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Latest News in Morris Plains, NJ

Art Show Explores 'A Sense of Place'

Morris Arts’ newest exhibit, "A Sense of Place," will showcase the artwork of eight New Jersey artists, with 186 works of art filling the walls of four floors of the Atrium Gallery in Morristown.The public is invited to the free opening reception on Feb. 2, from 7-9 p.m. The Atrium Gallery is located on floors 2-5 of the Morris County Administration and Records Building, 10 Court Street, Morristown.Curated by Lynn L. Siebert, Director of Galleries at Morris Arts, the show is described a...

Morris Arts’ newest exhibit, "A Sense of Place," will showcase the artwork of eight New Jersey artists, with 186 works of art filling the walls of four floors of the Atrium Gallery in Morristown.

The public is invited to the free opening reception on Feb. 2, from 7-9 p.m. The Atrium Gallery is located on floors 2-5 of the Morris County Administration and Records Building, 10 Court Street, Morristown.

Curated by Lynn L. Siebert, Director of Galleries at Morris Arts, the show is described as exploring the elemental human need for “a sense of place,” as global climate catastrophes, war and other dangers have displaced so many people throughout the world. Is "place" a real location, the evocation of a mood, a familiar landmark, a sight to see in a foreign country, the familiarity of one's own backyard, the shifting light in wooded wetlands or the gritty realism of urban streetscapes?

Each artist offers a unique definition of his/her "sense of place" and invites the viewers to contemplate their own interpretations. The artists are: Laurie Harden of Boonton, Todd Doney of Gillette, David Clair of Bernardsville, Kevin Burkitt of Neptune City, Mark de Mos of Morristown, Allan Gorman of West Orange, Lisa Lackey of Maplewood, and Marge Miccio of Trenton.

In the fifth floor atrium, Laurie Harden’s oils offer a veritable travelogue – from western plains to to Guatemala - capturing local flavors and moods with careful attention to animating details: the falling snow, a quiet task, a journey home or the splash of colors and patterns in marketplaces or at the rising dawn.

In the fifth floor elevator lobby, Todd Doney’s luminous, impressionistic oils transport viewers to mysterious places of woods and water. The play of light, the fleeting moment, the stillness of snow, the filtering of shadows on water or trees - all create unique “places” amidst the timelessness and beauty of Nature.

On the fourth floor atrium area, David Clair’s acrylics and mixed media works take the viewer to real and fictional locations, from castles and iconic houses to imagined spaces. Inventively combining paper and paint, Clair creates dramatic, scenic vistas and, in some works, depicts critical themes: disappearing beaches and forests, melting icecaps, extreme storms – all seen through intricate geometric prisms.

In the adjacent fourth floor hallway, Kevin Burkitt’s stark black and white photography revisits, in graphic detail, the devastating impact of Superstorm Sandy on its 10th anniversary. Photographed at night, these dramatic images reveal a destroyed “sense of place”: broken buildings filled with storm debris, skeletal structures with missing windows, collapsed walls and absent roofs. Powerfully evocative, these photos remind us that any sense of place is vulnerable to the destructive forces of Nature.

By contrast, in the third floor’s atrium area, Mark de Mos conveys a gentler “sense of place” using watercolors, oils and pastels to depict cozy interiors, lovely gardens, peaceful winter farmscapes, active cityscapes, serene parks and landmarks of our own Morristown area. His subtle use of color, line and nuanced composition invite the viewer into these places, conveyed with warmth, sensitivity and clear affection.

Filling the adjacent third floor hallway, Marge Miccio shares her sense of place with imaginative renderings of scenes from New Jersey to Maine. Each painting focuses on a very specific place - a building, a section of coastline, a pier, a streetscape – to the exclusion of other distracting sights. Whether in bright daylight or utilizing distinctive night settings (lit by streetlamps), Miccio’s scenes draw in the viewer and encourage contemplation of the mood and flavor of each scene.

In the second floor atrium, the viewer experiences the extraordinary, tangible textures of Allan Gorman’s urban scenes. With exacting precision, his oils convey the gritty feel of rusting steel girders, the glossy distortions of layered glass reflections, and the geometrically exacting play of planes/angles/shadows among steel, brick and glass structures of his streetscapes. Gorman defines his spaces with brutal directness, graphic precision and startling accuracy. A master of line, draftsmanship, light and shadow, he captures the fascinating interplay of patterns, differentiating the many textures of urban spaces through his uncanny and superb photorealistic oils.

And, in the adjacent, second floor hallway, Lisa Lackey offers her unique fabric and paper collages that memorialize glimpses of time and the hidden delights of ordinary places. Approaching her subjects from unusual angles, her works reveal the beauties found in daily life: the shadows cast by a white picket fence, the webbing on a patio chair, the colors and shapes forming patterns on a grocery aisle, the lines on a highway at night. In a sense, she is teaching the viewer to see anew – and to appreciate the unique places that surround us all.

Most of the artwork in "A Sense of Place" is available for sale. Catalogues are available at the show and online at www.morrisarts.org. The Atrium Art Gallery is free and open to the public during business hours, 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. The exhibit remains in place until March 14.

Now celebrating its 50th Anniversary, Morris Arts is a not-for-profit organization founded in 1973 dedicated to building community through the arts. Using the arts to inspire, connect and engage, Morris Arts serves as a resource for Morris County with a special focus on arts programming in the community and in the schools, arts advocacy, and support of the Morris Area community of artists and arts organizations.

L-R: Laurie Harden’s oil, Tending the Cattle; Todd Doney’s oil on linen, Trees, March 2, 5:25pm; David Clair’s mixed media, A Dying Breed; Kevin Burkitt’s photo, #1 from 91 Days, Countless Nights series

L-R: Mark de Mos’ oil, Crossing South Street; Marge Miccio’s oil, Anthony’s; Allan Gorman’s oil, The Shops at Hudson Yards; Lisa Lackey’s cording, thread and fabric on canvas, It’s Complicated

Morris County Government Reorganizes for 2023

John Krickus of Washington Township Seated as New Commissioner DirectorMorris County Commissioner John Krickus was sworn in tonight as the 2023 Director of the Board of County Commissioners after fellow board members Douglas Cabana, Thomas Mastrangelo and Christine Myers were sworn in to new, three-year terms and Morris County Sheriff James Gannon was sworn into another term.Commissioner Krickus was sworn in as Director of the Board ...

John Krickus of Washington Township Seated as New Commissioner Director

Morris County Commissioner John Krickus was sworn in tonight as the 2023 Director of the Board of County Commissioners after fellow board members Douglas Cabana, Thomas Mastrangelo and Christine Myers were sworn in to new, three-year terms and Morris County Sheriff James Gannon was sworn into another term.

Commissioner Krickus was sworn in as Director of the Board by state Sen. Steven Oroho as the Commissioner’s wife, Carolyn, held the bible.

“Morris County is the best run county in New Jersey, by far,” said Director Krickus, noting multiple accomplishments achieved by the county. “Some of the safest towns in New Jersey; county property taxes are among the lowest in the state, and our Vocational School and County College are nationally recognized. Morris residents enjoy our leading park system, open space, farmland and historic preservation. Is this heaven? No, it’s Morris County.”

Commissioner Myers, who had previously served on the board from 2016 to 2018, was sworn into her new term in office by Morris County Counsel John Napolitano, as her husband, Stan, held the bible. She was sworn in as Deputy Director of the Board by her nephew, attorney Robert Ferguson III.

The meeting opened with the swearing in of Commissioner Cabana, the longest serving member on the board, now beginning his tenth term. Sen. Anthony Bucco officiated as the bible was held by Amy Bucco, the Commissioner’s sister and the senator’s wife.

Commissioner Mastrangelo was sworn in by his daughter, Passaic County Assistant Prosecutor Brittney Mastrangelo, as the Commissioner’s wife, Debbie, held the bible.

Sheriff Gannon was sworn in by Morris/Sussex Superior Court Assignment Judge Stuart Minkowitz. The bible was held by the Sheriff’s daughter, Kate, along with his son-in-law, Matt, his grandchildren, Luca and Ella, and his girlfriend, Lisa.

The annual Morris County Reorganization Meeting was held in person in the Commissioners’ 5th Floor Public Meeting Room at the Morris County Administration & Records Building with full public attendance. It was the first time since 2020 and the onset of the pandemic that the reorganization meeting was not predominantly virtual.

Returning for the event was the Morris County Sheriff's Office Joint Honor Guard, with Robert McNally, Deputy Chief of Investigations of the Morris County Prosecutor’s Office, playing the bagpipes. They were joined by a crowd of well-wishers, family, friends and public officials packing into the meeting room.

The National Anthem was sung by Ella Conroy and Victoria Cooney who are 10th grade students at the Morris County Vocational School. Ella is in the academy for design and Victoria is in the Academy for Biotechnology.

Invocations were provided by Monsignor John Hart of The Assumption Parish in Morristown and a benediction was

provided by Father Stepan Bilyk of Saint John the Baptist Ukrainian Catholic Church in Whippany.

The Morris County Board of County Commissioners will hold their next work session and regular meeting on Jan. 11, 2022. The work session begins 4:30 p.m. and the regular meeting at 7 p.m. The meetings will continue to be held in public in the Administration & Records Building.

Photos:

Top Right: Morris County Sheriff's Office Joint Honor Guard, with Robert McNally, Deputy Chief of Investigations of the Morris County Prosecutor’s Office, playing the bagpipes.

Top Left: Director Krickus and his wife as he was sworn in.

Top Right: Deputy Director Myers thanks her colleagues after being sworn in.

Center Left: Commissioner Cabana is sworn in by Sen. Bucco.

Bottom Right: Commissioner Mastrangelo is sworn in by his daughter.

Bottom Left: Sheriff Gannon is sworn in with his family by his side.

Bottom: The National Anthem was sung by Ella Conroy and Victoria Cooney who are 10th grade students at the Morris County Vocational School.

Child Care Costs Eat Up More Of Morris County Parents' Income

A new report calls prices "untenable for families," even for those who live in areas where rates are lower.MORRIS COUNTY, NJ — Parents in Morris County with young children are spending about 11.3 percent of their income on child care, according to a new report that calls prices “untenable for families,” even for those who live in areas where rates are lower.That’s about $17,143 a year in 2022 dollars, according to the ...

A new report calls prices "untenable for families," even for those who live in areas where rates are lower.

MORRIS COUNTY, NJ — Parents in Morris County with young children are spending about 11.3 percent of their income on child care, according to a new report that calls prices “untenable for families,” even for those who live in areas where rates are lower.

That’s about $17,143 a year in 2022 dollars, according to the National Database of Childcare Prices, which offers the most comprehensive look yet at how child care costs vary across 2,360 counties in 47 states. The report was released earlier this week by the Women’s Bureau of the Department of Labor.

The report uses the latest data on child care costs from 2018, adjusted for inflation to 2022 dollars.

It shows that nationally, child care prices ranged from $4,810 ($5,357 in 2022 dollars) for school-age home-based care in small counties to $15,417 ($17,171 in 2022 dollars) for infant center-based care in very large counties.

The cost of child care represents between 8-19.3 percent of the median family income per child, according to the report.

Also:

The burden is even higher for families with multiple children in before- and after-school care or center-based child care. The analysis showed 29 percent of families with children under 6 have two or more in that age-group.

High child care costs are keeping some families — especially women — out of the labor market, the Women’s Bureau report noted.

In Morris County, women make up 77.3 percent of the labor market and have median earnings of $41,558 a year. The annual median family income is $135,938 a year. Also, 2.8 percent of families live below the poverty line.

The analysis found that even a 10 percent increase in child care costs causes a 1 percentage point decrease in moms in the workforce. A 50 percent increase dropped the number of employed mothers by 2 percentage points, and in counties where child care costs more than doubled, maternal employment dropped 4 percentage points.

On average, counties with higher wages for women did have a higher number of working moms, the report said, but the higher pay didn’t fully compensate for a reduction in maternal employment associated with higher child care costs.

The Women’s Bureau report said the current funding system — relying primarily on overburdened families and underpaid child care workers, who earn a median of $13.22 an hour and are twice as likely as workers in other sectors to live below the poverty line — contributes to substantial employee turnover that leads to an inadequate supply of affordable child care.

The report said asking providers, who spend between 60 percent and 80 percent of their operating budgets on wages, is unfeasible. Yet families can’t pay more, either, “meaning the childcare sector needs substantial government investment to function adequately and eventually prosper,” the report said.

Compared with other high-wage countries, the U.S. government spends little on early child care and education, ranking 35th among Organisation for Economic Co-opertion and Development, or OECD, nations for spending on early care and education of children ages 0-5 — less than $500 per child.

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Boys Basketball: LIVE updates, results & coverage for Friday, Jan. 27

FRIDAY, FEB. 27FEATURED GAMESNo. 1 Roselle Catholic vs. No. 7 Bergen Catholic, 7:30Nottingham vs. Ewing, 6:30COUNTY TOURNAMENT SCOREBOARDTOP 20 SCOREBOARDSTATEWIDE SCHEDULEFriday, Jan. 27ATLANTICPleasantville at Buena, 5:30pmEgg Harbor at St. Augustine, 6pmBridgeton vs. Absegami at Absegami High School, 7pmVineland at Atlantic Tech, 7pmMainland at Oakcrest, 7pmAtlantic City at Cedar ...

FRIDAY, FEB. 27

FEATURED GAMES

No. 1 Roselle Catholic vs. No. 7 Bergen Catholic, 7:30

Nottingham vs. Ewing, 6:30

COUNTY TOURNAMENT SCOREBOARD

TOP 20 SCOREBOARD

STATEWIDE SCHEDULE

Friday, Jan. 27

ATLANTIC

Pleasantville at Buena, 5:30pm

Egg Harbor at St. Augustine, 6pm

Bridgeton vs. Absegami at Absegami High School, 7pm

Vineland at Atlantic Tech, 7pm

Mainland at Oakcrest, 7pm

Atlantic City at Cedar Creek, 7pm

BERGEN

Saddle Brook at New Milford, 7pm

Park Ridge at Tenafly, 7pm

Cliffside Park at North Arlington, 7pm

BURLINGTON

Doane Academy at Holy Cross Prep, 4pm

Burlington Township at Westampton Tech, 5:15pm

Bordentown at Pemberton, 5:15pm

Cherry Hill West vs. Moorestown at Moorestown High School, 5:15pm

Medford Tech at Northern Burlington, 5:15pm

Riverside at Florence, 5:15pm

Friends Select (PA) at Moorestown Friends, 5:30pm

Pitman at Seneca, 6pm

Cinnaminson at Delran, 6:30pm

CAMDEN

Willingboro at Pennsauken, 5:15pm

Salem Tech at Gloucester Catholic, 5:30pm

CAPE MAY

Camden Academy Charter at Wildwood, 5:30pm

Lower Cape May at Cape May Tech, 5:30pm

St. Joseph (Hamm.) at Wildwood Catholic, 6pm

Middle Township at Ocean City, 6pm

CUMBERLAND

Hammonton at Millville, 3:45pm

ESSEX

Glen Ridge at Orange, 5:30pm

GLOUCESTER

Gloucester at Gloucester Tech, 5:15pm

Schalick at Gateway, 5:30pm

Pennsville at Clayton, 5:30pm

MERCER

Maple Shade at STEMCivics, 5:15pm

Solebury (PA) at Pennington, 5:30pm

Nottingham at Ewing, 6:30pm

Robbinsville at Hopewell Valley, 7pm

Hightstown vs. Trenton at Trenton Central High School Main Gym, 7pm

Princeton at West Windsor-Plainsboro South, 7pm

Steinert at West Windsor-Plainsboro North, 7pm

Hamilton West at Notre Dame, 7:45pm

MIDDLESEX

South River at Middlesex, 5:30pm

Calvary Christian (Old Bridge) at Dunellen, 5:30pm

Bridgewater-Raritan at Iselin Kennedy, 5:30pm

Metuchen at Wardlaw-Hartridge, 5:30pm

Perth Amboy Magnet at East Brunswick Magnet, 5:30pm

Highland Park at Piscataway Magnet, 5:30pm

Spotswood vs. Timothy Christian at Timothy Christian School, 7pm

MONMOUTH

Central Jersey College Charter at Academy Charter, 5pm

Lakewood at Ocean Township, 5:30pm

Keyport at Henry Hudson, 5:30pm

Lawrence at Allentown, 6:15pm

MORRIS

Morristown-Beard at Morris Knolls, 4pm

Dover at Morristown, 6pm

Paterson Arts at Mendham, 7pm

Delbarton at Jefferson, 7pm

Whippany Park at Madison, 7pm

Mount Olive at Roxbury, 7pm

OCEAN

Keansburg vs. Point Pleasant Beach at Point Beach, 5:30pm

Southern at Jackson Memorial, 5:45pm

Toms River South vs. Brick Memorial at Brick Memorial High School, 6:30pm

Barnegat at Manchester Township, 6:30pm

Brick Township at Pinelands, 6:30pm

Jackson Liberty at Donovan Catholic, 6:30pm

Toms River North at Toms River East, 6:30pm

Lacey at Central Regional, 7pm

SOMERSET

Paterson Eastside at Gill St. Bernard's, TBA

Princeton Day at Pingry, 4:15pm

SUSSEX

Warren Tech at Hopatcong, 7pm

UNION

Pioneer Academy at Koinonia, 6:30pm

Bergen Catholic at Roselle Catholic, 7pm

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5 Morris County Restaurants We Were Sad To See Go In 2022

Morris County lost a number of excellent eateries last year. Here are the spots we had to say goodbye to in 2022: MORRIS COUNTY, NJ — It's been a long year. Sadly, we lost a number of excellent, long-running restaurants in Morris County throughout 2022.Staples of many communities shut down for a variety of reasons, including retirement, inflation, or simply wanting something different.Here are five fantastic eateries that we sadly had to part ways with in the past year.Little Food Inn restaurant:...

Morris County lost a number of excellent eateries last year. Here are the spots we had to say goodbye to in 2022:

MORRIS COUNTY, NJ — It's been a long year. Sadly, we lost a number of excellent, long-running restaurants in Morris County throughout 2022.

Staples of many communities shut down for a variety of reasons, including retirement, inflation, or simply wanting something different.

Here are five fantastic eateries that we sadly had to part ways with in the past year.

Little Food Inn restaurant:

The Little Food Inn restaurant, which is located on the Newark Pompton Turnpike in Pompton Plains, served comfort food favorites such as chicken soup, sandwiches and meatloaf, among dozens of other popular options.

After operating for more than ten years, the restaurant closed, with the owners citing changes in the industry as the cause.

The Sparta Classic Diner:

The Sparta Classic Diner, located at 80 Woodport Road, in Sparta, caught on fire earlier this year, damaging the restaurant. The fire severely damaged areas of the restaurant, forcing it to "temporarily close" in July, but the diner has yet to reopen.

“Due to [the] fire, our restaurant will remain closed temporarily. Please visit back soon for updates,” the diner’s website still reads.

A potential reopening date has not been made public, and the company's final social media post was made shortly after the fire stating that the eatery will remain closed temporarily.

Bareburger:

The restaurant chain, Bareburger, which specializes in organic burgers and has plenty of vegan options, closed down its Morristown location only a few years after opening.

Bareburger opened its first and only in Morris County eatery in November 2019 at 11 South Street. It wasn't immediately made publicly clear why the Morristown restaurant closed. Patch sent a press inquiry to Bareburger but was given no response.

The since-closed eatery has been replaced by the brand-new pizzeria Coniglio's Old Fashioned.

Mara’s Café & Bakery

Mara’s Café & Bakery recently sold its final desserts at the Denville location. The longtime eatery closed permanently this year after nearly twenty years in business.

The bakery was originally set to close down in 2018 following some financial hardships. But ownership shifted to Allison Kohler, who revitalized Mara's. However, the business announced plans in July to close.

Howard Johnson's Restaurants

The Parsippany-headquartered Howard Johnson closed its final restaurant in the nation, shutting the doors of the Lake George, New York, establishment.

The historic business, which became the nation's largest restaurant chain in the 1960s and 70s, with more than 1,000 restaurants stopped operation over the last few years.

Howard Johnson was known for their iconic and classic 28 flavors.

You know what they say: great loss brings great opportunity, and a slew of new restaurants are joining the Morristown community. Check out Patch's list of new businesses that will open in 2023.

Are there any other businesses you were sad to see leave the neighborhood in 2022? Let Patch know!

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