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Latest News in Mendham Township, NJ

Boys Basketball: Results, recaps, photos, and links for Thursday, Dec. 29

THURSDAY, DEC. 29Featured LinksThe N.J. High School Sports newsletter now appearing in mailboxes 5 days a week. Sign up now and be among the first to get all the boys and girls sports you care about, straight to your inbox each weekday. FEATURED COVERAGENo. 1 Roselle Catholic 54, The Patrick School 46South Plainfield 76 Scotch Plains-Fanwood 66Egg Harbor 39, Haddonfield 34Trenton 84, Medford Tech 55Glo...

THURSDAY, DEC. 29

Featured Links

The N.J. High School Sports newsletter now appearing in mailboxes 5 days a week. Sign up now and be among the first to get all the boys and girls sports you care about, straight to your inbox each weekday.

FEATURED COVERAGE

No. 1 Roselle Catholic 54, The Patrick School 46

South Plainfield 76 Scotch Plains-Fanwood 66

Egg Harbor 39, Haddonfield 34

Trenton 84, Medford Tech 55

Gloucester 74, Clayton 58

TOP 20 SCOREBOARD

STATEWIDE SCOREBOARD

Thursday, Dec. 29

Wildwood 61, MaST Charter (PA) 31 - Box Score

String Theory Charter (PA) 39, Winslow 37 - Box Score

St. Benedict's 67, National Christian (MD) 36 - Box Score

West Morris 56, Morris Catholic 44 - Box Score

Hunterdon Central 52, Wayne Valley 48 - Box Score

Promise Academy 1 Charter (NY) 75, Bogota 70 - Box Score

Payne Tech 75, Paterson Kennedy 67 - Box Score

Iselin Kennedy 56, Dayton 48 - Box Score

Burlington City 57, Lawrence 56 - Box Score

Ocean Township 46, Hopewell Valley 43 - Box Score

Don Bosco Prep 65, Corona Centennial (CA) 63 - Box Score

Nutley 66, Marion P. Thomas Charter 40 - Box Score

Westampton Tech 61, Williamstown 47 - Box Score

North Plainfield 47, Dunellen 24 - Box Score

Sparta 65, Newton 44 - Box Score

East Brunswick 60, New Brunswick 52 - Box Score

North Brunswick 65, South Brunswick 60 - Box Score

Blair 60, Westtown (PA) 49 - Box Score

Glen Rock 59, Norman Thomas (NY) 38 - Box Score

St. Joseph (Mont.) 61, Pascack Valley 49 - Box Score

Henry Hudson 54, South Amboy 42 - Box Score

South River 88, Keansburg 44 - Box Score

Pennington 57, Bordentown 45 - Box Score

Cherry Hill West 58, Mastery Camden 50 - Box Score

Cherry Hill East 79, Willingboro 51 - Box Score

Caldwell 63, Verona 46 - Box Score

Ridge 51, Livingston 44 - Box Score

Toms River North 52, Manchester Township 39 - Box Score

Middletown South 48, Central Regional 43 - Box Score

St. John Vianney 53, Toms River South 42 - Box Score

BCSL

Holy Cross Prep 49, Trenton Catholic 47 - Box Score

COLONIAL

Woodbury 66, Pennsauken 64 - Box Score

GMC

J.P. Stevens 58, Franklin 48 - Box Score

Manville 57, Highland Park 44 - Box Score

NJAC

OLYMPIC

SKYLAND

J.P. Stevens 58, Franklin 48 - Box Score

Immaculata 76, Bridgewater-Raritan 53 - Box Score

Manville 57, Highland Park 44 - Box Score

TRI-COUNTY

UCC

New Providence 59, Cranford 46 - Box Score

Roselle Catholic 54, Patrick School 46 - Box Score

Independent

Kingswood Oxford (CT) 71, Life Center 56 - Box Score

Roselle Catholic 54, Patrick School 46 - Box Score

The N.J. High School Sports newsletter now appearing in mailboxes 5 days a week. Sign up now and be among the first to get all the boys and girls sports you care about, straight to your inbox each weekday. To add your name, click here.

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Boys basketball: Results, recaps, photos and links for Monday, Dec. 19

Monday, Dec. 19Montclair Kimberley 49, Tiverton (RI) 28 - Box ScoreBCSLCAPE-ATLANTICCVCGMCIselin Kennedy 82, Wardlaw-Hartridge 23 - Box ScoreCalvary Christian (Old Bridge) 55, East Brunswick Magnet 43 - Box Score...

Monday, Dec. 19

Montclair Kimberley 49, Tiverton (RI) 28 - Box Score

BCSL

CAPE-ATLANTIC

CVC

GMC

Iselin Kennedy 82, Wardlaw-Hartridge 23 - Box Score

Calvary Christian (Old Bridge) 55, East Brunswick Magnet 43 - Box Score

HCIAL

NJAC

Morris Knolls 74, Montville 72 - Box Score

Boonton 68, Whippany Park 54 - Box Score

Hanover Park 63, Mountain Lakes 42 - Box Score

Parsippany 66, Morristown-Beard 52 - Box Score

NJIC

Wallington 49, Saddle Brook 47 - Box Score

OLYMPIC

SEC

North Star Academy 77, New Brunswick 47 - Box Score

Hudson Catholic 61, Shabazz 14 - Box Score

SHORE

Long Branch 45, Freehold Borough 42 - Box Score

St. Rose 56, Wall 44 - Box Score

Red Bank Regional 57, Middletown North 55 - Box Score

Freehold Township 61, Barnegat 48 - Box Score

Point Pleasant Boro 30, Neptune 29 - Box Score

Red Bank Catholic 55, Middletown South 52 - Box Score

SKYLAND

Montgomery 78, West Windsor-Plainsboro South 75 - Box Score

College Achieve Central 44, Belvidere 41 - Box Score

North Hunterdon 74, Steinert 37 - Box Score

Rutgers Prep 71, Hunterdon Central 29 - Box Score

TRI-COUNTY

Gloucester Tech 66, Salem Tech 41 - Box Score

Independent

Pennsauken Tech 54, Moorestown Friends 21 - Box Score

College Achieve Central 44, Belvidere 41 - Box Score

Newark Vocational 63, Paterson Arts 18 - Box Score

3 Takeaways From Mendham Township's Board Of Education Forum

The candidates discussed taxes, curriculum, policy-making and more at the forum last week.MENDHAM, NJ — Candidates for Mendham Township Board of Education seats face off in a debate hosted by The League of Women Voters last week in the media center of the township's Elementary School.At the end of this year, three three-year terms on the seven-member board will be available. Incumbents Rochelle Abraham, Andrew Christmann and Joan Mody are among the candidates, as is former township Mayor and Committeewoman Diana Orban B...

The candidates discussed taxes, curriculum, policy-making and more at the forum last week.

MENDHAM, NJ — Candidates for Mendham Township Board of Education seats face off in a debate hosted by The League of Women Voters last week in the media center of the township's Elementary School.

At the end of this year, three three-year terms on the seven-member board will be available. Incumbents Rochelle Abraham, Andrew Christmann and Joan Mody are among the candidates, as is former township Mayor and Committeewoman Diana Orban Brown.

Abraham, Mody and Christmann are running as a group, with Brown challenging them and running under the slogan "Transparency for Taxpayers."

The hour-long debate drew all four candidates, who answered questions submitted both in advance and on index cards written by members of the public.

During the forum, there was no audience participation allowed, but all questions posed to the candidates were generated by members of the public and screened by the League to eliminate duplicates and personal attacks.

Each candidate had 90 seconds for opening statements, 60 seconds for answering questions, 30 seconds for rebuttals and 90 seconds for closing statements.

Curriculum:

When asked about the highly debated state's sex education curriculum, all candidates agreed that parents were still able to maintain control and have the right to opt their children out of classes. Mody stated she thought that the lessons were age-appropriate and chosen by professionals.

Christmann agreed and highlighted that the curriculum has gone through a "rigorous process" to be approved before being presented to the public.

Brown agreed, noting that the current curriculum was similar to one from 2014, which was still available on the district's website. Brown also stated that, regardless of their stance, it is critical to hear and consider the concerns of parents, which was a sentiment agreed upon by all candidates.

Abraham praised the curriculum for emphasizing social and emotional learning standards, which she believes are intended to ensure student safety, such as how to identify bullying and how to care for oneself.

District Merger:

When asked if there was a possibility of a K-12 merger with the Chesters, Christmann said it was discussed a few years ago, but that while there could be significant benefits from being a larger district, there were concerns about the value of educational costs.

Abraham said the idea of a merger could be something worth exploring but they would need to consider how it would benefit the students.

Mody also agreed that it is something to consider and the board has considered a merger in the past, but that they would need to see what sort of benefits a merger would bring to the community.

Brown stated that she is in full support of a merger and believes that it would provide many benefits to the community.

Taxes:

Candidates were asked to consider ways to make school taxes more efficient, as they account for roughly 66 percent of the total property tax bill.

Mody defended the board, highlighting the district's various shared services which bring in revenue, particularly the district's busing contracts with other districts.

Brown agreed, calling school taxes "an investment," since the bulk of it goes toward tuition. Brown also claimed that while the busing was good, residents needed to see the profits, not just the revenues. "We have never seen an analysis of how much actually goes toward profits," Brown said.

Christmann stated that the board spends a significant amount of time attempting to reduce costs and reduce the burden on the taxpayer. According to Christmann, the best way to achieve that is through shared services.

Abraham agreed, saying that fiscal responsibility is crucial to the board. "Managing a budget to balance the needs of the students while being considerate of the taxpayer is essential," Abraham said.

When asked about taxpayers who do not have children in the K-8 district, all candidates agreed that, while a sizable proportion of township households do not have children in the district and are seniors living in town, the majority of those households approve of how the district is run.

The debate was live-streamed on YouTube and has been posted to the Morristown Area League of Women Voters YouTube page. To view the entire debate, click here.

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Meet Mendham Township Middle School's New Assistant Principal

This post was contributed by a community member. The views expressed here are the author's own.Nicholas Angrisani talks about education and reflects on some personal experiences as a student.Mendham Township, NEW JERSEY (October 18, 2022) – Mr. Nicholas Angrisani, is the newly appointed Assistant Principal of Mendham Township Middle School (MTMS). While he is getting to know educators, staff, and students at MTMS he took some time to talk about education and share some of his reflections on being a student himself....

This post was contributed by a community member. The views expressed here are the author's own.

Nicholas Angrisani talks about education and reflects on some personal experiences as a student.

Mendham Township, NEW JERSEY (October 18, 2022) – Mr. Nicholas Angrisani, is the newly appointed Assistant Principal of Mendham Township Middle School (MTMS). While he is getting to know educators, staff, and students at MTMS he took some time to talk about education and share some of his reflections on being a student himself.

For the past seven years, Mr. Angrisani was a Special Education Teacher and Technology Trainer at Hillsborough Middle School supporting literacy, science, social studies, and study skills. He is a Kean University alumnus with a master's degree from The University of Nottingham in England, and Principal Certification from Thomas Jefferson University.

Q. Can you provide a brief overview of your philosophy on education and managing student behavior? As soon as a child enters the academic world, we are helping them to prepare for life. When a student enters middle school, their learning environment transitions into a more self-reliant and independent structure. Instead of material being presented, students want to engage, to understand the relevance, and to be challenged. They want to discover! I firmly believe in optimizing instructional time by providing meaningful learning experiences for students. You can read about teamwork but collaborating with fellow students on a project is a far more enriching and meaningful experience. This is a good example of what I mean by optimizing instructional time. We have a rigorous curriculum in place to engage all of our students. We challenge our students while providing them with the necessary support to succeed and to grow. Most importantly, we continue to focus on supporting the growth of the “whole student.” We want our students to advance academically AND socially and emotionally.

When it comes to managing behavior, I am a firm advocate of restorative practices and positive reinforcement. Ideally, the focus includes identifying any learning opportunities. The goal is to advance, discover new options, and prevent a negative pattern being established.

Q. Can you share a childhood experience/memory that influenced and perhaps shaped your philosophy on education?As a child going to elementary, middle and then high school, I learned that trust is absolutely essential between the educator and the student. Not only is trust important for learning the required curriculum, but also for a child’s overall development and growth. If a child does not trust you then there is a “gulf” between the student and teacher that impairs the student’s ability to learn. Educators should strive to act as a mentor to their students, understanding that each child is different due to their culture, experiences, and socio-economic background. From a personal reflection, when a teacher or coach built a rapport with me based on trust, then my motivation and self-confidence increased dramatically. This reiterates the point I raised earlier, I believe that utilizing the “whole student approach” can ensure that each student can feel supported both in and out of school.

Q. We live in a fast-evolving environment (pandemic, technology advancements, media communications), can you suggest one or two questions that parents should be asking their children on a regular basis?“How was school today? Can you tell me something that you learned?” These openers may seem like simple questions, yet they are incredibly powerful in putting an emphasis on wanting to know what your child is thinking and doing when they are not with you during the day. Not only asking a child what they learned, but what they thought about the lesson is a nice way to open a dialogue and demonstrate interest in their reasoning capabilities. You may be surprised and impressed by their insights and the conclusions they are forming.

I am also a big advocate of parents asking their children if they want to go for a quick walk. Going outside and enjoying fresh air is great for getting everyone away from long “screen times.” I truly believe that time with the family is everything and going for a walk naturally starts everyone chatting without putting pressure on any one person.

Q. On a lighter note, if you were talking to a student, how would you finish this sentence: "Growing up, I … ."Growing up … well growing up, I made a discovery about myself. Growing up I learned to cook, and I learned that I loved to cook! It may seem a little unusual, but even as a child I began to enjoy researching ingredients for a dish, preparing them, and then creating a dish. I loved the reaction from my family and friends as we tasted the dish I had prepared. When I was in middle school, I began to up my game, and would even prepare a full meal! Everyone in my life supported me with their enthusiasm, I enjoyed making people happy, and I have great memories of conversations around some of the meals I had made. So, I would say to students that growing up, I found I could learn to do something that made me very happy and I would encourage students today to take time and maybe try some new things. You never know, you may surprise yourself with how much fun you are having as you learn to do something new.

Thank you, Mr. Angrisani for taking the time to talk and share your insights with us.

The views expressed in this post are the author's own. Want to post on Patch?

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Meet Mendham Township Elementary School's New Assistant Principal

This post was contributed by a community member. The views expressed here are the author's own.Michal Ferenc shares some insights on education and offers some practical suggestions for connecting with students.Mendham Township, NEW JERSEY (October 6, 2022) – With the 2022-2023 school year well underway, we had an opportunity to speak with the newly appointed Assistant Principal of Mendham Township Elementary School (MTES), Mr. Michal Ferenc, and gather his insights on education and connecting with elementary-aged studen...

This post was contributed by a community member. The views expressed here are the author's own.

Michal Ferenc shares some insights on education and offers some practical suggestions for connecting with students.

Mendham Township, NEW JERSEY (October 6, 2022) – With the 2022-2023 school year well underway, we had an opportunity to speak with the newly appointed Assistant Principal of Mendham Township Elementary School (MTES), Mr. Michal Ferenc, and gather his insights on education and connecting with elementary-aged students.

Members of the community may already know Mr. Ferenc, as he had previously served as Sixth Grade Social Studies Teacher and Technology Integration Specialist at the Middle School in Mendham Township. In both roles, he had the opportunity to work with teachers at all grade levels and subjects at the middle school. Mr. Ferenc was born in Poland and came with his family to the United States when he was five years old. He completed his Master's Degree in Educational Leadership at Montclair State University and acquired his Principal and Supervisor certification in 2017.

Q. Can you provide a brief overview of your philosophy on education and managing student behavior? I believe that every child can learn and that we, as educators, are responsible for providing a well-rounded education with the necessary foundational academic and social/emotional skills to realize their full potential. These skills include the ability to be able to read and process information, explain thoughts and ideas through written and expressive language, and understand mathematical concepts. All of these skills, by being built upon incrementally from early childhood, provide learners with the foundations to pursue any dreams they will have in the future. In addition to these foundational academic skills, schools also have a responsibility to ensure that students have a strong social and emotional foundation to persevere and overcome the obstacles of life.Sometimes certain obstacles may impede a student’s ability to learn, and it is the duty of the school, in partnership with the parents/guardians, to identify the root-cause of the issue and develop an action plan to help the student find success. Which leads to my belief that early intervention is key to helping students make up any skill deficits impeding their development and putting them back on track with peers. Without interventions, students who struggle as readers in first grade will probably continue to struggle in fourth grade and the gap between these learners and their peers continues to widen. These learners are also perceptive of their struggles which in turn may manifest as issues with motivation, behavior, and/or confidence. Which is why it is so important to take into account the whole story of the child when attempting to help a struggling student get back on track and to remember that what we see on the surface are symptoms of an underlying issue that we need to discover and address.

Q. Can you share a childhood experience/memory that influenced and perhaps shaped your philosophy on education?This leads on from my previous answer that every child deserves to learn to read and write, and a child is not responsible for their circumstances. In my own personal experience as a five-year old coming from a non-English speaking country, this belief resonates strongly with me. My educators were pivotal and essential in providing me with a great education and inspiring my academic career. I moved from Poland at the age of five and was fortunate to have great teachers that were willing to put in extra time and effort to help myself and other children acquire the language and assimilate to the culture. They helped me to succeed academically and to excel as a member of my new community. It is because of their commitment to teaching that I knew and felt that I belonged and had opportunities to succeed! I often think about how different my life would have been had I not had those same teachers. I see that same care and commitment with the teaching force at Mendham Township School District and look forward to continuing to support it. As I said, regardless of any student’s circumstances, everyone deserves the opportunity to learn and to be able to participate successfully as a member of their community.

Q. We live in a fast-evolving environment (pandemic, technology advancements, media communications), can you suggest one or two questions that parents should be asking their children on a regular basis?A great dialogue to have with your children on a regular basis is to discuss what may be the peaks and valleys of their day, and to be ready to also share what may have happened during your own day. Children need to understand that you are also human and not every day may go exactly as you want. Even as an adult, you have your own obstacles. It is a great opportunity to model resilience and grit.Another gentle opener with younger children is to ask them what they think the future will look like. Ask them if there is anything happening in the world that they have heard about that does not make sense to them. As much as we would like to protect our children from some of the events of the world, we cannot always control what they hear from peers. This way they can have a platform to share what they are hearing and provide you with an opportunity to discuss events at an age-appropriate level.

Q. On a lighter note, if you were talking to a student, how would you finish this sentence: "Growing up, I ..."Growing up, I loved to get mail addressed to me. It was great to see something in the mailbox addressed to me. I felt like a grown-up. Now, when I get mail it’s only bills and advertisements! So students, enjoy this time. At school you may use your writing skills to prepare cards and thank you notes for parents, teachers, members of the services, and other community members. Remember your notes are probably their favorite mail that they will receive that day!

Thank you, Mr. Ferenc, for taking the time to share your insights with us. We look forward to catching up with Mr. Nicolas Angrisani, Assistant Principal of Mendham Township Middle School, for an upcoming news article.

The views expressed in this post are the author's own. Want to post on Patch?

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