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Latest News in Long Hill Township, NJ

N.J. monkeypox cases nearly double to 89 in a week

Monkeypox cases have nearly doubled in New Jersey in the last week from 45 to 89, according to the latest state Department of Health report.The majority of those cases were in the northern part of the state, a spokeswoman said, but a county-by-county breakdown was not available.“Beyond the numbers of cases, no additional details will be released due to patient confidentiality,” said Nancy Kearney, a Department of Health...

Monkeypox cases have nearly doubled in New Jersey in the last week from 45 to 89, according to the latest state Department of Health report.

The majority of those cases were in the northern part of the state, a spokeswoman said, but a county-by-county breakdown was not available.

“Beyond the numbers of cases, no additional details will be released due to patient confidentiality,” said Nancy Kearney, a Department of Health spokeswoman.

New Jersey has the 11th highest number of cases nationwide as of July 25, according to Center for Disease Control and Prevention data. New York has the most monkeypox cases with 990, while California has the second highest with 356 cases. The CDC data, which can lag slightly behind numbers reported at the state level, has New Jersey with 81 cases.

Nationwide, there have been 3,487 cases reported to the CDC. The World Health Organization recently declared monkeypox a global emergency.

Alaska, Maine, Montana, Vermont and Wyoming are the only states that have not yet recorded a case, according to the CDC.

Although cases have doubled in New Jersey in the past week, it’s still a relatively small number overall, said Stephanie Silvera, an epidemiologist and professor at Montclair State University.

“We need to have a reasonable level of concern,” Silvera said when asked about how worried the average resident should be.

Most of the population has no immunity to monkeypox and no prior exposure, she said. But a vaccine exists and the disease is not a complete unknown to the medical community, unlike COVID-19 was when it emerged, she said.

Some populations should be more concerned than others. Monkeypox is primarily spread through close physical contact, so people who regularly find themselves in high-touch situations will have a higher chance of contracting the virus.

“You go to a nightclub, you’re standing right next to somebody — you’re in a crowded space where there’s physical contact, that can be enough (for spread),” she said.

Vaccines are currently available to anyone who believes they are “at high risk of having been exposed to the virus in the past 14 days,” the state Department of Health said in a press release last week. Post-exposure prophylaxis, taken in two pills, is available for anyone with known exposure to the virus.

Because monkeypox is spread through close physical, contact, sex is an easy way for the virus to spread, but Silvera stressed that monkeypox is not a sexually transmitted infection.

Monkeypox is not unique to men who have sex with men, Silvera said. Cases are higher in that population currently because that’s where the disease first took hold, but it could have begun in any group of people, she said.

Places like daycare centers, where viruses “run rampant through young children because they’re in close physical contact, and they don’t keep their hands for themselves,” are also prime spreading grounds, Silvera said.

Unlike COVID-19, monkeypox is not an aerosolized virus, meaning it can’t linger in the air or spread from one side of the room to the other, Silvera said. It is carried on large respiratory droplets, meaning it could spread if you’re standing closely to someone.

Also unlike COVID-19, it can spread through fomites, which are particles of the virus that can live on surfaces, Silvera said.

“If you have somebody who is exhibiting symptoms, particularly lesions and open sores, you don’t want to share items with them,” Silvera said. “So you are going to want to be a little bit more careful.”

Monkeypox prevention tactics will sound very familiar to residents by now: wash your hands, avoid very crowded spaces, and don’t come into close contact with those who are sick.

Knowing the warning signs of monkeypox can also help prevent the spread. A pimple or blister-like rash is one of the hallmark symptoms, but fever, headaches, aches and exhaustion are also symptoms of the disease, the CDC says.

Anyone experiencing those symptoms should call their primary healthcare provider to ask about testing, the CDC says.

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New Jersey American Water Completes Acquisition of Bound Brook Sewer System

CAMDEN, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--New Jersey American Water today completed its acquisition of the wastewater collection system of the Borough of Bound Brook, N.J. for $5 million. This municipally owned...

CAMDEN, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--New Jersey American Water today completed its acquisition of the wastewater collection system of the Borough of Bound Brook, N.J. for $5 million. This municipally owned system serves approximately 2,900 customers, most of whom already receive water service from New Jersey American Water. On July 13, 2022, the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities approved the municipal consent allowing New Jersey American Water to provide sewer service to the Bound Brook customers as of the closing of the transaction.

“The sale proceeds will enable us to pay down the Borough’s municipal debt and stabilize, and even potentially reduce, property taxes for our residents.”

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“As Bound Brook’s trusted water provider for over a hundred years, we are happy and honored to now also be their sewer service provider. We are ready to start making the needed improvements to provide the community with sewer service that is as safe, reliable and affordable as the water service we provide,” said Mark McDonough, president of New Jersey American Water.

The agreement to purchase the sewer system was approved by nearly two-thirds of Bound Brook voters in a referendum held in November 2021. As part of the acquisition agreement, New Jersey American Water committed to invest more than $11 million in critical sewer system improvements in the next ten years.

“Selling the sewer system to New Jersey American Water was the best solution for our town,” said Bob Fazen, Mayor, Bound Brook Borough. “The sale proceeds will enable us to pay down the Borough’s municipal debt and stabilize, and even potentially reduce, property taxes for our residents.”

“In addition to the financial benefits for the borough, transferring the ownership of the Bound Brook sewer system gives our Department of Public Works staff the ability to focus on road and public area improvements and other essential projects while not having to manage the daily demands of sewer maintenance and emergency repairs,” added Bound Brook Council President Abel Gomez.

Residents will receive additional information in the mail from New Jersey American Water in the coming weeks. A new webpage, Bound Brook Wastewater, has also been created on the company’s website at www.newjerseyamwater.com, under Customer Service and Billing.

This is New Jersey American Water’s third wastewater acquisition within the company’s water footprint in the last four years, adding a total of more than 7,500 new wastewater customers. The company acquired the 1,800 customer Mount Ephraim wastewater system in 2019 and the 2,900 customer Long Hill Township wastewater system in 2020.

About New Jersey American Water New Jersey American Water, a subsidiary of American Water (NYSE: AWK), is the largest investor-owned water utility in the state, providing high-quality and reliable water and/or wastewater services to approximately 2.8 million people. For more information, visit www.newjerseyamwater.com and follow New Jersey American Water on Twitter and Facebook.

About American Water With a history dating back to 1886, American Water is the largest and most geographically diverse U.S. publicly traded water and wastewater utility company. The company employs more than 6,400 dedicated professionals who provide regulated and regulated-like drinking water and wastewater services to more than 14 million people in 24 states. American Water provides safe, clean, affordable and reliable water services to our customers to help keep their lives flowing. For more information, visit amwater.com and diversityataw.com. Follow American Water on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

Raising Cane's Chicken Fingers coming to these 3 South Jersey towns

Winner, winner, chicken fingers for lunch and dinner.Raising Cane’s Chicken Fingers, a Louisiana-based fast-food chain restaurant specializing in chicken fingers, is adding three South Jersey locations, including Cherry Hill, Burlington Township and Marlton.The Cherry Hill location will be on Route 70 and Haddonfield Road at Garden State Park, while the Marlton location will be at Route 70 near North Cr...

Winner, winner, chicken fingers for lunch and dinner.

Raising Cane’s Chicken Fingers, a Louisiana-based fast-food chain restaurant specializing in chicken fingers, is adding three South Jersey locations, including Cherry Hill, Burlington Township and Marlton.

The Cherry Hill location will be on Route 70 and Haddonfield Road at Garden State Park, while the Marlton location will be at Route 70 near North Cropwell Road, and the Burlington Township location will be at Mount Holly Road (Route 541) and Bromley Boulevard, the company said.

“We are so excited to bring our One Love – crave-able chicken finger meals – to the South Jersey area,” a Raising Cane’s spokesperson said in an email response. “We’ve seen so much enthusiasm for Cane’s in South Jersey already, and we can’t wait to officially become a part of the community!”

Raising Cane’s has two locations in Philadelphia and one set to open in Fairless Hills, Pennsylvania, in Bucks County, in September.

The chain was founded in 1996 by Todd Graves (and named for his yellow Labrador) and began with one store and has grown to more than 600, including locations in Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates and more.

The Burlington Township restaurant will be located at The Crossings, at the former Burlington Center Mall, which closed in 2018 and was demolished in 2021. A Maryland firm plans to build three warehouses at the old mall site with a combined 1.9 million square feet. That proposal calls for more than 100,000 square feet of retail development, including shops, restaurants and medical offices in seven buildings.

“The retail development at the former Burlington Center Mall has been a long time coming and we are absolutely thrilled that Raising Cane's eatery will be one of the first retailers at the new Crossings,” Burlington Township Mayor Pete Green said in an email statement.

The Marlton location is 800 Route 70 West. It is currently a vacant building. The location is near a Republic Bank, an AT&T store, a McDonald's and other businesses.

While Raising Cane’s is all about chicken fingers, the menu also offers a “sandwich combo” consisting of three chicken fingers on a toasted bun, Cane’s sauce, crinkle-cut fries and a fountain drink. Their box combo offers four chicken fingers, crinkle-cut fries, Cane’s sauce, Texas Toast, coleslaw and a regular drink. Cane’s sauce is described as “tangy with a little bit of spice and full of flavor.”

The restaurant features 100% premium white meat chicken tenderloins that are marinated, hand-battered and cooked to order, the website states. Raising Cane’s offers fresh-squeezed lemonade and freshly brewed sweet tea.

“Our concept is simple and unique … we only have ONE LOVE – quality chicken finger meals,” the Raising Cane’s website states. “At Raising Cane’s you get an exceptionally high-quality product served quickly and conveniently. We can do this because we offer a limited menu.”

Celeste E. Whittaker is a features reporter for the Courier Post, Daily Journal and Burlington County Times. The South Jersey native started at the CP in 1998 and has covered the Philadelphia 76ers, college and high school sports and has won numerous awards for her work. Reach her by email at [email protected]. Follow her on Twitter at @cp_CWhittaker.

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Top 10 NJ Arts Events of Week: ‘The Lost Princess of Oz,’ UB40 and The Original Wailers, more

Here is a roundup of arts events taking place around the state, through Aug. 25.DANCE• Axelrod Contemporary Ballet Theater presents a new multimedia dance musical, “The Lost Princess of Oz” — based on the 1917 novel of the same name, from L. Frank Baum’s “Oz series” — Aug. 19-21 and 26-28 at the Pollak Theatre at Monmouth University in Long Branch. The lib...

Here is a roundup of arts events taking place around the state, through Aug. 25.

DANCE

Axelrod Contemporary Ballet Theater presents a new multimedia dance musical, “The Lost Princess of Oz” — based on the 1917 novel of the same name, from L. Frank Baum’s “Oz series” — Aug. 19-21 and 26-28 at the Pollak Theatre at Monmouth University in Long Branch. The libretto is by Shannon Hill, with an Appalachian-flavored score by Chris Becker, and AXCBT founder and director Gabriel Chajnik serves as choreographer. Reagan Richards and Gordon Brown of the country-rock duo Williams Honor will appear, respectively, as the story’s talking hen and as Baum, whose “Oz” series previously served as the basis for both the classic movie “The Wizard of Oz” and the hit musical “Wicked.”

MUSIC

After skipping two years because of the pandemic, the Freehold-based Surf, Lounge and Exotic Sounds label Hi-Tide will resume its annual Summer Holiday: Asbury Park festival, Aug. 19-21 at Asbury Lanes and The Asbury hotel, with bands including Los Straitjackets, Southern Culture on the Skids, Messer Chups, Man or Astro-Man?, Black Flamingos, Televisionaries, Slowey & The Boats, The Swingin’ Palms, Charlie Halloran & The Tropicales and others.

• The Playbillies will play bluegrass versions of Broadway songs, Aug. 24-27 at 7 p.m. at the Brookside Cabaret at the Carriage House restaurant at the Paper Mill Playhouse in Millburn. The band features Mike Rosengarten on banjo, Matt Cusack on bass, Armando Gutierrez on guitar and Erica Swindell on fiddle. (See a video below of them performing George and Ira Gershwin’s “Bidin’ My Time,” from “Girl Crazy.”)

Four reggae acts — UB40, The Original Wailers, Maxi Priest and Big Mountain — will perform at Prudential Hall of the New Jersey Performing Arts Center in Newark, Aug. 21 at 7 p.m. The Original Wailers feature Al Anderson, originally from Montclair, a guitarist who played on classic albums by Bob Marley & the Wailers and Peter Tosh, and toured extensively with Marley. UB40 features singer Matt Doyle, who joined last year, but also four musicians who were original members of the group in 1978: guitarist Robin Campbell, bassist Earl Falconer, drummer Jimmy Brown and percussionist Norman Hassan.

In celebration of the 118th anniversary of the birth of Red Bank native Count Basie, Jazz Arts Project will present a free show titled “One O’Clock Jump” (after one of Basie’s signature songs) and featuring performances by the Radam Schwartz Organ Big Band, The Chuck Lambert Band and the Jazz Arts Academy All Stars, Aug. 21 at 1 p.m. at Red Bank’s Johnny Jazz Park.

As you might guess from its name, the band Foreigners Journey, which is fronted by “American Idol” alumnus and Tony nominee (for “Rock of Ages”) Constantine Maroulis, plays the hits of two classic-rock bands that had impressive strings of hits from the mid-’70s to the late-80s, Foreigner and Journey. The group will perform at the Axelrod Performing Arts Center in Deal, Aug. 18 at 8 p.m., as well as the URSB Carteret Performing Arts and Events Center, Sept. 24 at 8 p.m.

“Let It Be” — the musical, featuring Beatles songs, that ran on London’s West and Broadway in New York in 2012 and 2013, respectively — will have an extended run at Sound Waves at the Hard Rock Hotel and Casino in Atlantic City, Aug. 19-22 and 24-28.

FILM

The Clairidge in Montclair will screen the 1985 blockbuster “Back to the Future,” Aug. 20 at 6 p.m., after a question-and-answer session with three actors who appeared in the film: Claudia Wells (who played Jennifer Parker, the girlfriend of the film’s hero, Michael J. Fox’s Marty McFly), Harry Waters Jr. (who played bandleader Marvin Berry) and Donald Fullilove (who played Mayor Goldie Wilson). Also, the film’s DeLorean Time Machine will be on display outside the theater.

OTHER

The Canal Day Music and Craft Festival, taking place Aug. 20 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Hugh Force Canal Park in Wharton, will offer kayak and boat rides, a traveling zoo, arts and crafts displays, pony rides, fireworks and roots music on two stages, with artists including The Wag, Sonrise Mountain Revival, The Norton Smull Band, The Big Noise Brass Band, The Long Hill String Band, Loretta Hagen, Background Noise, The Pishy Cloots, and The Fabulous Rhythm Aces (featuring Son Lewis).

One of the standout players on the 1969 New York Mets’ World Series-winning team, Cleon Jones, has written a memoir, “Coming Home: My Amazing Life With the New York Mets,” and will sign it at Bookends in Ridgewood, Aug. 25 at 6 p.m.

REVIEWS

“Billie Holiday at Sugar Hill: Photographs by Jerry Dantzic” at Newark Museum of Art. (Through Aug. 21)

“The Hummingbirds” at New Jersey Repertory Company in Long Branch. (Through Aug. 28)

“Maxwell Mustardo: Dish-Oriented” at Hunterdon Art Museum, Clinton. (Through Sept. 4)

“Land of the Free” at MANA Contemporary, Jersey City. Works by Vincent Valdez, Hugo Crosthwaite and Joe Minter. (Through Sept. 17)

“For the Culture, by the Culture: Thirty Years of Black Art, Activism, and Achievement” at Morris Museum, Morris Township. (Through Sept. 25)

“New Jersey Arts Annual: Reemergence” at State Museum, Trenton. (Through April 30)

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From Wegmans to Warehouse. Washington Twp Property Considered for Large Warehouse Plus Affordable Housing

Twenty years after Wegmans purchased 30 acres of land in Washington Township (Gloucester County, NJ) for a supermarket which was never built, today plans are being considered to develop a 400,000 sq ft warehouse plus affordable housing on the same property.From Wegmans to Warehouse. We do not have details on a possible tenant. Many of these warehouses in South Jersey are being proposed without signed tenants.I am used “considered” in the title… but the word “propose...

Twenty years after Wegmans purchased 30 acres of land in Washington Township (Gloucester County, NJ) for a supermarket which was never built, today plans are being considered to develop a 400,000 sq ft warehouse plus affordable housing on the same property.

From Wegmans to Warehouse. We do not have details on a possible tenant. Many of these warehouses in South Jersey are being proposed without signed tenants.

I am used “considered” in the title… but the word “proposed” is used by the development team in a letter to the County for an initial sketch review.

That being said while they have not officially presented before the Planning Boards, the Developers have put in significant effort and investment into the project already.

Of course I’ll rundown all of the details I have, which are somewhat significant and very telling.

The warehouse developer does have a Pending Sale Agreement with Wegmans.

The developers have discussed the project informally with the Gloucester County Land Use Board as well as Washington Township officials.

They have submitted a preliminary “sketch” review to the County Land Use Board. I have those plans.

The earliest evidence I have of the planned project is the LLC formation documents of “300 Watson Drive Partners, LLC” on December 14, 2021.

And while I understand the project status could change any day, the most recent evidence of project activity is a dead restriction change between Lowe’s and Wegmans dated just 40 days ago on July 29, 2022.

Word of the project must be getting out as we chatted with 2 area business persons who own property or are moving into the immediate area of Watson Drive, and they both volunteered to me “Hey did you hear about the warehouse?”. One small business owner was looking to sign a lease in the area and the landlord used the warehouse plans as a selling feature related to the workers and trucks coming into the area.

This is another area warehouse project by Blackwood’s AP Construction, who are also looking to develop warehouses at Gloucester Township’s former Freeway Golf Course. We covered that story 3 weeks ago and for that other Gloucester Township project then are scheduled to appear at the September 14th Zoning Board meeting.

For AP Construction and the Washington Township Warehouse Project, on August 5th I emailed several principals of the company for comment, and they have not replied.

Wegmans Property – Washington Township

To further clarify the location, the 30 acres are situated behind the Lowe’s Home Improvement store on the Black Horse Pike in Washington Township NJ (Gloucester County).

If you aren’t aware over 20 years ago Wegmans Supermarkets wanted to build a store in Washington Township. It is one of the most talked about “not developed” stories in the 42 Freeway core region.

In articles that I’ve seen from the time, it appears they were looking to open in Washington Township before the Cherry Hill location opened!

So intent was Wegmans on opening in “Township” that they purchased 30 acres of land on Watson Drive behind the Lowe’s Home Improvement store for a whopping $4.6 million.

And then nothing. As Cherry Hill and Mt Laurel Wegmans locations opened, the Washington Township location never came to be.

Rumors fly as to why, but no solid information has been released.

I posted on this in 2020 stating the property was up for sale with a then asking price of $5 Million. (Back in 2018 I shared this YouTube commentary)

So while there is no supermarket on the property, it 100% is still owned by Wegmans.

So the property location is close to the Black Horse Pike but sits behind the large Lowe’s store and parking lot. That very large and dense wooded area.

The property follows along the long curved road of Watson Drive and connects with Fries Mill Road.

A small portion of the property is bordered by Fries Mill Road, and the remaining is bordered by businesses.

Warehouse and Affordable Housing Plans

As mentioned the first date I can put on official movement on this project is when a representative of AP Construction was approved on December 14, 2021 for the LLC business name of “300 Watson Drive Partners”. The address given is the AP Construction offices in Blackwood.

Creating a new LLC is a common practice in business development for accounting and tax purposes, to separate from the core business.

The name 300 Watson Drive partners carries through the documents we acquired.

Gloucester County Land Use Sketch Review

In June of 2022 the Gloucester County Land Development Review committee examined the “sketch” application for the proposed development. The committee gives approval on projects which will sit on County roads.

When formally submitted to the County its a somewhat intensive process in that the County wants all details presented, from accessing County Roads for driveways, to business type, number of employees and traffic load, and interior property site plans.

So every town and County will talk to developers in advance of the formal presentation. If you’ve sat in any Town Planning Board meeting it’s very clear the developer has been working with town planners and other entities for months in advance. Even the MUA and Fire departments get a look at the projects before the formal presentation,

In the case of the Gloucester County Land Development Review team, they offer a “sketch” review where developers can have an informal discussion with the County, and receive feedback.

While it isn’t the official final review, it is on an application marked as sketch. Professionally prepared documents are submitted and a formal response from the County is provided back.

So finally on to some details!

Warehouse Component

The proposal includes a large warehouse utilizing most of the 30 acre property, and a smaller section of 34 affordable housing units at the corner of Watson Drive and Fries Mill Road.

The warehouse considered for Washington Township is 406,560 sq feet. The dimensions are 330′ x 1232′ feet.

The warehouse is a long rectangle and positioned to maximize the space in the property. One end is at the Lowe’s side and the other would be closer to Fries Mill Road.

It appears the warehouse garage bays would be positioned facing Watson Drive.

There are buffer areas around the property due to the curvature of the road and the flat back side of the warehouse.. but the significant amount of that land is designated as Stormwater Manangement.

There are 4 entrances noted into the warehouse portion of the property, with one off of Fries Mill Road.

Based on site plan markings, the Fries Mill entrance leads to “Main Parking” which I assume to be for warehouse employees, and the three Watson Drive entrances would be for tractor trailer traffic.

All told they indicated on the plans 295 parking spaces, 70 loading spaces (bays) and 85 trailer parking spaces.

Proximity to Highways

The location for the proposed warehouse is in a commercial and residential area, but not exactly situated directly on a major highway.

Looking at Google maps there is 2.5 miles of heavily traveled Black Horse Pike to reach the highway portion of Route 42.

To access the AC Expressway at the closest exit (Cross Keys Rd) that is 2.65 miles and requires trucks to travel along both the heavily traveled Black Horse Pike AND Berlin Cross Keys Roads.

Affordable Housing Component

As mentioned the affordable housing will be positioned at the corner of Watson Drive and Fries Mill Road.

This would be directly across from the PNC Bank Buildng.

The housing is planned to be one building with 34 units.

I do not know the targeted “category” of the affordable housing units. Normally I would guess over-55 Senior Housing, but the plans do note a “Play Area” with a slide icon. This could simply just be a placeholder for a general small park area.

The plan indicates 66 parking spaces.

There will be two driveway entrances, one on Watson Drive and another on Fries Mill Rd.

Deed Restriction Change and Pending Sale Agreement

I mentioned that Wegmans purchased 30 acres of land behind Lowe’s Home Improvement.

What I didn’t clarify in this article yet is that Lowe’s initially owned the entire parcel including the Wegmans land.

Wegmans purchased the property from Lowe’s.

But back in 2002 when the land was sold to Wegmans, Lowe’s wanted to make sure that the land they sold would not be used in a manner that would later compete with the Lowe’s business model.

So the contract and property deed included usage restrictions for the 300 Watson Drive property.

Twenty years later, to be certain that the new proposed use of “Warehouse and Residential” was not impactful in deed for the project, a change to the “Restrictive Covenants and Restrictive Agreement” was completed and filed with the county.

That deed was filed on July 29, 2022. Just 41 days ago.

And in that document change clearly states.

WHERAS, 300 Watson Drive Partners, LLC (“300 Watson”) has entered into an agreement of sale with Wegmans to acquire the Wegmans Property, as may be amended or restated from time to time (the “Pending Sale Agreement”) for warehouse and residential development

300 Watson Drive Property Restrictive Covenant Amendment – Filed with Gloucester County July 29th

So again, this warehouse project has not been officially presented to the Planning/Zoning Boards of Washington Township…

Consider that there is a Pending Agreement of Sale to the warehouse developer.

And also this document was signed by Wegmans Director of Real Estate and a Lowe’s Vice President.

Even putting aside the attorney fees to work this out, I don’t think you put the time and effort into having two executives of companies with combined yearly sales of $110 billion… discuss, agree and sign a legal document related to the warehouse project…

… unless you were very certain you were going to move forward with it.

Approvals? Meetings?

So again there has been no formal presentation yet asking for approvals.

I am not clear on the zoning of the property, if it will support a warehouse as an allowed use.

But you know I’ll let you all know!

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