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Latest News in Hanover, NJ

Hanover Park puts $44M plan to fix aging high schools before voters

At Hanover Park High School, the walkways are rusting and heating pipes have bust. At its sister school in Whippany Park, the roof is crumbling and broken windows dot the facade, according to district officials. Heating systems that date back to the 1950s and 60s periodically fail.The Hanover Park Regional School District says the sc...

At Hanover Park High School, the walkways are rusting and heating pipes have bust. At its sister school in Whippany Park, the roof is crumbling and broken windows dot the facade, according to district officials. Heating systems that date back to the 1950s and 60s periodically fail.

The Hanover Park Regional School District says the schools are badly in need of work, so it's asking voters to approve a $44.4 million plan to make upgrades.

Residents in Hanover Township, East Hanover and Florham Park, the three towns served by the district, will go to the polls next Tuesday, Dec. 13, to vote on the proposal.

Infrastructure in both schools "are original from the buildings’ inceptions and are being used on a continual basis," the district says on its website. "Repairs have become costly; and sometimes, cost-prohibitive. We have now reached the point that we must invest a considerable amount of money to make necessary improvements. This investment is expected to mitigate future costs for the district and its taxpayers."

The district would issue bonds to fund the project, to be repaid over 30 years. But state funding would cover about 40% of the cost if the referendum is approved.

Hanover Park's school repair plans

The money would pay for new roofs, windows and exterior doors and air-conditioning at both schools, according to a summary posted online. Heating and ventilation systems would be repaired and the two buildings would get new security vestibules outside their entrances. At Hanover Park High, a boiler room would be converted into a new STEAM (science, technology, engineering, art and math) lab; a similar lab is already in development at Whippany Park.

About $28.1 million would be spent at Hanover Park and $16.3 million at Whippany.

Impact on taxes

The project would add $20.71 to property taxes for every $100,000 of assessed value for Florham Park homeowners, $28.12 in Hanover and $29.12 in East Hanover, according to school officials.

But taxpayers' actual bills would go down in four of the next five years, they said, because debt costs from previous projects are also coming off the books. According to the district, taxpayers in each town would save anywhere from $1 to $5 a year through 2025 and then about $30 a year starting in 2027 if the referendum passes.

That's based on average assessed values of $366,000 in East Hanover, $425,000 in Hanover and $658,000 in Florham Park.

Development:East Hanover mayor laments huge housing project: 'I lose sleep over what's happening'

For subscribers:Red Bulls score approval for 81-acre HQ in Morris County. Here's a look at revised plans

How to vote

The district has posted more details on the proposed upgrades, an FAQ, design renderings and other information at www.hpreg.org.

The vote will be held from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Tuesday at polling locations around the three towns, with mail-in ballots also an option. Voters can find their polling places using the state Division of Elections' Polling Place Search site.

Alex Nussbaum is a staff writer and assignment editor.

Email: [email protected]

Hanover mayor, deputy mayor to be selected Thursday night

HANOVER TWP. – The all-Republican Township Committee will vote to select the 2023 mayor and deputy mayor from among its members at 6 p.m., Thursday, Jan. 6 during its reorganization meeting at the municipal building.Current Deputy Mayor Thomas “Ace” Gallagher and Committeeman Ronald Francioli will be sworn in to their fourth and 15th three-year terms, respectively.As Hanover Township’s governing body is a committee form of government, the committee members will need to elect one of their...

HANOVER TWP. – The all-Republican Township Committee will vote to select the 2023 mayor and deputy mayor from among its members at 6 p.m., Thursday, Jan. 6 during its reorganization meeting at the municipal building.

Current Deputy Mayor Thomas “Ace” Gallagher and Committeeman Ronald Francioli will be sworn in to their fourth and 15th three-year terms, respectively.

As Hanover Township’s governing body is a committee form of government, the committee members will need to elect one of their own as mayor, as opposed to a council where the mayor is voted on directly by the public.

Ferramosca was first chosen mayor in July 2020 when he took over for Francioli who stepped down but remained on the committee.

Ferramosca was unanimously re-elected mayor at the 2021 reorganization meeting last January, when fellow Committeeman Thomas “Ace” Gallagher was unanimously elected deputy mayor. The pair were unanimously re-elected to these positions during the 2022 reorganization meeting.

There are five committee members, and the other members eligible for election are Brian Cahill and Michael Mihalko.

Francioli, who is retired but owned a public relations firm, has served as mayor, most recently in 2021. After his next term, he will have served 45 consecutive years on the committee.

He served as CEO of the public relations firm Francioli, Richartz, Weiman and Fliss from inception in 1982 until his retirement around 2006.

He said before the election the fact that he and Gallagher are running uncontested is a testament that the people of Hanover Township like what’s going on with the government that’s in place.

“I think my role is going to take on a different direction, and I think given my years of service on the team, I’ll probably be looked at more as a senior member of the governing body and be looked at more for the experience that I’ve had and some of the things that I’ve experienced over time that we’re experiencing again,” Francioli said.

The current term’s accomplishments Francioli noted include Fair Share Housing; Fancioli said the committee came up with a reasonable and equitable solution, which was a team effort.

Also, the committee members managed to keep the township remaining fiscally sound through the COVID-19 pandemic and were able to keep tax hikes under two percent.

That in of itself was a feat and it was aided by the fact the township is one of the few Morris County municipalities that has no debt.

“I have said many, many times, it is a true honor to serve on the Hanover Township Committee,” said Gallagher, the owner of Ace Gallagher Stump Grinding in Morristown. “My first day on the committee, I made it very clear that I serve on Hanover Township’s Township Committee.

“In my opinion, it is all about public service. I pledged to all of Hanover Township’s residents that I would treat the people of Hanover Township and this office with the utmost respect, the respect our residents and this office deserves.

“I also pledged to work as hard as humanly possible everyday to serve all the people of Hanover Township. As an incumbent, and seeking re-election I have asked to be judged on the way I have represented the people of Hanover Township and the pledge I made on my first day.

“The fact that this is now an uncontested election is a true honor and and I truly appreciate the confidence the Hanover Township residents have in me. I will not let up on working as hard as I can everyday and I will continue to be available to every resident every day for any reason. Thank you very much for the continued support and confidence.”

Hanover Park boys basketball coach Todd Hartman finally earns 300th win

For Todd Hartman, basketball has always been about family. His parents came to all his games, whether he was playing for Mount Olive, County College of Morris, or The College of New Jersey. And Hartman's players have been like his sons, absorbing his tough love, coming back for alumni games and even inviting him to weddings.That meant plenty of calls, emails and texts when Hartman finally earned his 300th win, 77-72, on Tuesday night at Parsippany Hills. After the post-game handshake line, the Hornets presented Hartman ...

For Todd Hartman, basketball has always been about family. His parents came to all his games, whether he was playing for Mount Olive, County College of Morris, or The College of New Jersey. And Hartman's players have been like his sons, absorbing his tough love, coming back for alumni games and even inviting him to weddings.

That meant plenty of calls, emails and texts when Hartman finally earned his 300th win, 77-72, on Tuesday night at Parsippany Hills. After the post-game handshake line, the Hornets presented Hartman with a commemorative basketball and a black-and-gold banner.

"I've been able to do something I love for a really long time, and have some level of success at it," he said. "On that level, it's a good feeling. I love what I do."

It's been a challenging wait for Hartman, who wanted his players "to focus on their seasons and not some thing of mine." Hanover Park had lost five straight games, and eight out of 10 en route to the milestone.

But Hartman has rarely picked the smooth path.

Baseball came easy to him growing up, but he fell in love with basketball. He watched the Celtics-Lakers rivalry on TV in the 1980s, studying Magic Johnson, James Worthy, Larry Bird, Kevin McHale and the rest of the classic rosters. The basketball court became Hartman's haven from anxiety, a "place of comfort."

But he was a scrawny kid, and got cut from the seventh- and eighth-grade team. A growth spurt from 5-foot-8 to 6-foot-6 during the summer before his junior year at Mount Olive helped boost his prospects.

He played at CCM, becoming a captain in his second season. He was also named captain at TCNJ. Hartman, who admitted he "wasn't a kid who particularly loved school," earned a degree in health and physical education hoping to stay close to basketball.

"It's a close-up sport," he said. "Football, you're wearing helmets. Baseball, you're so far away from each other. In basketball, if someone knows he can beat you, you can read it on his face. It's under bright lights and you're wearing shorts. You've got to be ready to play. There's something so pure and beautiful about that."

Hartman's first coaching job was for Vic Paternostro, the legendary Pope John football coach. Paternostro pointed at the quarterback and receivers and told Hartman, "That's your new toy. Go play with it. Just don't break your toy." He also warned Hartman against becoming friends with the players, because they need to be coached.

In 1997, Hartman succeeded another legend, his former coach Jack Martin, at CCM. Their often contentious relationship formed the "tough but fair" model Hartman uses with his current players.

He moved to Hanover Park in 2004 to teach and coach boys basketball.

"People said, 'Don't go there. It's a tough rebuild. It's a wrestling school,'" Hartman recalled. "I like when people tell me not to do something."

The Hornets may think Hartman lives in his cramped office off the gym. He arrives two hours before practice, and stays until he hears the last ball stop bouncing outside the usually open door. Hartman has multiple group texts for former players, because his phone doesn't allow him to keep all the numbers grouped together.

"He really found himself," said Martin, who earned a 569-225 record in 30 years of coaching.

"I was happy about that, because I really liked him. He was a very hard worker, very determined. We struggled a little bit, but once we got things going, he found out he had potential to do great things. It turned out to be a pretty good story."

Home-court advantage

The wall behind Hartman's desk is decorated with photos of past NJAC divisional champions, alongside his two blonde daughters growing up. Jaylin Hartman, a senior forward at Blair, signed a National Letter of Intent with George Washington. Ryleigh, 12, is a lefty point guard at Mendham Township Middle School, "a shooter (with) her own style of play," according to her proud father.

Before Jaylin started at Blair, Todd Hartman was thinking about retiring from coaching so he could be in the stands at her games like his parents had been. Jaylin thought the idea was "so dumb. ... You need to be a coach. That's what you do" Also, most of Blair's games are livestreamed so they could still break down her film together afterward. Ryleigh, a seventh-grader, is more laid back than her focused, driven older sister, but Todd Hartman said, "She's like, 'Whatever,' then goes out there and flies around and dominates."

Over Winter Break, Jaylin got a chance to watch some Hanover Park games and even took photos. She hopes to go into broadcast or photojournalism, and is compiling a scrapbook for her dad.

"I'm excited and proud. I think his next goal should be 500 wins," she said. "It shows he's not crazy and he knows what he's talking about. All those long nights, getting home late during the season, were all worth it, because he's making victories for both the kids and him. I just want to see more."

Jane Havsy is a storyteller for the Daily Record and DailyRecord.com, part of the USA TODAY Network. For full access to live scores, breaking news and analysis, subscribe today.

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Campbell Appoints Carrie Anderson Chief Financial Officer

Newsroom CAMDEN, N.J.–(BUSINESS WIRE)– Campbell Soup Company (NYSE:CPB) today announced the appointment of Carrie L. Anderson as Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, effective Feb. 6.Anderson will lead Campbell’s finance function, including controllership, corporate financial planning and analysis, corporate strategy and development, tax, treasury, internal audit, investor relations, transact...

Newsroom

CAMDEN, N.J.–(BUSINESS WIRE)– Campbell Soup Company (NYSE:CPB) today announced the appointment of Carrie L. Anderson as Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, effective Feb. 6.

Anderson will lead Campbell’s finance function, including controllership, corporate financial planning and analysis, corporate strategy and development, tax, treasury, internal audit, investor relations, transactional services and financial systems. She will report to Campbell’s President and Chief Executive Officer Mark Clouse and become a member of the company’s Operating Committee and a Corporate Officer. Anderson succeeds Mick Beekhuizen, who was appointed President of Campbell’s Meals & Beverages division in November 2022.

“I am delighted to welcome Carrie to our leadership team. She brings a wide range of diverse, strategic experience and financial discipline, and her expertise in capital management and deployment will help us continue to drive our growth plans and enhance our performance,” said Clouse. “Her collaborative approach combined with a track record of driving transformation, delivering results and developing strong finance teams will be invaluable as we continue to build momentum in the business.”

Anderson brings a wealth of financial experience working in a variety of complex industries, as well as a background in manufacturing and engineering. She joins Campbell from Integra LifeSciences (NASDAQ:IART), a leading global medical technology company, where she has served as Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer since 2019. Before Integra, Anderson spent seven years with Dover Corporation in several leadership roles, including Chief Accounting Officer/Corporate Controller, and Vice President and CFO for the company’s engineered systems and printing and identification businesses. Previously, Anderson spent six years as Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Delphi Product & Service Solutions, a division of Delphi Corporation. While at Delphi, she also held leadership positions in finance, treasury and investor relations. Anderson started her career with General Motors.

Anderson earned her B.S. in chemical engineering from Purdue University and an MBA from Ball State University. She serves on the board of directors of Embecta Corp. (NASDAQ:EMBC) and is a member of its Audit and Nominating & Governance committees.

About Campbell Soup Company

For more than 150 years, Campbell (NYSE: CPB) has been connecting people through food they love. Generations of consumers have trusted Campbell to provide delicious and affordable food and beverages. Headquartered in Camden, N.J. since 1869, Campbell generated fiscal 2022 net sales of nearly $8.6 billion. Our portfolio includes iconic brands such as Campbell’s, Cape Cod, Goldfish, Kettle Brand, Lance, Late July, Milano, Pace, Pacific Foods, Pepperidge Farm, Prego, Snyder’s of Hanover, Swanson and V8. Campbell has a heritage of giving back and acting as a good steward of the environment. The company is a member of the Standard & Poor’s 500 as well as the FTSE4Good and Bloomberg Gender-Equality Indices. For more information, visit www.campbellsoupcompany.com or follow company news on Twitter via @CampbellSoupCo.

Undercover Snacks Launches Enterprise-wide at Publix

The innovative woman-owned snack manufacturer has launched its Chocolate Quinoa Crisps across Publix Super Markets.EAST HANOVER, N.J., Jan. 13, 2023 /PRNewswire/ -- Undercover Snacks, the rapidly growing NJ-based manufacturer of unbelievably delicious, crazy-crispy chocolate snacks that are secretly better for you, announced today that Publix Super Markets has launched three of their phenomenally delicious flavors enterprise-wide. Publix is now carrying Undercover's 2 oz bags of Dark Chocolate + Sea Salt, Milk Chocolate, and Da...

The innovative woman-owned snack manufacturer has launched its Chocolate Quinoa Crisps across Publix Super Markets.

EAST HANOVER, N.J., Jan. 13, 2023 /PRNewswire/ -- Undercover Snacks, the rapidly growing NJ-based manufacturer of unbelievably delicious, crazy-crispy chocolate snacks that are secretly better for you, announced today that Publix Super Markets has launched three of their phenomenally delicious flavors enterprise-wide. Publix is now carrying Undercover's 2 oz bags of Dark Chocolate + Sea Salt, Milk Chocolate, and Dark Chocolate + Blueberries, offering consumers across the Southeast an incredible new snacking experience.

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"We believe launching in Publix is a game changer," said Diana Levy, Founder, Co-Owner and CEO of Undercover Snacks. "Our products will now be available in the largest supermarket chain in the Southeast, and one of the largest chains in the country, giving consumers an additional 1900 retail locations to purchase our delicious allergy-friendly snacks. Being selected by Publix affirms our belief that our unique product offering, coupled with our enormous capacity to manufacture will enable us to continue to achieve expansive growth in a rapidly evolving snack market."

About Undercover Snacks:

Undercover Snacks is a covert operation, crafting delicious chocolate snacks that are secretly better for you. Satisfying even the truest chocoholics, Undercover Snacks offers tasty, guilt-free, gluten-free and allergen-friendly treats with superfood protein and lower sugar and calories. The WBENC-certified woman-owned company was launched in 2017 by CEO & Founder Diana Levy, who sought an innovative solution for her own healthier chocolate cravings, and those of her 2-out-of 3 daughters diagnosed with Celiac Disease. Undercover is safely made in the company's own custom engineered, SQF-certified chocolate factory located in East Hanover, New Jersey. Find all nine flavors of Undercover's award winning dark and milk chocolate-covered crispy quinoa snacks on Amazon.com, UndercoverSnacks.com, and over 15,000 stores including all Kroger banners, Publix, Whole Foods, Albertsons, CVS, Rite-Aid, and an expanding number of natural, specialty and grocery retailers. They are also frequently available in snack boxes onboard United and other airlines.

Media Contact:Arielle Levy[email protected] 973-665-8152

SOURCE Undercover Chocolate Company LLC

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