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Latest News in Boonton Township, NJ

Where’s my money? Answers about NJ ANCHOR rebate

You have questions, we get you the answers.New Jersey: Asked & Answered is your chance to get the answers to some of New Jersey's most vexing questions.We have been receiving a lot of questions about the new ANCHOR property tax rebate program. Below are the answers to the questions you are asking.ANCHOR stands for Affordable New Jersey Communities for Homeowners and Renters. It replaces the Homestead Benefit program and expands the amount of property tax relief eligible homeowners and renters can rec...

You have questions, we get you the answers.

New Jersey: Asked & Answered is your chance to get the answers to some of New Jersey's most vexing questions.

We have been receiving a lot of questions about the new ANCHOR property tax rebate program. Below are the answers to the questions you are asking.

ANCHOR stands for Affordable New Jersey Communities for Homeowners and Renters. It replaces the Homestead Benefit program and expands the amount of property tax relief eligible homeowners and renters can receive. It also expands the income limits to qualify.

The state sent mailers to homeowners in September 2022. It included instructions and forms to file by mail, or online. No additional mailings are planned. If you do not apply before the deadline, no benefits will be paid.

Eligibility was expanded beyond the old Homestead Rebate program

? Homeowners with income of $150,000 or less will receive $1,500

? Homeowners with income of more than $150,000 and up to $250,000 will receive $1,000

? Renters with income of $150,000 or less will receive $450

The original deadline to apply has passed, but Gov. Phil Murphy has extended the deadline to Feb. 28, 2023

You will need to go online and request your PIN. However, in order to complete the form, you will need to upload a copy of your New Jersey license or government-issued photo ID. If you do not upload a copy of a valid photo ID, the form will not be accepted and you will not get your PIN.

You can access the form HERE.

You can find your gross income on line 29 of your 2019 NJ-1040 tax return. If you were not required to file a 2019 New Jersey Income Tax return, report zero as your gross income.

If you do not have a copy of your 2019 NJ-1040 tax return, you will have to complete the "Gross Income Request Form."

Please note, you will have to upload your New Jersey license or government-issued photo ID. If you do not upload a copy of a valid photo ID, the form will not be accepted and you will not get your information.

You can access the form HERE.

Unlike the Homestead rebate, which was applied as a credit to your tax bill, the ANCHOR benefits are paid directly to the homeowner or renter. ANCHOR benefits will be paid through direct deposit or with a paper check.

The state has offered no specific dates but says the money will go out in late spring of 2023. When you file has no bearing on when you will be paid.

No. There are some instances where you will need to file a paper application.

For example:

? You shared ownership of your main home with someone who was not your spouse/civil union partner and your percentage of ownership is not preprinted on your worksheet.

? Your main home was a unit in a multi-unit property that you owned.

? You received an ANCHOR information mailer for the correct property, but the name on the mailer is not yours or needs to be changed due to marriage, death, etc.

? You are a widow(er)/surviving civil union partner and your deed lists both your name and the name of your deceased spouse.

? You are an executor filing on behalf of a deceased homeowner.

? You occupied a newly constructed home on October 1 for which you did not receive an ANCHOR mailer with an Identification Number and PIN.

? You are considered a homeowner for purposes of applying for the ANCHOR benefit, but you were not the actual owner of record on October 1.

? You and your spouse/civil union partner maintained the same main home and require separate ANCHOR benefit payments.

? You are filing for a property held in trust. (You are considered an eligible owner of a property owned by a trust if you are a beneficiary, or the deed or trust agreement explicitly states that you have a life estate in the property.)

Most homeowners filing paper applications will need to include supporting documentation to verify eligibility.

Yes, but good luck.

There is a hotline number to call: 1-888-238-1233, but many New Jersey 101.5 listeners say they have had to wait an hour or more to get through.

With the deadline a month away, the call volume is expected to get worse.

Melinda Caliendo, a spokeswoman for the New Jersey Department of the Treasury, told New Jersey 101.5 “we are aware that some taxpayers have been unable to speak with a representative from the ANCHOR hotline, and we recognize and understand their frustration.”

Caliendo says they are hiring and training more workers to deal with the massive call volume.

Montville Boys Basketball Receive the No. 17 Seed in Morris County Tournament

MONTVILLE, NJ - The Montville Township High School boys basketball team is the No. 17 seed in the Morris County Tournament. West Morris is the top seed in the field, with Delbarton, Chatham, Pequannock and Mendham rounding out the top five.The Mustangs will travel to face No. 16 seed Parsippany Hills in the preliminary round on Saturday, Jan. 28 at 10 a.m. The winner of that game will travel to play No. 1 seed West Morris on Thursday, Feb. 2.The tournament quarterfinals will be played on Feb. 4 at Randolph High School. The Coun...

MONTVILLE, NJ - The Montville Township High School boys basketball team is the No. 17 seed in the Morris County Tournament. West Morris is the top seed in the field, with Delbarton, Chatham, Pequannock and Mendham rounding out the top five.

The Mustangs will travel to face No. 16 seed Parsippany Hills in the preliminary round on Saturday, Jan. 28 at 10 a.m. The winner of that game will travel to play No. 1 seed West Morris on Thursday, Feb. 2.

The tournament quarterfinals will be played on Feb. 4 at Randolph High School. The County College of Morris hosts the semifinals on Feb. 11 and then the finals on Feb. 18.

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The Morris County Tournament Boys Basketball seeds are:

No 1- West Morris

No 2 - Delbarton

No 9- Madison

No 10 - Morris Hills

No 11 - Morristown

No 12 - Randolph

No 13 - Hanover Park

No 14 - Roxbury

No 15 - Kinnelon

No 16 - Parsippany Hills

No 17- Montville

No 18 - Boonton

No 19 - Mount Olive

No 20 - Mountain Lakes

No 21 - Butler

No 22 - Dover

No 23 - Parsippany

No 24 - Whippany Park

No 25 - Morristown Beard

No 26- Morris County Tech

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Boys Basketball: Results, recaps, photos and links for Friday, Dec. 30

FRIDAY, DEC. 30Featured LinksThe N.J. High School Sports newsletter now appearing in mailboxes 5 days a week. Sign up now and be among the first to get all the boys and girls sports you care about, straight to your inbox each weekday. FEATURED COVERAGENewark East Side 46, No. 15 Arts 37St. Rose 47, Red Bank Regional 26TOP 20 SCOREBOARDSTATEWIDE SCOREBOARDFriday, Dec. 30Atlantic Tech 55, Merge...

FRIDAY, DEC. 30

Featured Links

The N.J. High School Sports newsletter now appearing in mailboxes 5 days a week. Sign up now and be among the first to get all the boys and girls sports you care about, straight to your inbox each weekday.

FEATURED COVERAGE

Newark East Side 46, No. 15 Arts 37

St. Rose 47, Red Bank Regional 26

TOP 20 SCOREBOARD

STATEWIDE SCOREBOARD

Friday, Dec. 30

Atlantic Tech 55, Mergenthaler Vocational Technical High School 37 - Box Score

Rumson-Fair Haven 35, Trenton Catholic 32 - Box Score

Rutgers Prep 69, Neumann Goretti (PA) 55 - Box Score

Cliffside Park 73, Bergen Charter 27 - Box Score

Lakeland 72, American Christian 71 - Box Score

West Windsor-Plainsboro South 48, Southern 42 - Box Score

Jackson Memorial 60, Freehold Township 48 - Box Score

Colts Neck 65, Red Bank Catholic 52 - Box Score

Brick Memorial 69, Marlboro 58 - Box Score

BCSL

West Windsor-Plainsboro North 78, STEMCivics 21 - Box Score

City School (PA) 53, Delran 47 - Box Score

Shipley (PA) 61, Doane Academy 49 - Box Score

BIG NORTH

Passaic Valley 61, McNair 50 - Box Score

Dickinson 47, Ridgefield Park 46 - Box Score

Pascack Valley 47, Ridgewood 45 - Box Score

St. Mary (Ruth.) 47, Paramus 45 - Box Score

CAPE-ATLANTIC

Middle Township 58, South Lakes (Va.) 48 - Box Score

Egg Harbor 68, Frankford (PA) 44 - Box Score

COLONIAL

Cinnaminson 59, Gloucester 49 - Box Score

CVC

West Windsor-Plainsboro North 78, STEMCivics 21 - Box Score

GMC

Carteret 64, Manalapan 38 - Box Score

HCIAL

Dickinson 47, Ridgefield Park 46 - Box Score

NJAC

Delaware Valley 85, North Warren 65 - Box Score

NJIC

Hasbrouck Heights 47, Pompton Lakes 30 - Box Score

St. Mary (Ruth.) 47, Paramus 45 - Box Score

SHORE

Neptune 56, Pioneer Academy 41 - Box Score

Freehold Borough 53, Brick Township 44 - Box Score

Point Pleasant Beach 56, Monmouth 49 - Box Score

SKYLAND

Delaware Valley 85, North Warren 65 - Box Score

TRI-COUNTY

UCC

Independent

Neptune 56, Pioneer Academy 41 - Box Score

Bard 62, Paterson Arts 28 - Box Score

Westampton Tech 66, KIPP Cooper Norcross Academy 51 - Box Score

City School (PA) 53, Delran 47 - Box Score

Middle Township 58, South Lakes (Va.) 48 - Box Score

Egg Harbor 68, Frankford (PA) 44 - Box Score

Shipley (PA) 61, Doane Academy 49 - Box Score

The N.J. High School Sports newsletter now appearing in mailboxes 5 days a week. Sign up now and be among the first to get all the boys and girls sports you care about, straight to your inbox each weekday. To add your name, click here.

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Boonton council rejects retail cannabis zone shift at marathon meeting

BOONTON - More than 70% of Boonton residents voted in favor of legalizing retail sales of recreational marijuana two years ago. Their elected leaders quickly followed suit, passing an ordinance by a 7-1 margin to legalize retail cannabis sales in town earlier this year.But it turns out some Boontonites - and others ...

BOONTON - More than 70% of Boonton residents voted in favor of legalizing retail sales of recreational marijuana two years ago. Their elected leaders quickly followed suit, passing an ordinance by a 7-1 margin to legalize retail cannabis sales in town earlier this year.

But it turns out some Boontonites - and others who have children attending parochial schools in town - are very particular about exactly where they want those shops to exist.

Many of them packed a marathon council meeting Monday to speak out ahead of an ordinance vote by the council to extend the existing cannabis commercial zone to include Division Street. The expansion would include a vacant building desired by a provisional retail cannabis licensee, a few hundred feet from downtown Main Street.

Following a public-comment period lasting more than three hours, the council failed to pass the ordinance by a 5-4 vote.

Councilmember and former Mayor Cy Wekilsky reiterated his stance that retail cannabis sales were "not something we ought to have here." Councilmember Michael Wade agreed, "for a lot of reasons."

"If we need this to balance the budget, then shame on us," Wade said.

The public comment was a mix of for and against. Several residents spoke out about the benefits of added tax revenue and a business that would bring shoppers into town. Others worried about traffic on the narrow road, security and the proximity to schools. One angry resident opposed to retail cannabis sales referred to the elected officials as the "Wu-Tang Council," invoking the name of the pro-cannabis hip-hop band.

Mayor Rich Corcoran and Councilmember Marie Devenezia both said prior to the meeting, they received many emails from people out of town who were against the ordinance. Many of the out-of-towners, they said, were parents of students at Our Lady of Mount Carmel School and its Lumen Gentium Academy for high school students on Birch Street.

Noting almost 75% of her Ward 2 constituents voted in favor of legal retail cannabis, Devenezia said "I'm going to listen to the voices of Boonton first." She added she suffers from chronic arthritis pain and while the medications prescribed to her put her liver, kidneys and heart at risk, "cannabis poses none of those risks."

Corcoran was more blunt about the critics from out of town and his own council.

"I thank you all for coming out but what do I do about the 3,359 people in this town who came out in November and voted [for retail cannabis sales]?" he said. "They have a say. They provided a direction for this board."

Morris County newsEx-staffer at Morris Plains senior center sentenced to prison for 'horrendous' assault

He also turned his ire on Wade. "I couldn't disagree with you more," Cocoran said. "And if we don't pass this tonight, we are going to have to make drastic cuts to our budget. We're going to have to lay people off, and it's going to be you and me going to tell them that."

Corcoran added he has three children attending Mount Carmel and to be sure, he personally measured the distance from all schools in town to the proposed Division Street shop, and they were all in excess of the statutory 1,000-foot buffer.

The same council voted 7-1 in July "to go forward to look into" a request by Boone Town Provisions at its July 5 meeting to expand the commercial zone off Myrtle Avenue on the north end of town established by the council for retail cannabis shops. That vote followed a presentation from Boone Town chief legal advisor Justin Singer detailing the company's proposal to open in a Division Street building formerly occupied by Boonton Electric.

Singer returned to the council Tuesday to again explain that the company was unable to find a property within the existing zone that was suitable for their purpose. He also explained that suggested alternate sites, including the abandoned iHop near Walmart, presented security issues due to adjoining tenants.

Larger shopping centers also typically receive financing from larger banks with restrictive covenants that do not allow leases to cannabis sellers because it is still considered an illegal drug by the federal government,

"I get it, this is a new industry and people have questions," Singer said.

Corcoran warned that six other towns in Morris County alone have approved retail cannabis sales and there are a limited number of licenses being issued. He noted neighboring Boonton Township is already reaping up to $500,000 a quarter in added tax revenue from the cannabis growing facility in the township.

"So about a third of their budget is now going to be paid by cannabis," he said.

Seven towns in Morris County - Boonton, Butler, Dover, Morristown, Rockaway, Rockaway Township and Victory Gardens - have approved retail cannabis sales, but none have yet to see a dispensary approved and opened. Elsewhere around the state, 20 cannabis dispensaries have opened since retail recreational sales began in New Jersey in April.

Boonton reopens Pepe Field after two-year, $525K makeover at former Superfund site

BOONTON — The troubled and toxic history of Pepe Field and Playground may finally be over after the neighborhood park, once shuttered for decades as a toxic federal Superfund site, was rededicated this week after a second extended renovation."It had been closed for the pandemic," said Town Council member Marie Deven...

BOONTON — The troubled and toxic history of Pepe Field and Playground may finally be over after the neighborhood park, once shuttered for decades as a toxic federal Superfund site, was rededicated this week after a second extended renovation.

"It had been closed for the pandemic," said Town Council member Marie Devenezia. "It was reopened but then closed in 2020 because the existing equipment had become very dilapidated. There was a lot of broken equipment and things that were deemed to be unsafe to play on. They were removed."

The site was reopened during an evening ceremony on Wednesday attended by local officials and more than 100 residents who live near the 3.5-acre park at the end of Wootton Street in Upper Boonton.

Council member Edina Renfro-Michel, the liaison to the town parks and recreation committee, said it took a few years to appropriate funds from the budget without raising taxes to cover the $525,000 makeover, which included a cushioned surface and new playground equipment such as slides, seated spinners and a rope bridge.

The basketball court was completely replaced, as the crumbling old surface could no longer be repaired.

Delays in equipment deliveries extended the closure to nearly two years, though with the planning and budgeting required, "I've been working on this for four years," Renfro-Michel said.

The dedication opened with a performance by Boonton's Harmony Senior Drum Corps. Seeing a crowd of anxious kids gathering at the gate, Mayor Richard Corcoran then sped through his speech and a ribbon-cutting.

"It's been a four-year journey for some of us," he said. "Please use it, enjoy it and be respectful."

With that invitation, the gates opened and the playground filled with dozens of children who ran for their favorite attractions. Parents hovered around taking photos and videos.

Development:Plan for Parsippany's first Chick-fil-A advances. Why that has some residents up in arms

Tri-Town Little League provided refreshments for the event. The baseball diamond at the park has remained in use the past two years, but Renfro-Michel said the town hopes to renovate the ballfield area in the future.

Pepe's chemical history

Pepe Field, named after the Boonton family that donated the land, was closed to residents and Little League teams in the late 1970s when the foul smell coming from the site was found to be from high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide gas and methane.

The emissions were later traced to degrading vegetable oils, margarine residues, soaps, coal ash and trash dumped there decades earlier by Drew Chemical Corp., a major local employer at the time.

The federal Environmental Protection Agency designated the property a Superfund site in 1983. A $15 million remediation was completed, and the park reopened in 2000 after extensive delays that included financing issues after the EPA determined that Drew could not be held liable for cleanup costs.

The shuttered Drew plant sat abandoned for about two decades before the property was sold and remediated in 2000. A Walmart store opened on the site in 2004.

New Jersey has the most Superfund sites of any state, 114 as of Feb. 1. Sites placed on the EPA list are contaminated with hazardous substances that threaten public health or the environment.

Morris County has 10 of those sites, more than the total in 12 states.

William Westhoven is a local reporter for DailyRecord.com. For unlimited access to the most important news from your local community, please subscribe or activate your digital account today.

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