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Latest News in Parsippany-Troy Hills, NJ

Free Community Events During Welcoming Week as Lakeland Hills Family YMCA Opens its New Welcome Center

MORRIS COuNTY – Where can a family play pickleball, dodgeball, and take a boot camp class, all in one week, and all for free? Why the Y of course! Lakeland Hills Family YMCA invites the community to its annual Welcoming Week, this year bigger and better than ever! Conveniently located where the Mountain Lakes, Parsippany, and Boonton borders meet at 100 Fanny Road in Mountain Lakes, the area’s leading community organization is offering a free week of fun events, all in one place, from September 13-18.Communities are strong...

MORRIS COuNTY – Where can a family play pickleball, dodgeball, and take a boot camp class, all in one week, and all for free? Why the Y of course! Lakeland Hills Family YMCA invites the community to its annual Welcoming Week, this year bigger and better than ever! Conveniently located where the Mountain Lakes, Parsippany, and Boonton borders meet at 100 Fanny Road in Mountain Lakes, the area’s leading community organization is offering a free week of fun events, all in one place, from September 13-18.

Communities are stronger and more cohesive when people from all backgrounds have the opportunity to get to know one another and work side by side to advance the common good. Welcoming Week brings YMCAs and other nonprofit organizations across the country together to help elevate the growing movement of communities that fully embrace all Americans and their contribution to the social fabric of the U.S.

“Celebrating community is what Lakeland Hills Family YMCA is all about,” says Alejandro (Alex) Martinez, CEO and President of the Y. “Our Y is excited to present an entire week of free programs and activities for families and children. Our community looks to Lakeland Hills Family YMCA for support in all facets of life – health and wellness, mental health awareness, spiritual connection, youth development, and more.”

Martinez continued, “Welcoming Week is being presented the day after we have our ribbon-cutting ceremony for our new Welcome Center. The Welcome Center has a mission-based purpose to foster community support. The Center is in memory of Kris Joganow, a long-time Y employee, friend, and supporter of the Y. Kris, the wife of our former CEO, Dr. Vik Joganow, passed away from COVID-19 in 2020. We are truly fortunate to reopen our facility to a beautiful new community-centric Welcome Center. This new space, which spans almost the entire first floor of our facility, includes areas for community programs and meetings, “Kris’ Coffee Corner” with enhanced free hot beverages, healthy self-vending machines with cashless purchases including parfaits, sandwiches, salads, snacks, and more. Additionally, the Lounge offers comfortable seating for meetings, work from your laptop with self-charging areas, a teen space, and more. These renovations and upgrades are due to the philanthropic efforts of individuals supporting Kris Joganow’s memory as well as corporations and other donors.

The Welcome Center at Lakeland Hills Family YMCA will have its official grand opening on Monday, September 12 at 6:00 p.m. for invited guests, donors, and dignitaries. It begins with a cleansing of the space followed by an ecumenical blessing of the new Center. The Y reopens to its members and the community on Tuesday, September 13. This is also the first day of Welcoming Week.

For the full calendar of events, programs, and activities as part of its Welcoming Week, click here or call Lakeland Hills Family YMCA at (973) 334-2820.

For more than 100 years the Y has been the leading community organization serving thousands of people, with its focus on Healthy Living, Youth Development, and Social Responsibility. No one serves the community as powerfully as the Y does every day.

Parsippany Spends $18.7K Per Student: How Does That Compare In NJ?

Spending by NJ school districts significantly varies and depends on several factors. Here's where Parsippany schools stand.PARSIPPANY, NJ — School districts in New Jersey budgeted an average of $18,208 per student last school year. The Parsippany-Troy Hills Township School District budgeted slightly more, according to data from the New Jersey Department of Education.The figures come from the state's 2022 Taxpayers' Guide to Education,...

Spending by NJ school districts significantly varies and depends on several factors. Here's where Parsippany schools stand.

PARSIPPANY, NJ — School districts in New Jersey budgeted an average of $18,208 per student last school year. The Parsippany-Troy Hills Township School District budgeted slightly more, according to data from the New Jersey Department of Education.

The figures come from the state's 2022 Taxpayers' Guide to Education, which shows the amounts that districts and schools have spent and budgeted per student. The guide also features information on what districts have spent or budgeted in specific categories, such as supplies, salaries and benefits, lunch programs, and support services.

Patch organized the data by type of district/school and ranked them by how much they budgeted per pupil in the 2021-22 school year. Read more: NJ Schools Spend $18K Per Student On Average: How Much Your Kid Gets

Per-student spending in U.S. public schools depends on a range of factors, including property values, tax revenues, financial constraints and political conditions. So a higher dollar figure doesn't necessarily indicate that a school district spends too much or values its students more, and a low amount doesn't automatically imply stinginess or efficiency.

The figures primarily serve as a way to help the public understand educational spending in their community and the state.

"This guide can be a helpful first step in discussions that residents have with their local school officials about school-spending needs," said Dr. Angelica Allen-McMillan, the state's acting education commissioner.

The taxpayer's guide separates school districts into 11 different operating categories based on enrollment size, grades served and other classifications. Parsippany is in a group of 92 districts that serve grades K-12 and has more than 3,500 students.

Parsippany's budgeting of $18,712 per student last school year ranked 30th in the group. Teaneck Public Schools topped the category at $26,096 per pupil, while Edison Township Public Schools budgeted the least — $13,401 per student.

The stage average for K-12 schools was $17,959 per pupil, with a median of $17,883 per child. For all schools under the state education department's jurisdiction, the average budgetary cost per student totaled $18,208 — an increase of $1,385 (8.2 percent) increase from the 2020-21 school year. The state median for per-student budgeting in the 2021-22 school year was $18,326, which was $1,559 (9.3 percent) more than the prior school year.

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Parsippany School Board, Union Disputes Resume In Contract Talks

The board accused union leaders of not supporting students in a statement that the union president claims is filled with 'distortions.'PARSIPPANY, NJ — The deadlock continues in contract negotiations between the Parsippany-Troy Hills Board of Education and the educator's union.The Parsippany Troy-Hills Education Association (PTHEA) broke its silence Jan. 20 about its struggles to negotiate a new contract with the school board as they continue working under a contract agreement that expired last summer. The board spoke p...

The board accused union leaders of not supporting students in a statement that the union president claims is filled with 'distortions.'

PARSIPPANY, NJ — The deadlock continues in contract negotiations between the Parsippany-Troy Hills Board of Education and the educator's union.

The Parsippany Troy-Hills Education Association (PTHEA) broke its silence Jan. 20 about its struggles to negotiate a new contract with the school board as they continue working under a contract agreement that expired last summer. The board spoke publicly about the situation Friday, saying it has negotiated in good faith.

The board also claimed union leadership engaged in behaviors that weren't "supportive of students or parents" by exerting "constant pressure" on school officials to remain fully remote last school year. Read the board's full statement here.

"Even earlier this month, the PTHEA Leadership requested that the district send students home at lunch and run an early dismissal schedule for an indeterminate period," the board said in a two-page statement. "None of this behavior is supportive of students or parents and fails to recognize what all health officials and educators have indicated, children need to be in school.”

PTHEA President Joseph Kyle responded that the board's statement resorted to "outright distortions and exaggerations."

The board's negotiations team met with the union and a state-appointed mediator for the second time Jan. 24. But they didn't come to an agreement on contract negotiations, according to the board.

The school board proposed salary increases of 3 percent for the 2020-21 school year, 3.1 percent for 2021-22 and 3.1 percent for the 2022-23 school year. But the PTHEA countered with a proposal of a 3.56 percent increase for each of the three school years, according to the board.

"The district is required to adhere to a 2% tax levy increase which funds all of our educational programming," the board's statement said. "The BOE should not have to find itself in a position where cuts to staffing and programs are the only option - this is not good for students or staff."

But staffing shortages have impacted schools across New Jersey and the nation, union leadership said in a Jan. 20 letter to the editor.

"If we are going to continue to have the best public schools in the nation, we must offer competitive salaries and benefits to attract and retain the best educators," union leadership wrote.

Parsippany's school board listed several examples in which "teachers have received both respect and consideration for the job they do," including the following:

But Kyle remained unmoved by the statement.

"Although one side sometimes resorts to outright distortions and exaggerations in some struggles in the business world, it is very disturbing to see the Parsippany Board of Education take such a step," the union president told Patch via email. "Since our profession is the education of children, we must lead first by example, and the Board's message teaches our students all the wrong lessons about ethical and good faith bargaining."

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Parsippany Teacher's Union Breaks Silence On Contract Talks

In a letter to the editor, education-association leadership says they've been working under a contract agreement that expired last summer.The following is a letter to the editor submitted by the Parsippany Troy-Hills Education Association's executive board, on behalf of its members. Sitting officials and representatives of public-sector unions may submit letters to the editor to [email protected] Members of the public can submit a letter to the editor by ...

In a letter to the editor, education-association leadership says they've been working under a contract agreement that expired last summer.

The following is a letter to the editor submitted by the Parsippany Troy-Hills Education Association's executive board, on behalf of its members. Sitting officials and representatives of public-sector unions may submit letters to the editor to [email protected] Members of the public can submit a letter to the editor by publishing here.

An open letter to the Parsippany-Troy Hills community:

After much deliberation, the members of the Parsippany Troy-Hills Education Association (PTHEA) have decided to break their silence on the status of negotiations with the Parsippany Troy-Hills Board of Education. The PTHEA has been working under an expired agreement since July 2021. For months, we chose to refrain from any public statements, as well as to exercise our right to pressure the Board and engage in any job actions, in the hopes that we could bargain amicably and successfully. PTHEA members understand the challenges brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic, and we felt that all energies would be best served by strengthening the labor-management relationship as we returned to in-person instruction. We believe it takes all stakeholders to ensure a positive, successful educational experience for our students.

The PTHEA held out hope that the Board believed this, too. In an effort to have contract talks be one less stressor for all, the PTHEA in late 2020 offered the Board a full year of labor peace — with no contract demands or changes — and a salary adjustment at the current county average. While there were certainly contractual items we also wanted to address, PTHEA members were dedicated to maintaining a positive relationship, so we may all concentrate on doing the job we loved as we navigated the “new normal.” Unfortunately, the Board didn’t feel the same way: They delayed the first meeting by nearly three months beyond what is normal, rejected our one-year offer and introduced a slate of contractual demands that go far and above what any of us have seen in decades.

To say we were disappointed is an understatement. For the last 18 months, we have done everything possible to maintain the quality educational experience our community has come to expect. However, we must insist that Board recognize our role in doing so. Across the state and throughout the nation, there is an educator shortage, which has only been compounded by the ongoing pandemic. If we are going to continue to have the best public schools in the nation, we must offer competitive salaries and benefits to attract and retain the best educators. This profession is rife with challenges and — once this pandemic is finally behind us — there are going to be additional obstacles ahead, and it will take the hard work of public school educators to maintain stability for all. Instead of publicly praising us while privately scoffing at our attempts to secure a contract which actually acknowledges our value to this school district, it’s time for the Parsippany Troy-Hills Board to come to the table with reasonable proposals. No more delays; no more games—we want their actions to finally support their words.

Until this is resolved, please be assured that all PTHEA members are committed to providing Parsippany Troy Hills’s students with nothing less than our best. In fact, we go above and beyond our contractual responsibilities for the students and school community every single day. However, we are equally as committed to standing up and demanding a fair and equitable settlement, and we hope you join us in that effort and call on the Board to offer one. Together, we can keep Parsippany Troy-Hills a place of pride for all.

Respectfully,

The Executive Board of the Parsippany-Troy Hills Education Association, on behalf of its members

Parsippany School Buses Going Greener Thanks To Federal Funding

The Parsippany-Troy Hills School District will replace 10 buses from its fleet with low-emission vehicles.PARSIPPANY, NJ — Parsippany's fleet of school buses is going a little greener. The Parsippany-Troy Hills School District will receive federal funding for 10 low-emission buses to replace old diesel vehicles.The Environmental Protection Agency allocated $10 million in rebates this year for school districts to replace diesel school buses with new electric, diesel, gas, propane or compressed-natural-gas vehicles that m...

The Parsippany-Troy Hills School District will replace 10 buses from its fleet with low-emission vehicles.

PARSIPPANY, NJ — Parsippany's fleet of school buses is going a little greener. The Parsippany-Troy Hills School District will receive federal funding for 10 low-emission buses to replace old diesel vehicles.

The Environmental Protection Agency allocated $10 million in rebates this year for school districts to replace diesel school buses with new electric, diesel, gas, propane or compressed-natural-gas vehicles that meet emissions standards. This year's rebates include $200,000 for Parsippany schools to get 10 new buses.

The EPA's funding for the endeavor comes from the 2021 Diesel Emissions Reduction Act. The agency set a tentative timeline for school districts and bus contractors to order the vehicles by the end of May, with delivery by the end of October.

Parsippany schools will receive newer, environmentally cleaner buses powered by certified 2017-or-newer model year diesel engines. The vehicles fall under the category of "clean school buses," reducing emissions.

The EPA also rewarded 11 school districts with a combined $7 million for new, zero-emission electric school buses. The funds come from the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 — a federal coronavirus-relief package signed into law last year.

The Infrastructure Investments and Jobs Act — often called the Bipartisan Infrastructure Bill, signed into law last November — will also give the EPA $5 billion over five years to replace school buses with cleaner models.

“I am proud to have supported the American Rescue Plan and the Diesel Emissions Reduction Act, which are helping New Jersey schools replace old diesel buses with low or zero-emission buses, starting with Parsippany here in my district,” said Rep. Mikie Sherrill. “This is a great step in our effort to fight climate change, transition to green infrastructure, and protect the health of our children.

Schools buses travel billions of miles per year, transporting 25 million American children to and from school each day, according to the EPA. The diesel exhaust from buses also negatively impacts health, especially for children who breathe more quickly than adults and don't have fully developed lungs, the EPA said.

While new buses must meet the agency's tougher emission standards, many older vehicles continue to emit significant diesel exhaust.

Transportation accounted for 29 percent of U.S. greenhouse-gas emissions in 2019 — just ahead of electricity (25 percent) and industry (23 percent) — according to the EPA.

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