group state champions for the first time ever.

North 1, Group 1

(8) Verona at (1) Wood-Ridge

(5) Waldwick/Midland Park at (4) Cedar Grove

(6) North Arlington at (3) Brearley

(7) North Warren at (2) Mountain Lakes

North 2, Group 1

(8) Boonton at (1) Park Ridge

(5) Hasbrouck Heights at (4) Wallkill Valley

(6) Cresskill at (3) Butler

(7) Kinnelon at (2) Weequahic

Central, Group 1

(8) Haddon Township at (1) Woodstown

(5) Pitman at (4) Shore

(6) Asbury Park at (3) Salem

(7) Keyport at (2) Maple Shade

South, Group 1

(8) Middlesex at (1) Woodbury

(5) Paulsboro at (4) Audobon

(6) South Hunterdon at (3) Glassboro

(7) Florence at (2) Manville

North 1, Group 2

(8) High Point at (1) Rutherford

(5) Newark West Side at (4) Glen Rock

(6) Jefferson at (3) Madison

(7) Hanover Park at (2) Westwood

North 2, Group 2

(8) Pequannock at (1) Caldwell

(5) Bernards at (4) Ramsey

(6) Ridgefield Park at (3) Dumont

(7) Becton at (2) Newton

Central, Group 2

(8) Overbrook at (1) Point Pleasant Boro

(5) Pleasantville at (4) Delaware Valley

(6) Monmouth at (3) Oakcrest

(7) Middle Township at (2) Rumson-Fair Haven

South, Group 2

(8) West Deptford at (1) Raritan

(5) Willingboro at (4) New Providence

(6) Johnson at (3) Gloucester City

(7) Cinnaminson at (2) Haddonfield

North 1, Group 3

(8) Snyder at (1) Old Tappan

(5) River Dell at (4) Mendham

(6) Wayne Hills at (3) Montville

(7) Vernon at (2) Hillside

North 2, Group 3

(8) Warren Hills at (1) West Morris

(5) Paramus at (4) West Essex

(6) Hackettstown at (3) Sparta

(7) Summit at (2) Cranford

Central, Group 3

(8) Carteret at (1) Camden

(5) South Plainfield at (4) Highland

(6) Cedar Creek at (3) Hopewell Valley

(7) Nottingham at (2) Seneca

South, Group 3

(8) Somerville at (1) Delsea

(5) Manasquan at (4) Camden Eastside

(6) Matawan at (3) Timber Creek

(7) Burlington Township at (2) Ocean Township

North 1, Group 4

(8) Middletown North at (1) Irvington

(5) Roxbury at (4) Ridge

(6) Rahway at (3) Wayne Valley

(7) Sayreville at (2) Randolph

North 2, Group 4

(8) Woodbridge at (1) North Hunterdon

(5) Northern Highlands at (4) Colonia

(6) Montgomery at (3) Morris Knolls

(7) Chatham at (2) Ramapo

Central, Group 4

(8) Northern Burlington at (1) Middletown South

(5) Winslow at (4) Jackson

(6) Moorestown at (3) Shawnee

(7) Long Branch at (2) Colts Neck

South, Group 4

(8) Steinert at (1) Hammonton

(5) Ocean City at (4) Mainland

(6) Manalapan at (3) Pennsauken

(7) Lacey at (2) Millville

North 1, Group 5

(8) Bayonne at (1) Ridgewood

(5) Piscataway at (4) Westfield

(6) West Orange at (3) Clifton

(7) Union at (2) Passaic Tech

North 2, Group 5

(8) Morristown at (1) Phillipsburg

(5) Paterson Eastside at (4) East Orange Campus

(6) Bridgewater-Raritan at (3) Watchung Hills

(7) Montclair at (2) Union City

Central, Group 5

(8) Hunterdon Central at (1) North Brunswick

(5) Marlboro at (4) Atlantic City

(6) Edison at (3) Kingsway

(7) Williamstown at (2) Toms River North

South, Group 5

(8) South Brunswick at (1) Lenape

(5) Rancocas Valley at Washington Township

(6) Southern at (3) Cherokee

(7) Freehold Township at (2) Hillsborough

Five Open Space Projects Recommended to Commissioners for 2022 Funding

Boonton, Boonton Township, Hanover, Mount Olive & Wharton Sites Submitted for GrantsMorris County’s Open Space Trust Fund Committee tonight recommended that the Board of County Commissioners approve $2.13 million to acquire and preserve a total of 34.6 acres in 2022 Open Space projects spanning five towns.The recommendations, covering properties in Boonton, Boonton Township, Hanover, Wharton and Mount Olive, were presented to the Commissioners with recommen...

Boonton, Boonton Township, Hanover, Mount Olive & Wharton Sites Submitted for Grants

Morris County’s Open Space Trust Fund Committee tonight recommended that the Board of County Commissioners approve $2.13 million to acquire and preserve a total of 34.6 acres in 2022 Open Space projects spanning five towns.

The recommendations, covering properties in Boonton, Boonton Township, Hanover, Wharton and Mount Olive, were presented to the Commissioners with recommendations for approving the projects during the board’s public work session in Morristown. The parcels targeted for preservation range in sizes from .3 of an acre to almost 19 acres.

The Commissioners will make a formal decision later this year on whether to accept the recommendations.

“This is an important part of what we do here in Morris County as the Board of Commissioners. Each year we carefully review whether to preserve areas with our open space funding, as well as whether to restore historic sites and expand our trail systems. It is part of a regular analysis of the best use of trust funds to protect and improve upon a quality of life enjoyed by all of our residents. Our parkland is second to none, our successful historic preservation trust fund is in its 20th year and since 1994, we have preserved nearly 17,730 acres of open space, which is larger than the Township of Parsippany,” said Commissioner Director Tayfun Selen.

Jay Thomson, who chairs the 15-member Morris County Open Space Trust Fund Committee, presented the recommendations to the Commissioners.

"It has been another great year for the Open Space program in Morris County. The county continues to show tremendous support to its towns by helping them to be proactive in preserving open space so that its residents have the opportunity to have a place to enjoy the outdoors close to home. This program is one of our county's crown jewels that we can all be proud of. Morris County continues to be a great place to live and work." said Thomson.

Funding for open space acquisitions and preservation comes from the voter-approved Morris County Open Space & Farmland Preservation Trust Fund, which is generated by a special county tax. The funding source also is used for farmland and historic preservation, county parkland acquisition, trail construction and the purchase of residential properties prone to flooding.

Since 1994, the Morris County Open Space Program has awarded $320,060,878 in grants for 490 applications. Applicants have successfully closed on 421 of those projects, preserving 17,728.24 acres. This is all in addition to lands that have been preserved and improved through the other Preservation Trust Fund Programs: Farmland Preservation, Historic Preservation, Flood Mitigation and Trails Construction.

2022 OPEN SPACE RECOMMENDATIONS:

Historic Turntable Property Adjacent to Grace Lord Park

Alli Property

Bee Meadow Greenway – Phase II

Budd Lake Dock Extension

Acquisition of Land for Creation of Orchard Mine Park (pictured top right)

'A lack of qualified manpower': Boonton Kiwanis First Aid Squad ceases operations

The Boonton Kiwanis First Aid Squad answered its first call on the morning of Aug. 25, 1938, when Herbert Romine lost control of his motorcycle on Beverwyck Road, crashed and broke his leg.The responders arrived at the scene in seven minutes and delivered Romine to Morristown Memorial Hospital in 29 minutes, according to a newspaper account.The question now is when or if the volunteer squad will answer a call again. On Monday the squad announced that it would cease operations until at least Jan. 3, 2022.Of...

The Boonton Kiwanis First Aid Squad answered its first call on the morning of Aug. 25, 1938, when Herbert Romine lost control of his motorcycle on Beverwyck Road, crashed and broke his leg.

The responders arrived at the scene in seven minutes and delivered Romine to Morristown Memorial Hospital in 29 minutes, according to a newspaper account.

The question now is when or if the volunteer squad will answer a call again. On Monday the squad announced that it would cease operations until at least Jan. 3, 2022.

Officers in the organization cite "a lack of qualified manpower to fill organizational roles and maintenance issues with both of our ambulances," according to social media posts.

"The decision to do so did not come easy nor was it a unanimous vote amongst our Membership," the officers wrote. "With these circumstances at play, and for the continued safety and welfare of the population we serve, it was best decided to work on recruitment to obtain a level of membership we are comfortable with and to find permanent solutions to our ongoing ambulance maintenance issues."

'A huge loss'

By contract, Boonton residents will continue to be covered by Saint Clare’s Hospital-based EMS squads weekdays from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Parsippany EMS will cover Mountain Lakes. Boonton Township, which the squad used to cover, contracted separately with Saint Clare's in 2019.

50 years?:Morristown man accused of killing 3-year-old faces elevated charge, is offered plea deal

The Morris County Office of Emergency Management EMS, or one of its dispatched designees, will cover calls for service from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. on weeknights and on weekend days and nights.

"This is a huge loss to the Tri-Town area," said Sen. Anthony Bucco, a 40-year volunteer member of the Boonton Fire Department. "These dedicated individuals that respond to emergency calls know their neighbors when they arrive on the scene, and that relationship is irreplaceable. I know firsthand how important that is when a tragedy hits."

The squad said it answered 800 calls last year.

Bucco said he called on the state and municipalities "to do more to support these volunteers and make it easier for them to receive the training they need to continue their service." Bucco said he's available to meet with the squad and the towns to see if anything can be done to reverse the decision.

The Boonton Kiwanis First Aid Squad operates on donations and does not charge for its services. It is not the only volunteer squad feeling the pinch of money and manpower in recent years.

Citing similar problems and other complications resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, the 93-year-old Belmar First Aid Squad announced its closure in March. The North Haledon EMT headquarters was sold late last year after a shortage of volunteers forced that squad to disband. Volunteer squads in Rochelle Park and Maywood shut down in 2018.

Boonton officers stressed that "at this time, this is not a final cease of operations but rather a reorganization effort."

"For just over 80 years, we have been blessed by the communities serviced and countless number of lives saved through various life-safety measures," they wrote. "To continue our mission, we must re-define who we are and what we mean to the communities we render aid to. Our current plan is to return in full operation on January 3rd, 2022, at 6 p.m."

Boonton town officials note a decline in volunteerism going back to 1997 that forced the town to hire a limited paid staff. A "lack of sustainable donations" forced the town to lay off that paid staff in 2015.

"The average annual cost for that program alone was $80,000," the town website shows. "In addition, we have maintained an operating budget of roughly $100,000 per year."

Financial aid:NJ residents struggling to make rent payments have until Dec. 15 to apply for rental aid

Morris County OEM Director Jeff Paul said he was not aware of any other similar first-aid or EMS squad closures recently in Morris County, and his department is working with Boonton to help it get back up and running in January.

"This is the first one, and we're hoping it's short-lived," Paul said. "The beauty of it is we have a county system that can fill some holes while they're doing it. Not just us, with our partners. The Boonton model will be supported by Morris County plus Saint Clare's plus Par-Troy. We're all in this together to support Boonton Kiwanis."

Paul confirmed that the COVID pandemic had a negative impact on first-aid squads in terms of both recruitment and attrition.

"COVID has changed the face of volunteerism," Paul said. "Individuals are concerned about having a greater level of exposure, and I think you had members with pre-existing conditions who were still volunteering out of the goodness of their heart." When COVID struck, it brought about a change, he said.

"Some obviously got sick. Others, acting on advice of their doctors, realized it might be very dangerous right now," Paul said.

Fortunately in Morris County, which generally follows a volunteer model, the commissioners in designing the county EMS system made it "mandatory that we support volunteerism and fill gaps," Paul said.

Residents of the towns responded to the announcement with alarm on social media.

"After putting a decade of service in myself it is sad to see the organization come to this," J.W. Moorhouse posted on the Boonton Townshippers Facebook page. "I hope that the administration is able to get the proper people in place to bring the squad back to the days where we were able to staff two full ambulances at a time with five people per crew."

"We all will hope new members will sign up so we do not permanently lose you all, but want you to know just how much you all are appreciated by our family and so many others in town," Wendy Crans posted on the Boonton NJ Facebook page.

The squad is raising funds through its annual poinsettia sale. Details can be found on the Boonton Kiwanis First Aid Squad Facebook page.

William Westhoven is a local reporter for DailyRecord.com. For unlimited access to the most important news from your local community, please subscribe or activate your digital account today.

Does Boonton Township's name give it a bad rap?

BOONTON TOWNSHIP -- What's in a name?According to Ed Daspin of Boonton Township, unnecessarily low property values. He says his municipality's name lumps it in with the neighboring Town of Boonton, and detracts from the reputation of a place he's glad to call home."The people that moved here over the last 25 years are the people that believe that branding and marketing of the wonderful way of life will lift the land values up, as right now the land and home...

BOONTON TOWNSHIP -- What's in a name?

According to Ed Daspin of Boonton Township, unnecessarily low property values. He says his municipality's name lumps it in with the neighboring Town of Boonton, and detracts from the reputation of a place he's glad to call home.

"The people that moved here over the last 25 years are the people that believe that branding and marketing of the wonderful way of life will lift the land values up, as right now the land and homes are a steal," Daspin said in an email to NJ Advance Media.

But for the nearly 700 members of the Keep Boonton Township Boonton Facebook group -- which sprung up last week in response to Daspin's plans for a petition -- the name "Boonton Township" holds plenty of value of its own. It's the name of the place where they grew up, where they raised their families. And it's a name they'd like to see stick.

"As a person who moved to (Boonton Township) in 1992 then moved out in 2005 and back in 2012, I'm disturbed and disgusted by the concept of changing our town's name for the sake of value," Lauren Bardach wrote to the group. "If you don't value your town and its history; it's time you move."

Daspin approached the Boonton Township Committee earlier this month with the idea, saying he and others would be putting together a committee hoping to effect a name change -- possibly to Mountain Lakes Township. The existing borough of Mountain Lakes was formed from portions of Boonton Township in 1924, and Boonton Township teens attend Mountain Lakes High School in a sending-receiving relationship.

Also up for consideration: Powerville, a historical name that still is used for a neighborhood in the township.

It's not an idea without precedent. West Paterson became Woodland Park in 2008 -- after several previous efforts to disassociate with Paterson failed. It proved a contentious change that was almost undone a year later. Passaic Township became Long Hill in 1992.

But it's not a change that would be made easily. To get it before voters, Daspin and his fellow committee members would need a petition to be signed by about 370 people -- 30 percent of those who voted in the last general election. That would have to be done by Aug. 14 to get on this year's ballot. Then, more than half the voters would need to say yes.

Township Administrator Barbara Shepard said as a resident, she's opposed to the idea -- and that she's gotten about 100 letters from other residents and former residents who feel the same way. Just one, she said, is in favor of a name change.

"As someone who's lived here for 20 years, I think Boonton Township has a terrific identity," she said. "I don't think it negatively impacts property values. I'm very proud to have raised my family here."

Daspin and opponents of his plan -- 600 or so joined the Facebook group within a day of its creation -- agree: Boonton Township's a nice place to live. He said it's a community with "minimum 2-acre lots, the best school system(s) in the state, meandering meadows, brooks, rivers, wildlife and streets that in the winter form a canopy of snow over the streets." For 2011-12, New Jersey Monthly named it the fourth-best place to live in New Jersey.

So what's wrong with the name?

Real Estate agent Ingrid Patois said the two Boontons do indeed sometimes get lumped together. And would-be home-buyers put a lot of weight -- maybe too much weight -- on the quality of a school system, she said. Last year, New Jersey Monthly rated Mountain Lakes High School, where Boonton Township students go, 19th in the state. Boonton High School, where the town's kids, go, was No. 212.

The median home value in the Boonton zip code is $381,800, according to Zillow.com. That figure encompasses both Boontons, as they share the zip code. In neighboring Mountain Lakes, it's $640,000. Note: A previous version of the post listed the value for the Boontons as $365,000, the value Zillow returns on a search for "Boonton, N.J."

But Patois said she thinks both Boontons are lovely communities -- and if anything, that the Town of Boonton is underrated.

"I think Boonton is coming into its own," she said. "I think we're seeing a trend happening there. If you can get past the high school stigma, that would elevate the housing costs -- there's a lot of room for equity in that town."

And Patois said she thinks home buyers know Boonton Township and Boonton Town are different communities -- they do their homework before considering purchases, she said.

For its part, the Boonton Township Committee is against a name change. It said in a Facebook post last week that while its members "listened respectfully when Mr. Daspin spoke to the committee," they're not on board with his idea.

"The name 'Township of Boonton' has served this township well for nearly 150 years," the committee wrote. "It is our intention that it will continue to do so for many more years to come."

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.

© Copyright 2022 Denville Medical.