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Acupuncture in Jefferson Township, NJ

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Latest News in Jefferson Township, NJ

Ready, Set, Paint a Library Window!

The date has been set for Saturday, June 10 (rain or shine) for the Jefferson Arts Committee’s first ever youth-oriented Window Painting Contest! The event is open to all Jefferson Township students who are in 6th through 12th grades whether they attend in district, out of district, or are homeschooled. It was just announced that teams can be composed of 2 or 4 students (can include different aged students within the established grade brackets), and any individual students wishing to part...

The date has been set for Saturday, June 10 (rain or shine) for the Jefferson Arts Committee’s first ever youth-oriented Window Painting Contest! The event is open to all Jefferson Township students who are in 6th through 12th grades whether they attend in district, out of district, or are homeschooled. It was just announced that teams can be composed of 2 or 4 students (can include different aged students within the established grade brackets), and any individual students wishing to participate will be assigned to a registered team.

Students are being given the opportunity to use their artistic talents to use the windows at the Jefferson Township Public Library or the front doors of the Jefferson Township Municipal Building as their canvas. Each team will choose a summer theme of their own or incorporate the library’s 2023 summer reading program theme “All Together Now.” Each team will register with the JAC, submit their design idea for approval, and be assigned a library window measuring 45” wide by 41” long or a glass panel entrance door at the municipal building. The JAC will provide water-based acrylic paints in red, white, green, yellow, blue, and black (participants can have fun mixing these basic colors to create others!). The JAC will also provide some brushes, painters’ tape, and drop cloths. Participants should bring some of their own thin tip paint brushes, their own coverups to protect their clothing, and perhaps some plastic gloves. A small stepstool might be a good idea as well. Teams will be supervised by parents/guardians of the participants as well as JAC members. A morning start time and an afternoon start time if needed will be decided once registrations are complete.

The JAC will ask community residents to vote onsite for the painted canvases (windows or doors) in pre-determined categories, and gift cards and other prizes will be awarded accordingly on another date.

Any students who are interested should email [email protected] or call 973-697-3828 to register with their name(s), grade, school, and telephone number. Parents/guardians may email/call on behalf of their children if they prefer. To be sure there will be enough supplies, registrations will be accepted until June 1.

Donations to help cover expenses will gratefully be accepted and can be mailed to Jefferson Arts Committee, Window Decorating Contest, PO Box 2604, Oak Ridge, NJ 07438. Any business owner wishing to donate any supplies would also be appreciated – call 973-697-3828 to discuss.

There are quite a few “canvases” ready to be painted so gather up some friends and classmates to form those teams and be sure to register!

Jefferson Teachers Among 10,000 In NJ To Make $99K Or More

JEFFERSON, NJ – The Department of Education has released its annual list of teachers and their salaries for 2019 and the list of educators making $100,000 or more — a list that barely had any teachers on it more than a decade ago — has grown in recent years.Here in Jefferson that list includes educators with decades of experience. It is also important to note that some of these teachers are supervisors, work on curriculum and coach. It is also worth noting this group is a small fraction of the more than 100,000 peopl...

JEFFERSON, NJ – The Department of Education has released its annual list of teachers and their salaries for 2019 and the list of educators making $100,000 or more — a list that barely had any teachers on it more than a decade ago — has grown in recent years.

Here in Jefferson that list includes educators with decades of experience. It is also important to note that some of these teachers are supervisors, work on curriculum and coach. It is also worth noting this group is a small fraction of the more than 100,000 people who teach in public and charter schools in this state. But the highest earners also come from all different schools — not just the so-called "wealthy" districts that routinely rank highly on national and state lists for best schools.

This information is public, and the salaries are paid out from taxpayer money which is generally a source of interest. Some districts who have teachers higher up on the salary guide are obligated to use a larger portion of their annual budget to pay it out. The charge of the local school boards is to honor the financial commitments while making capital improvements and staying within the two percent annual tax cap.

Here are the teachers in our district who earn the top salaries, with their school, their school district and, finally, their salaries (the teachers have been divided by their years of experience):

In 2018-2019, the median salary for teachers totaled $68,985, according to a Patch analysis of salary data for public school districts and charter schools. The increase was about 1.6 percent higher than the previous year. Patch previously reported the complete list, for those looking to see other districts.

Find out what's happening in Jeffersonwith free, real-time updates from Patch.

The Department of Education has said the department double-checks the data before delivering it to the media.

Thanks for reading! Learn more about posting announcements or events to your local Patch site. Have a news tip you'd like to share? Or maybe you have a press release you would like to submit or a correction you'd like to request? Send an email to [email protected]

Subscribe to your local Patch newsletter. You can also have them delivered to your phone screen by downloading, or by visiting the Google Play store.

Medical Center Replaces Long-Closed Morris Co. Pathmark Supermarket

MORRIS COUNTY, NJ — Only two years after breaking ground in Jefferson Township, Commercial Realty Group (CRG), a second-generation family-owned firm, has resurrected another property, now known as The Advanced Medical Center – Jefferson.The building, which had once been a Pathmark grocery store, is now the Advanced Medical Center – Jefferson, a fully leased, 45,000-square-foot Class A medical office building.CRG paid $1.86 million for the run-down, closed Pathmark grocery store and surrounding tract in 2018 &n...

MORRIS COUNTY, NJ — Only two years after breaking ground in Jefferson Township, Commercial Realty Group (CRG), a second-generation family-owned firm, has resurrected another property, now known as The Advanced Medical Center – Jefferson.

The building, which had once been a Pathmark grocery store, is now the Advanced Medical Center – Jefferson, a fully leased, 45,000-square-foot Class A medical office building.

CRG paid $1.86 million for the run-down, closed Pathmark grocery store and surrounding tract in 2018 – and by 2019, had begun the site and building alterations required to transform the market into a functioning medical facility.

The building had a soft opening in late June, and no one is more excited about it than Jefferson Township Mayor Eric Wilsusen.

“The building site at 757 Rt. 15, Jefferson Twp., has made an impressive shift from an eyesore to an eye-catching medical center, following an astounding and total transformation, again returning the site to the business world,” Wilsusen said. “I am extremely pleased to recognize this local and unique building site reborn to a new life following several years of sitting vacant and unproductive. ”

Interested in local real estate?Subscribe to Patch's new newsletter to be the first to know about open houses, new listings and more.

CRG owns and manages nearly two dozen properties totaling $2.4 million square feet of industrial and medical office space.

Tri-County Orthopedics had previously hired CRG to renovate its Cedar Knolls headquarters, and the two became construction partners. When Tri-County decided to open a second location in northern Morris County, the two decided to work together again.

Following an extensive search, the company settled on the former Pathmark site at 757 Route 15 in Jefferson Township. The site is strategically located between the north and southbound lanes of I-80, making it an ideal location for the Advanced Medical Center and its many medical patients in the region, CRG said.

The $3.85 million project included a complete renovation, including major site improvements to increase parking at the property to a ratio of five spaces per 1,000 square feet, the installation of a patient drop-off area and the modernization of the building's loading area in the back.

There was also extensive new landscaping, which required excavation, as well as a new modern roof installed on the entire building to ensure energy efficiency and longevity.

"This was quite an achievement by the construction workers and managers alike, and an opportunity for them as well, as the project employed 50 tradespeople. It is also important to note that following its completion, The Advanced Medical Center – Jefferson, now houses 175 full-time employees," CRG said.

The largest tenant, Tri-County, occupies 17,000 square feet. Other tenants include Sportscare (physical rehabilitation), ARMAC (durable medical equipment), Advanced Vascular (vascular care), and ImageCare (imaging).

“We in Jefferson Township applaud the efforts and investment made by Commercial Realty Group in our hometown,” Wilsusen said.

Election 2020: Jefferson School Board Candidate Stacey Poulas

Patch sent out questions to candidates seeking public office locally. Here was one response:NEW JERSEY - In a few short weeks what is expected to be one of the most charged elections in modern history is set to take place and Patch has asked local candidates to share their thoughts before the Nov. 3 election.Editor's Note: Patch sent out emails to all candidates to the email addresses listed for their campaign provided to the county clerk. The responses received will be published between now and the general election. ...

Patch sent out questions to candidates seeking public office locally. Here was one response:

NEW JERSEY - In a few short weeks what is expected to be one of the most charged elections in modern history is set to take place and Patch has asked local candidates to share their thoughts before the Nov. 3 election.

Editor's Note: Patch sent out emails to all candidates to the email addresses listed for their campaign provided to the county clerk. The responses received will be published between now and the general election. Candidates who would like to participate but did not receive one (for whatever reason) can contact [email protected]. What you see below are their answers with mild style edits.

Why are you seeking a seat on the school board?

Jefferson needs to keep moving forward - to achieve educational excellence while being financially conservative. We need to learn from our past and stay focused on our future. The needs of our students are constantly changing, and we, as a district and community, need to support our students – continuing to implement best practices for college and career readiness and academic success.

The single most pressing issue facing our school district is _______, and this is what I intend to do about it.

Find out what's happening in Jeffersonwith free, real-time updates from Patch.

The single most pressing issue facing our school district is the reduction in state aid (Covid-19 is a pressing issue and that is addressed in question below). The timing of the reduction also put our district in a very difficult position. Our district was given a state aid figure and a preliminary budget was created. Unfortunately, our district then lost more funding. The Administration along with the Building, Needs and Finance Committee worked tirelessly to create a budget to present to the community that maintained as many student programs as possible. As a Board of Education, it is extremely important we uphold our responsibility to the community to stay informed of changes in our district and always be thinking outside the box. Recent examples include restructuring the District Supervisors responsibilities instead of replacing a District Supervisor and closely examining all salaries of new hires. We need to pay attention to surrounding districts for ideas and not be afraid to take risks. Being transparent with the community when we face hardships is important. Last Spring, when we learned of the reduction in state aid, the community came together for a letter writing campaign. We are very fortunate to work closely with the elementary PTAs and the Jefferson Township Education Foundation. Although our town has faced some difficult times, it is imperative that we keep “Jefferson Strong” and do what is right for our students.

What are the critical differences between you and the other candidates seeking to serve on the school board? If unopposed, describe the issues that define your campaign platform.

I have been serving on the Jefferson Board of Education for nine years. During my time on the JTBOE, I have served on the following committees: Education; Policy and Personnel; Building, Needs and Finance; and Community Relations. I am currently the Vice President of the Board of Education, a co-liason to the JTEF and serve on two committees (Education and Policy & Personnel). I pride myself on being an educated Board Member – meaning that I attend meetings, spend time researching current issues and listen to the community. I am able to think about issues we face as a parent, tax payer, board member and teacher. It is important to note that although I cannot participate in negotiations since I am in the NJEA, I am able to support teachers by relating to real issues teachers in NJ face today, hear concerns of teachers and bring them to the attention of the full board.

What accomplishments in your past would you cite as evidence you will be effective on the school board?

Since I began serving on the Jefferson Township Board of Education in 2011, Jefferson has maintained the 2% cap for the last nine years. Even while staying within the cap, we have implemented new curricula and improved facilities. Additionally, while serving on the JTBOE improvements have been made to our facilities (Turf Field, Auditorium, Referendum passed), implemented Full Day Kindergarten, new curricula implemented - ELA, Math & NGSS, opened two academies at JTHS and participated in hiring Chief School Administrators.

Recovering from COVID-19 is going to put a significant financial strain on the schools. With so much of our tax dollars going to support them. But cuts will still be needed. Where do you see room for budget improvement? What things will you go to the mat to defend?

Covid-19 has created many strains on districts and communities; it reaches beyond financial strains. We must strive to have our students return to school safely. Districts have had to make decisions – with information constantly changing and stay within the set executive order guidelines. Covid-19 is impacting academics, social – emotional learning, staffing and finances. Financially, districts have spent money that was not allotted in their budgets for this pandemic. Our district has received CARES funding. The funds must be used to address health and safety measures necessary to support reopening for in-person instruction and to support students during periods of remote learning. It is imperative that our students continue to receive a quality education and are allowed opportunities to participate in clubs and athletics. We must not allow, nor accept, our students to be a casualty of the lack of funding. It is our responsibility to provide our students with the best education possible and prepare them for their next phase.

The COVID-19 pandemic has put into focus the issue of mandatory vaccinations. If such a movement gains traction, where do you stand on the issue for your community?

When a policy is recommended for approval, the Policy and Personnel Committee reviews the policy in committee and then it goes to the full Board for approval and adoption. In the case of vaccines, each state decides which vaccines are required for enrollment. In our case, the New Jersey Department of Health mandates the vaccines. Public schools in New Jersey are required to maintain a summary record of student immunizations. Therefore, in this case, the policy will be mandated by the State and not up to the BOE.

Since the change to this year's election was announced by Murphy, there have been many questions about how the process will work. Below is some further reading on the Nov. 3 election process:

A primarily vote-by-mail election means a lot of changes to election day. See what you can expect this November.

Those not needing an ADA compliant booth will need a provisional ballot to vote in-person. Here is what that will look like.

There was language on the primary ballots asked voters certify they requested the ballot, even if they didn't.

Voters wondering how their signatures are checked before the upcoming election can see the process for themselves.

Need to register for the upcoming election? Want to track your vote once you do? Read on to learn how.

Here is a recap of important dates to remember with upcoming election, all in one place.

Confusion and concern has reigned as ballots arrive, here Patch got some answers from a county clerk.

Thanks for reading! Learn more about posting announcements or events to your local Patch site. Have a news tip you'd like to share? Or maybe you have a press release you would like to submit or a correction you'd like to request? Send an email to [email protected]Subscribe to your local Patch newsletter. You can also have them delivered to your phone screen by downloading, or by visiting the Google Play store.

How Jefferson Township Public Teachers Salary Rank In New Jersey

JEFFERSON, NJ — Getting a six-figure salary as a teacher isn't impossible anymore – even as many New Jersey school districts are dealing with declining state aid. Indeed, one New Jersey school district has an annual median pay of $113,869 while 19 others earn $90,000 or more.After delays caused by the COVID crisis, the state released information to Patch this week that shows how much your school district, special services district, vocational district and charter school have been paying teachers this past year.Teach...

JEFFERSON, NJ — Getting a six-figure salary as a teacher isn't impossible anymore – even as many New Jersey school districts are dealing with declining state aid. Indeed, one New Jersey school district has an annual median pay of $113,869 while 19 others earn $90,000 or more.

After delays caused by the COVID crisis, the state released information to Patch this week that shows how much your school district, special services district, vocational district and charter school have been paying teachers this past year.

Teachers in the Jefferson Township district are paid below the state media average for educational professionals, New Jersey public education data shows. Teachers on average made $67,212 during the current academic year, which ranks 319th among teachers statewide. Despite being paid less than many of their colleagues, teachers in the district did receive a 7.4 percent increase in pay from 2019-20, which ranks 72nd among state educators, data shows.

A full list of the state rankings for salaries and how much teacher’s pay either increase or dipped can be found here.

The information is part of the state Department of Education's Taxpayer's Guide to Education Spending that was just released, showing the median salary in every New Jersey school district and charter school.

Find out what's happening in Jeffersonwith free, real-time updates from Patch.

“For decades, the Department of Education’s annual guide has provided members of the public with insight and information about the expenditures of their public school district,” said Angelica Allen-McMillan, acting commissioner of the state Department of Education. “This kind of transparent, unfiltered information can be the first step toward helping residents better understand the needs and priorities of their local schools.”

Read more: Gov. Murphy Releases New NJ State Aid Figures For Schools

Overall, 231 school districts make more than the state median of $70,815, a 2 percent increase over the previous year. And it's not just the big towns or the regional districts that pay the most: Indeed, Ocean City is a great place to get a teaching job, where the median salary is $91,865. So is West Orange, which has a median salary of $90,172.

Patch also determined the difference in salaries between 2019 and 2020. Northfield in Atlantic County had the biggest increase, shooting to $78,482, a 45.71 percent increase. Stone Harbor in Cape May County had the biggest decrease, sinking to $67,565, a -18.68 percent drop.

The salary increases came to many districts despite suffering losses in state aid and the rising costs of getting kids back to school amid the COVID crisis.

In addition to median salaries, the state Department of Education site also shows each district's total spending, average daily enrollment and students from sending districts, the per-pupil costs and the district's total budget spending for 2019 and 2020.

Patch editor Tom Davis contributed reporting to this report.

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