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At Denville Medical, we aim to serve you with long-lasting quality of life through personalized acupuncture treatments in New Jersey. The path to a pain-free life begins with a friendly, informative appointment, where one of our doctors develops a customized treatment plan tailored to your body's needs. It starts with your first evaluation, where our experts learn about your medical history, diagnostic tests, current condition, and overall health goals. From there, we'll create your plan and help you hit your milestones until your quality of life is improved.

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Latest News in Long Hill Township, NJ

Long Hill's Styrofoam recycling machine turns trash into treasure

LONG HILL TWP. – Tossing one Styrofoam coffee cup out the car window or into the wastebasket will take at least 500 years to decompose.As a result, about 30 percent of the world’s landfills are made up of Styrofoam. In U.S. landfills alone, approximately 1,369 tons of the material are buried there every day.The public narrative surrounding Styrofoam products has long been that they cannot be recycled and must be thrown in the trash. Foam Cycle is aiming to change that shared notion through its first...

LONG HILL TWP. – Tossing one Styrofoam coffee cup out the car window or into the wastebasket will take at least 500 years to decompose.

As a result, about 30 percent of the world’s landfills are made up of Styrofoam. In U.S. landfills alone, approximately 1,369 tons of the material are buried there every day.

The public narrative surrounding Styrofoam products has long been that they cannot be recycled and must be thrown in the trash. Foam Cycle is aiming to change that shared notion through its first foam packaging recycling system. It is designed to be placed at outdoor municipal recycling drop-off centers.

A Styrofoam recycling machine was funded in this year’s municipal budget under Department of Public Works (DPW) capital expenses. It was installed last week and DPW workers demonstrated the new Foam Cycle machine on Friday, Oct. 14.

Long Hill is the first municipality in Morris County to have the system and only the sixth in the state.

A heap of tarp bags stuffed with Styrofoam was stacked near DPW’s Foam Cycle machine to be recycled. DPW Director Al Gallo said the towering amount was collected in just a week.

Foam Cycle is designed to collect, recycle and repurpose foam packaging waste. Styrofoam is fed into the machine, where blades break it up into bits, then the bits are melted down by an internal hot plate. The condensed foam is then fed out of the machine – similar to an ice cream soft serve machine – into a 30-pound spiraled block.

When Styrofoam is processed through Foam Cycle, 98 percent of the air is released and 2 percent of the polystyrene plastic is extruded, resulting in a 90:1 densification.

This densified polystyrene foam isn’t the finished product, however. It has a very high resale value, and is used to make new products, such as picture frames, RV panels, cruise ship molding and home insulation.

Many of those finished products can then be recycled again, resulting in a closed-loop recycling system.

“It’s a local recycling system that actually provides for a circular economy,” said Foam Cycle company spokeswoman Renee Garrin. “It doesn’t have to go to other countries.”

Foam packaging, otherwise known as Styrofoam, is one of the most plentiful yet least recycled plastics in existence today.

“With packaging waste shifting from retailers to direct home delivery, foam packaging waste is too large to be placed in a curbside container and is not accepted by most single-stream recycling facilities,” a Foam Cycle flier reads.

Clean white styrofoam is the only foam packaging material accepted by Long Hill DPW. Egg cartons, dark color foam, non-washed food service foam, cardboard, foam glued to cardboard, dirty or wet foam, packing peanuts, and foam wrapped in plastic paper are not accepted.

Township Administrator Nancy Malool said at the Wednesday, Oct. 12 Township Committee meeting that Styrofoam collection bags have been placed at the DPW yard, located at 1223 Valley Road in Stirling, and another at Town Hall, near the library entrance.

“Residents actually already filled that one up once and it was already collected by DPW,” Malool said.

The densified polystyrene foam weighs 30 pounds a block. Each filled pallet weighs about 1,500 pounds, according to Gallo.

The Styrofoam is then sold to Princeton Mouldings, a New Brunswick company that recycles polystyrene into picture frame parts, for 25 cents per pound or $600 per ton. Long Hill DPW had previously brought its collected Styrofoam to the DPW in Springfield.

“We’re anticipating that the machine will actually pay for itself when we sell the compressed Styrofoam,” Malool said. “We’re anticipating it will pay for itself in less than three years.”

Malool said neighboring municipalities have already contacted the township to bring their Styrofoam over. “The more we get, the more we process, the more we sell, the faster we pay it off,” she said.

Garrin said she believed that Foam Cycle’s future growth and larger environmental impact will “occur when we make our recycling system known and available to municipal recycling drop-off centers throughout the country.”

Anthony Marrone, the Morris County Municipal Utilities Authority District Recycling Coordinator, presented an award to the township DPW for its “commitment to recycling, environment and citizens.”

Gallo said Marrone “helped us out big time” with the township’s recycling and curbside take-it-or-leave-it programs.

Garrin highlighted that Styrofoam is a highly used product, from coffee cups to foam coolers for hospitals and veterinary offices.

“We cannot do without it,” she said. “Let’s show how it can be better recycled.”

NJ township tears down partially built mansion after decade-long battle

CHERRY HILL, New Jersey (WPVI) -- A decade-long battle between a property owner and Cherry Hill Township may be coming to an end.The legal fight involves a massive 18,000-square-foot partially built mansion that was torn down Thursday morning.The Empire State building took a year to build. The Eiffel Tower took two years. And it took roughly seven years to build the Colosseum in Italy."My house will always be here. They're not going to tear down my property," Denise Williams told Action News in an exclusive int...

CHERRY HILL, New Jersey (WPVI) -- A decade-long battle between a property owner and Cherry Hill Township may be coming to an end.

The legal fight involves a massive 18,000-square-foot partially built mansion that was torn down Thursday morning.

The Empire State building took a year to build. The Eiffel Tower took two years. And it took roughly seven years to build the Colosseum in Italy.

"My house will always be here. They're not going to tear down my property," Denise Williams told Action News in an exclusive interview last week.

Her mega-mansion on Winding Drive in Cherry Hill has been under construction for nearly 14 years, and it still wasn't done. There were still no windows, no exterior finish and no basic components.

"It will be over my dead body before I allow the township to tear my property down," she said.

Construction came to a standstill about a decade ago. The 60-year-old blames the real estate market crash around 2010, troubles with contractors and harassment from neighbors and township officials for her construction woes.

"At every turn, the township, instead of working with me, have hindered my efforts," she said.

Cherry Hill Township Attorney William Cook disagrees.

"There has been no effort by Ms. Williams to present us with the necessary documentation that we need to approve further construction for this property," he said.

Cook said the building was unsafe and an eyesore in this wealthy enclave. He said after construction halted in 2012 and Williams' permit extensions expired at the end of 2015, she failed to submit proper architectural and engineering reports and new construction permit applications to meet new building codes.

"We have been more than fair to Ms. Williams in allowing her for well over 10 years to provide us with the necessary approvals for her to complete construction," he added.

Williams gave Action News her response.

"OK, what I say to that is that is just a regurgitation of lies," said Williams.

The battle has played out in the courts. The township said Williams' attempts to prevent demolition ultimately were denied.

And on Thursday, the township ripped down the home, demolishing what Williams says was an estimated million dollars in building costs.

Williams arrived on the scene in the middle of the demolition. She had 24-7 security on site, which did little to prevent the teardown.

The township told Action News the demolition cost $149,000 and it plans to put a lien on the property.

Williams told Action News that although they tore down her home they haven't torn down her resolve. She plans to sue to try and recover her building costs which are now just rubble.

Wrestling: Results, recaps, photos and links for Wednesday, Jan. 4

Morris Hills 37, Kittatinny 36Hopewell Valley 40, Lawrence 21No. 13 St. Joseph (Met.) 34, No. 16 South Plainfield 23Pascack Hills 38, River Dell 18Shawnee 48, Camden Catholic 22Haddonfield 54, Collingswood 12Seton Hall Prep 61, Livingston 7Wednesday, Jan. 4Middle Township 78, St. Joseph (Hamm.) 0 - Box ScoreWest Windsor-Plainsboro North 40, ...

Morris Hills 37, Kittatinny 36

Hopewell Valley 40, Lawrence 21

No. 13 St. Joseph (Met.) 34, No. 16 South Plainfield 23

Pascack Hills 38, River Dell 18

Shawnee 48, Camden Catholic 22

Haddonfield 54, Collingswood 12

Seton Hall Prep 61, Livingston 7

Wednesday, Jan. 4

Middle Township 78, St. Joseph (Hamm.) 0 - Box Score

West Windsor-Plainsboro North 40, Ewing 39 - Box Score

St. Thomas Aquinas 46, Woodbridge 18 - Box Score

North Plainfield 42, Highland Park 27 - Box Score

Iselin Kennedy 60, Metuchen 23 - Box Score

Sayreville 83, Perth Amboy 0 - Box Score

St. Joseph (Met.) 34, South Plainfield 23 - Box Score

Morris Hills 37, Kittatinny 36 - Box Score

Shawnee 48, Camden Catholic 22 - Box Score

Seton Hall Prep 61, Livingston 7 - Box Score

Shore 36, Point Pleasant Beach 28 - Box Score

Howell 44, Marlboro 33 - Box Score

Christian Brothers 53, Middletown North 23 - Box Score

Point Pleasant Boro 63, Pinelands 11 - Box Score

Middletown South 51, Freehold Township 16 - Box Score

Red Bank Regional 58, Matawan 15 - Box Score

Manalapan 61, Freehold Borough 13 - Box Score

Colts Neck 42, Ocean Township 28 - Box Score

Southern 51, Brick Memorial 19 - Box Score

Brick Township 42, Toms River East 35 - Box Score

Don Bosco Prep 39, Rumson-Fair Haven 36 - Box Score

Bernards 78, Rutgers Prep 6 - Box Score

North Hunterdon 59, Montgomery 15 - Box Score

Warren Hills 53, Ridge 10 - Box Score

Pingry 40, Bound Brook 30 - Box Score

Princeton 39, Franklin 34 - Box Score

Delaware Valley 64, Voorhees 15 - Box Score

Phillipsburg 56, Bridgewater-Raritan 12 - Box Score

Manville 64, Belvidere 6 - Box Score

Schalick 48, Cedar Creek 25 - Box Score

Kingsway 55, Clearview 10 - Box Score

Woodstown 54, Overbrook 24 - Box Score

Delsea 47, Washington Township 24 - Box Score

Rahway 72, Plainfield 7 - Box Score

Westfield 66, Linden 9 - Box Score

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Joe Zedalis covers Shore Conference and Greater Middlesex Conference wrestling for NJ.com. He can be reached at [email protected]. Follow him on Twitter @Josephzedalis

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Keeping secrets is bad | Opinion

Note: This is a copy of our weekly Wednesday a.m. Opinion newsletter, which points out the most popular editorials and op-eds of the past week. Click ...

Note: This is a copy of our weekly Wednesday a.m. Opinion newsletter, which points out the most popular editorials and op-eds of the past week. Click HERE to sign up and never miss a week!

The recent uproar over a backroom deal to rehire Newark Superintendent Roger León for five more years started a couple of weeks ago with some basic questions that our editorial board sent to him and district attorney Brenda Liss, who reports to León.

We are hearing that he may have won a contract renewal, but we’re unsure if this is accurate, we asked in an email on Jan. 9. “Hoping you can clarify.”

The query continued, If it was renewed, how did that happen? “Did the school board vote on it? If the superintendent’s contract was renewed, on what basis was this done? Was there a positive evaluation of his performance? If his contract was renewed, will there be any public announcement of this fact?”

All we got was silence.

A full week later, after we sent our questions to a few school board members, a woman who serves as the spokesperson for both the superintendent and the board finally sent us a three-sentence answer.

“Yes,” Nancy Deering wrote. “In accordance with its terms, the contract automatically renewed in May. While we do not usually comment on staff performance, of course there was a positive evaluation of his performance.” Then, the district refused to respond to any of our follow-up questions.

The difficulty of getting even that basic information only reinforces this point: The school board and superintendent are operating without transparency.

How can they rehire the schools chief without including parents and the public? You can’t cut community members out of such a major decision in a struggling district where only 13% of kids can do math on grade level.

That’s outrageous, we argued in our editorial last week, and at least one school board member seems to recognize that.

“I think we need to do right by the community and let them speak and let them have their say on what they think should be done,” Crystal Williams said at a tense public meeting on Saturday, after the public learned about this on NJ.com and The Star-Ledger.

She added, “You can’t go around and bypass the community.”

Thursday’s meeting is the board’s final chance to try and slam the brakes on this, we said in a follow-up editorial. Its members may not all have realized that a legally questionable clause in León’s contract says they were supposed to put him on notice back in May that his job isn’t renewed automatically.

That deadline passed, but the board didn’t notify the public, or even put the issue on its agenda. Whether that’s legally valid or not, it’s clear they should have informed the community, and given people a chance to weigh in.

They may not all have known then, but they do now. This is their final chance to fix it – and show the people of Newark that they aren’t going to operate in the dark.

Here are some other compelling issues we wrote about in this week’s Opinion section:

Bayonne’s Hesters: Poster family for Catholic schools | Faith Matters: All Saints Catholic Academy honored the Hester family “for their commitment to Catholic education.”

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The Absolute Best Authentic Irish Pubs in New Jersey

New Jersey is known for its heritage.While the Italian history in the Garden State is strong, so is the Irish history.With a name like Matt Ryan, it doesn't take a genius to figure out where my ancestors are from.Not too long ago I did one of those Ancestry DNA tests and they were able to narrow down an exact neighborhood in Ireland that had relatives of mine. It's just outside of Dublin.What makes a great Irish pub?First, it's got to be the drinks, right?The Guinness better be cold and plentiful....

New Jersey is known for its heritage.

While the Italian history in the Garden State is strong, so is the Irish history.

With a name like Matt Ryan, it doesn't take a genius to figure out where my ancestors are from.

Not too long ago I did one of those Ancestry DNA tests and they were able to narrow down an exact neighborhood in Ireland that had relatives of mine. It's just outside of Dublin.

What makes a great Irish pub?

First, it's got to be the drinks, right?

The Guinness better be cold and plentiful.

Next is the food.

You know, I've heard so many people call Irish cuisine "boring" or "bland."

It's not everybody's thing, but if done correctly, Irish food is delicious.

Corned beef and cabbage anyone?

Finally, in order for an Irish pub to be great, it must have an authentic atmosphere.

Whether it's a historic pub complete with the original bar, or personality hanging from the walls, a real Irish pub has to have, well, flare.

I couldn't list every single great Irish pub on this list because I'd be here forever.

Instead, I narrowed things down by using location, authenticity, and reviews.

Grab a drink and maybe a bowl of Irish stew, some soda bread, Shepherd's pie, or boiled bacon and cabbage, and check out the absolute best authentic Irish Pubs in the Garden State.

Did I miss your favorite spot? Please let me know about it by sending me a note at [email protected].

The Absolute Best Irish Pubs in New Jersey

St. Stephen's Green Publick House - 2031 Rt. 71 - Spring Lake Heights

If you don't know what you're looking for, you could drive right past St. Stephen's on Rt. 71.

St. Stephen's Green Publick House - 2031 Rt. 71 - Spring Lake Heights

The food and drink at St. Stephen's is phenomenal any time of day, but the brunch is next level.

Downtown Metuchen is such a cool place. Hailey's is right on Main Street and offers traditional Irish fare and entertainment.

Celtic Cottage - 608 2nd Ave. - Long Branch

Celtic Cottage - 608 2nd Ave. - Long Branch

McDonagh's Pub - 2 W. Front St. - Keyport

McDonagh's Pub - 2 W. Front St. - Keyport

Old Oar House - 123 N. High St. - Millville

Old Oar House - 123 N. High St. - Millville

Old Oar House is known for their Reuben balls. Interested? They consist of are house made corned beef brisket with sauerkraut and Swiss cheese that’s breaded, then deep fried and served with Russian dressing. Yes, please.

Shannon Rose - 96 Kingsland Rd. - Clifton

Irish Pub - 164 St. James Pl. - Atlantic City

Irish Pub - 164 St. James Pl. - Atlantic City

Many of the regulars are locals, but don't be surprised if you see celebs stop in for a beer. This is one of Kelsey Grammer's favorite spots.

Mulligan's Pub - 159 1st St. - Hoboken

Mulligan's Pub - 159 1st St. - Hoboken

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