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Latest News in Mendham Township, NJ

Limited Brewery License Applicant Takes Next Steps In Mendham

Mendham Township's Zoning Board of Adjustment voted in favor 5-2 on Tuesday, that Backer Farm's proposed farm brewery is a permitted use. MENDHAM, NJ — A local preserved farm that aims to transform its dairy barn into a farm-based, brewery, is a step closer in the process.Mendham Township’s Zoning Board of Adjustment voted 5-2 at its meeting on Tuesday in favor of Backer Farm. Several residents filed an interpretation request through their a...

Mendham Township's Zoning Board of Adjustment voted in favor 5-2 on Tuesday, that Backer Farm's proposed farm brewery is a permitted use.

MENDHAM, NJ — A local preserved farm that aims to transform its dairy barn into a farm-based, brewery, is a step closer in the process.

Mendham Township’s Zoning Board of Adjustment voted 5-2 at its meeting on Tuesday in favor of Backer Farm. Several residents filed an interpretation request through their attorney, asking the zoning board to determine if creating the brewery operation on the property — which currently has produce and livestock — would be a permitted use and within the guidelines of New Jersey’s Right to Farm Act.

“Our farm has evolved since our beginning almost a century ago,” said Fred Backer of the family-owned farm in a statement released Thursday. “Agriculture is a constantly changing industry. We continue to evolve as the market for our products and services changes over time. Our planned farm-based brewery is just another way we are meeting the demands and addressing the current market trends in agriculture.”

The next step for Backer Farm is a public hearing in front of the Morris County Agricultural Development Board, to have its Site Specific Agricultural Management Practice application heard, said Frank Pinto, Backer Farm’s project manager and a spokesperson for the project.

Backer Farm has not been scheduled yet for the public hearing with the agricultural development board, Joe Barilla — the planning director of the Morris County Office of Planning and Preservation — told Patch in an email on Thursday.

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Barilla said Backer Farm has not been scheduled for the Agricultural Development Board’s public hearing on Friday and information will be posted on the board’s website here, once the hearing is scheduled.

It will be the first time that the farm will be able to present its proposal and have its expert testimony heard, Pinto said in a news release on Thursday and phone interview with Patch on Friday.

He said the zoning board’s decision means breweries are a permitted use, as long as at least 51 percent of the ingredients to produce the craft beer come from the farm.

He said Backer Farm plans to grow barley, which will be sent to a malthouse for processing after it is dried at the farm, the malthouse then returning the barley to the farm.

Pinto said the plans for the property would not be considered a bar in any way and would not have the ability to serve food, with it seeking a Limited Brewery License. Under the state’s rules and a 2019 special ruling, the limited brewery licensees must follow strict guidelines, including limits on events, on the premises and off, according to the special ruling from the state.

Susan Rubright — attorney for the applicants requesting the interpretation request from Brach Eichler LLC — told Patch in an email statement on Friday that her clients filed the request with the Zoning Board of Adjustment to ask if creating a two-story, 78-seat brewery with a tasting room, was a permitted agricultural use in a residential neighborhood. The two dissenting board members had similar questions, she said.

Rubright said her clients had concerns about noise, overflow parking and the possibility of late hours. She said the township has taken a stance against destination farms and that Backer Farms had not notified neighbors of their development plans before submitting an application to the planning board over the summer of 2021.

She said at the current time, her clients have not appealed the decision, but have 45 days to do so after the Zoning Board adopts a memorializing resolution.

"We do not know if we will appeal," she said.

Pinto said neighbors have been invited to the farm to ask questions, COVID-19 additionally sidelining plans for a larger-scale event for neighbors to come to the farm. He said when Backer Farm appeared in front of the planning board on July 1, experts who planned to testify about the farm’s application, were not able to do so because of time constraints, with the Zoom meeting file corrupted from the meeting.

Rubright said Backer Farm has not met with a “large group of concerned residents.”

“If they did, they would learn that most people did not move to Mendham Township to live near an amusement-like destination farm,” Rubright said.

Rubright said that many neighbors do not have an objection to a limited-capacity tasting room, but called the farm’s plans something that “has the potential to destroy the very things that most people associate with Mendham — peace, quiet and traditional farming.”

She said the July 1 Planning Board meeting had over 100 participants on the call, many expressing health and safety concerns and she expects the same for the upcoming County Agricultural Development Board’s meeting, once it is scheduled.

“As members of the Mendham community for nearly 100 years, the Backer family has always cared deeply about the place we call home,” Backer said. “We’ve taken great care in all aspects of the application process for our farm-based brewery project, and we look forward to continuing to work closely with Mendham and Morris County to ensure our project reflects our multigenerational commitment to our community and neighbors.”

To view Backer Farm’s application on the county’s website, click here and here for the County Agriculture Development Board meeting agendas and schedule.

Questions or comments about this story? Have a news tip? Contact me at: [email protected].

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More from Mendham-Chester

Thomas Keeling Mendham Township School Board Candidate

Mendham Township resident Thomas Keeling shares why he is running for the Mendham Township Board of Education.MENDHAM, NJ — The Mendham Township Board of Education has a contested election this fall, with three candidates who filed to run for two available, three-year seats; and two for one, two-year unexpired term.Thomas Keeling is one of the candidates for the two-year seat, along with Richard Gondek.The other ...

Mendham Township resident Thomas Keeling shares why he is running for the Mendham Township Board of Education.

MENDHAM, NJ — The Mendham Township Board of Education has a contested election this fall, with three candidates who filed to run for two available, three-year seats; and two for one, two-year unexpired term.

Thomas Keeling is one of the candidates for the two-year seat, along with Richard Gondek.

The other candidates on the ballot for the three-year seat include:

Dumovic is the only incumbent to put his hat back into the ring, for a three-year seat.

Editor's Note: Are you a candidate on the ballot? Patch sent out emails to all candidates to the email addresses listed for their campaign provided to the office of the clerk. The responses received will be published between now and the General Election. Candidates who would like to participate but did not receive one (for whatever reason) may contact [email protected].

Keeling’s responses to the questions are below:

1. Name: Thomas Keeling

2. Town of residence: Mendham Township

3. Position sought: Board of Education (2-year unexpired term)

4. Family: I am a long-term Mendham Township resident. My wife and I have five children who all have been educated in Mendham schools. Our youngest child is a student at Mendham Township Middle School.

5. Education:

6. Occupation: Strategic Finance/Business Executive/Attorney. Over the course of my career, I have held senior management positions in both Fortune 500 companies and emerging companies and have also served as a strategy consultant (Boston Consulting Group). During my career I have led and been responsible for most key business areas including strategy, corporate development, operations, finance, account management and general management. I have served as an advisor/consultant to many corporate clients on growth and strategic initiatives. For the past ten years I have worked for a specialty law and business advisory firm that specializes in strategic finance and mergers and acquisitions for middle market companies.

7. Previous or current elected appointed office: I have served on several volunteer boards but have never served on a school board.

8. Why are you seeking to run for school board? Our schools have done a great job of laying a solid foundation for our children and setting them up for success in high school and beyond and for life-long learning. Mendham Township is the only all Blue-Ribbon school district in the state of New Jersey and our schools rank at the very top of all New Jersey elementary and middle schools. I want to make sure that we keep it this way and that current and future students in our schools will continue to have even greater educational opportunities. As such, I am fully committed to making sure we invest appropriately to deliver all Mendham Township students a Best-in-Class education in an inclusive environment that promotes learning and individual development. My background and experience will help the School Board provide our students a best-in-class education while being fiscally responsible through fostering innovation (such as shared services). In the area of finance, I have specialized expertise in finance and feel that I can offer the Board assistance with financial oversight, creating solutions to financial challenges, helping with the budgeting process and making sure we get the most out of every tax dollar to support every student every day. As an attorney, I have participated in many continuing legal education programs focusing on education and special education law. I also have substantial experience in policy and planning and have been active in programs that support diversity and inclusivity.

As a board member, my key focus areas will be:

Please see my website, www.keeling4boe.com, for more information on each of these focus areas.In summary, I believe that my background, experience and team building style will permit me to be an effective contributor to the Board and ensure that we continue to offer a best-in-class education to our students in a fiscally responsible way.

9. What is your stance on masks in schools? I support our school district’s current COVID protocols and policies (including requiring the wearing of masks in school).

10. Should schools offer a virtual option? I think our district’s current approach is the right approach by providing full-day, full-time, in-person instruction to all students with appropriate contingency plans for pivoting if circumstances change. In-person learning is the best learning environment. We need, however, to make sure the virtual option is available if there is another surge in the pandemic and in-person teaching is no longer an option.

11. What other issues do you feel must be tackled in the school district? We need to make sure that we continue to offer our students the highest quality education to prepare them for success in high school and beyond. We must do this in a way that protects the health and safety of our students, teachers and staff. We must also do this in a way that is fiscally responsible way and make sure that we get the most out of every tax dollar. I believe that shared services is an area that needs to be pursued more purposefully by the Board by actively engaging with neighboring school districts to explore ways to effectively partner. Through effective use of shared services we can actually increase the programs and courses available to our students while also achieving operational (non-classroom) efficiencies. We also need to explore new (non-taxpayer funded) revenue sources for the district. There may be the opportunity for grant funds for additional STEM education and ways to increase revenues from our fleet of buses as two examples. Finally, we must ensure transparency and community engagement in all of the Board’s activities.

12. What sets you apart from the challenging candidates? As to what sets me apart from the other candidates, I think my deep finance, business and law background (MBA from Stanford/JD from Seton Hall) and years working in strategic finance and growing and managing companies is a crucial differentiator. I am very adept at establishing and executing against budgets and making sure there is real value being delivered for every budget dollar. Also, as an attorney, I have participated in many continuing legal education programs focusing on education and special education law and feel that these programs have given me a solid understanding of many of the challenges that school boards face. I am also firmly committed to promoting inclusiveness and celebrating diversity as part of the programs and policies of our school district and community. I am a founding member of the Keeling-Puri Peace Plaza. Since 2002, each September we have hosted approximately 1000 elementary school students for a celebration of the International Day of Peace which focuses on messages of mutual understanding, tolerance and respect. In 2020 and again this year, because of the Covid pandemic, we have moved to a virtual program and have provided Mendham Township and other school districts free programs and materials centered on the International Day of Peace and its messages on diversity and inclusiveness. Finally, I am known as a very effective collaborator. Over my career and in various volunteer settings, I have enjoyed working in collaborative group settings and have been very effective at building consensus and getting things done.

13. What else would you like to share about yourself or your campaign? First, I encourage people to visit my website: keeling4boe.com to learn more about me and my candidacy. Second, I am actively engaged as a volunteer to support our students and schools. I am Co-Chair of HSA Cultural Arts Committee and am also Co-Chair of MTMS/MTES Parents Advisory Council for Special Services. I also encourage people to visit the Keeling-Puri Peace Plaza website (keeling-puri-peaceplaza.com) to learn more about my long-term (20+-year) commitment to diversity and inclusivity.

Questions or comments about this story? Have a news tip? Contact me at: [email protected].

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Here are the 30 N.J. towns with the highest property tax bills

The average property tax bill in New Jersey was $9,284 in 2021, a $172 increase over the previous year and among the highest in the nation.In the Garden State’s most affluent communities, however, property taxes soared well above $21,000, with some homeowners seeing year-over-year increases of $700 or more on average.Still, there were some bright spots in 2021, with more municipalities in the top 30 seeing decreases or only slight increases in the average bill.Here are the 30 municipalities that had the highest ...

The average property tax bill in New Jersey was $9,284 in 2021, a $172 increase over the previous year and among the highest in the nation.

In the Garden State’s most affluent communities, however, property taxes soared well above $21,000, with some homeowners seeing year-over-year increases of $700 or more on average.

Still, there were some bright spots in 2021, with more municipalities in the top 30 seeing decreases or only slight increases in the average bill.

Here are the 30 municipalities that had the highest average property taxes last year:

30. North Caldwell

The average property tax bill in North Caldwell was $16,556 in 2021, an increase of $242 from the previous year. It is one of seven Essex County municipalities in the top 30.

29. Closter

Closter is one of 14 Bergen County municipalities in the top 30, more than any other county in the list.

The average homeowner paid $16,654 in 2021, an increase of $271 when compared with the previous year.

28. Old Tappan

This Bergen County borough fell four spots in the rankings thanks to a $479 drop in the average property tax bill. Homeowners in Old Tappan paid $16,680 on average in 2021.

27. Woodcliff Lake

Woodcliff Lake saw the biggest jump among municipalities in the top 30, with the average homeowner paying $16,804, an increase of $722 from the previous year.

26. Allenhurst

Homeowners in Allenhurst, one of three Monmouth county municipalities in the list, paid an average of $16,911, a $542 increase.

25. Maplewood

Maplewood, Essex County, saw the average property tax bill climb $511 to $17,143 in 2021.

The rise was on pace with the $522 jump in 2020 and the $479 climb in 2019, making the three-year increase a total of $1,512.

24. Westfield

The average homeowner in Westfield, one of only two Union County locales in the top 30, paid $17,319 in 2021. That’s an increase of $153, nearly twice the $78 jump homeowners saw in 2020.

23. Ho-Ho-Kus

Another Bergen County municipality, Ho-Ho-Kus saw its average property tax bill increase $453 to $17,340 in 2021.

22. Glen Rock

Glen Rock borough in Bergen County saw a relatively small increase of $81. The average property taxpayer here paid $17,454.

21. Cresskill

Homeowners in this Bergen County borough paid $17,614 on average in 2021, an increase of $378 from the previous year.

The jump is slightly higher than the $332 increase from 2019 to 2020.

20. Franklin Lakes

Property taxpayers in Franklin Lakes Borough, yet another Bergen County municipality, paid an average of $17,659, an $135 increase when compared with 2020.

19. Upper Saddle River

The average homeowner in this Bergen County borough paid $18,154, a decrease of $732 from the previous year.

That’s the biggest drop among towns on the top-30 list and a massive swing when compared with the $373 increase from 2019 to 2020.

18. Summit

Property taxpayers in Summit, Union County, also saw a drop in the average bill. Homeowners paid $18,254 on average in 2021, a decrease of $60 from the previous year.

17. Haworth

The average property tax bill in this Bergen County borough was $18,563 in 2021, a $293 increase over the previous year.

16. Saddle River

Saddle River homeowners paid $18,683 on average in 2021, a rise of $473.

That’s an improvement from the $708 jump in 2020, bringing the two-year increase to just under $1,200.

15. Ridgewood

Ridgewood Village, yet another Bergen County municipality in the top 30, had an average property tax bill of $18,998 in 2021. That’s an increase of $492 from the previous year.

Ridgewood homeowners paid $18,506 on average in 2020, $18,234 in 2019 and $17,970 in 2018.

14. Mantoloking

The average property tax bill in Mantoloking, the only Ocean County municipality in the list, fell $30 to $19,274 in 2021, a massive swing from the $892 increase in the previous year.

That brings the three-year increase on the average tax bill to $1,512.

13. Deal

Homeowners in this Monmouth County borough paid $19,757 on average in 2021, a $640 increase over the previous year.

Deal’s average residential property value of $3.04 million was the highest of all New Jersey municipalities.

12. South Orange

South Orange in Essex had an average property tax bill of $19,749 in 2021, an increase of $602 when compared with 2020.

11. Mendham

Property taxpayers in Mendham Township, one of only two Morris County municipalities in the list and home to former Gov. Chris Christie, paid $19,824 on average in 2021.

That’s a relatively modest increase of $30 when compared with the previous year.

10. Montclair

The average homeowner in Montclair Township, Essex County, paid $20,320 in 2021, a $357 increase over 2020.

9. Essex Fells

Essex Fells was one of four municipalities in the top 30 to see a drop in the average 2021 property tax bill. Homeowners paid $20,374 on average here, a decrease of $39.

8. Princeton

Homeowners in Princeton, the only Mercer County municipality in the top 30, paid $20,510 on average in 2021, a $158 increase over the previous year.

7. Alpine

The average homeowner in this affluent borough in Bergen County paid $21,438 in 2021, a $396 jump when compared with 2020.

Alpine is home to public figures and celebrities, including Kellyanne Conway, Chris Rock and former New York Yankees starting pitcher C.C. Sabathia. The borough had an average residential property value of $2.8 million in 2021.

6. Rumson

The average property tax bill in this Monmouth County borough rose $438 to $21,591 in 2021.

5. Glen Ridge

Property taxpayers in Glen Ridge had an average bill of $21,647, an increase of $433 when compared with the previous year.

4. Mountain Lakes

At $21,868, the average property tax bill in this Morris County borough climbed $243 when compared with 2020.

3. Tenafly

Homeowners in this Bergen County borough paid $21,966 on average in 2021, a $414 increase over the previous year.

2. Demarest

This borough had the highest average property tax bill in Bergen County, with homeowners paying $21,983 on average. That was a $606 increase over 2020, lifting Demarest two spots in the rankings.

1. Millburn

Topping the list yet again is Millburn, with an average property tax bill of $24,485 in 2021, an increase of $115 when compared with the previous year.

The average home in Millburn was valued at $1.3 million in 2021.

* Tavistock

Tavistock had the highest average property tax bill in New Jersey in 2021 at $30,715. While technically a municipality, this borough remains in a category all its own.

There were only three homes and roughly a dozen residents in Tavistock as of 2019. It was formed in 1929 so members of the Tavistock Country Club could bypass laws that prohibited golfing on Sunday, exemplifying the type of privilege that’s typically afforded to only the wealthy and politically connected.

The average property value in Tavistock was $1.7 million in 2021.

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Backer Farm Moves Forward In Brewery License Application In Mendham

Backer Farm will have its first public hearing before the Morris County Agricultural Development Board on Aug. 11. MENDHAM, NJ — After months of anticipation, a local preserved farm that hopes to convert its dairy barn into a farm-based brewery is finally moving one step closer to that goal.Backer Farm has been seeking permission to establish a brewery operation on their property, which currently has produce and livestock. The farm's plan was approved by the Mendham Township Zoning Board of Adjustment in Feb. 2022 with ...

Backer Farm will have its first public hearing before the Morris County Agricultural Development Board on Aug. 11.

MENDHAM, NJ — After months of anticipation, a local preserved farm that hopes to convert its dairy barn into a farm-based brewery is finally moving one step closer to that goal.

Backer Farm has been seeking permission to establish a brewery operation on their property, which currently has produce and livestock. The farm's plan was approved by the Mendham Township Zoning Board of Adjustment in Feb. 2022 with a 5-2 vote.

Following zoning approval, one of Backer Farm's next steps is a public hearing in front of the Morris County Agricultural Development Board to have its Site Specific Agricultural Management Practice application heard, according to Frank Pinto, Backer Farm's project manager and project spokesperson.

After months of waiting, the first public hearing date has finally arrived.

On Aug. 11 at 7:30 p.m., Backer Farm will present its application to the Morris County Agricultural Development Board. According to Pinto, this could be the first of several meetings, as the public hearing may take some time.

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The purpose of the meeting will be for Backer Farm to provide an overview of the application and introduce their witnesses, which will be Pinto.

Following the zoning approval, several Mendham residents expressed concerns about potential noise, overflow parking, and the possibility of late hours. These items are all expected to be addressed at the public hearing.

“We’ve taken great care in all aspects of the application process for our farm-based brewery project, and we look forward to continuing to work closely with Mendham and Morris County to ensure our project reflects our multigenerational commitment to our community and neighbors,” said Fred Backer of the family-owned farm in a previous statement.

According to Backer, the farm will grow crops for beer production and will brew and package the beer on-site. The dairy barn will have indoor and outdoor public areas where customers can learn about the beer-making process, tour the farm, sample beer, and buy beer for on- or off-site consumption.

Backer Farm, which is applying for a Limited Brewery License, would be subject to the new restrictions imposed by the New Jersey Division of Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC).

ABC imposed several restrictions on breweries, including limiting on-site events and requiring establishments to only allow patrons to consume their products on-site if they have taken a brewery tour. "Within the public portion of the brewery, each customer will be able to view the brewing equipment and information on the brewing process in accordance with ABC licensing regulations and may discuss the brewing process with trained staff," Backer said.

"Our farm has evolved since our beginning almost a century ago," Backer said "Agriculture is a constantly changing industry. We continue to evolve as the market for our products and services changes over time. Our planned farm-based brewery is just another way we are meeting the demands and addressing the current market trends in agriculture."

To view Backer Farm's application on the county's website, click here and here for the County Agriculture Development Board meeting agendas and schedule.

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Health Curriculum Updated For Mendham Middle School

The Mendham Township Board has updated the middle school Physical Education/Health Curriculum in preparation for the upcoming school year.MENDHAM, NJ — Ahead of the next school year, school officials shared some updates on the Mendham Township Middle School Physical Education/Health Curriculum.In recent months, the updated New Jersey Health and Physical Education Standards have been a hot topic. Some parents have expressed concern that the new standards include "age-inappropriate" content, while others have pr...

The Mendham Township Board has updated the middle school Physical Education/Health Curriculum in preparation for the upcoming school year.

MENDHAM, NJ — Ahead of the next school year, school officials shared some updates on the Mendham Township Middle School Physical Education/Health Curriculum.

In recent months, the updated New Jersey Health and Physical Education Standards have been a hot topic. Some parents have expressed concern that the new standards include "age-inappropriate" content, while others have praised them for being "inclusive" of the LGBTQ+ community.

At a recent Board of Education meeting, school officials announced that the middle school curriculum has been revised for the upcoming school year.

After being introduced in 2014, the health and physical education guidelines were revised in 2020 as part of the New Jersey Student Learning Standards (NJSLS). Certain lessons must be taught by the end of grades two, five, eight, and twelve, according to the standards.

According to the health and physical education guidelines, children should learn statements like "Individuals enjoy different activities and grow at different rates" and "All living things may have the capacity to reproduce" in second grade or earlier. Students should be taught by the end of fifth grade that "puberty is a time of physical, social, and emotional changes" and that "pregnancy can be achieved through a variety of methods."

The updated curriculum adopted by Mendham covers topics such as personal safety, social and emotional health, sexual health, nutrition, and family life, but individual lessons are tailored to each age group.

For example, in fifth grade, students learn about sexual abuse and violence in teen dating, but in sixth grade, they also learn about sexting, online safety, and sextortion.

Topics such as social and sexual health are not covered in depth until eighth grade when topics such as comparing the differences between healthy and unhealthy romantic and platonic relationships and identifying factors that are important in deciding when to engage in sexual behaviors are covered.

The parent opt-out sheets are available for all grade levels and are included in the curriculum folder on the Mendham Township School District website. School officials also stated that a letter would be sent to all households prior to the class to inform parents of the upcoming material.

The letter will also include a link to the health video that will be shown in the lessons so that parents can watch it first.

Throughout the school year, boys and girls will be separated by grade level for specific health units.

Mendham Township School District also recently implemented a new social-emotional learning (SEL) curriculum for all students in grades PK through 4. Mendham Township's elementary school curriculum units will be divided into sections like "self-awareness," "self-management," "social awareness," "responsible decision-making," and "relationship skills."

According to school officials, by promoting social and emotional learning, Mendham Township Elementary School hopes to improve the development of positive school climates and the healthy development of students.

To view the full updated middle school physical education/health curriculum, click here.

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