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Latest News in Mine Hill, NJ

Roxbury Wants Answers About County Concrete Plan

ROXBURY, NJ – Taken by surprise by County Concrete Corp.’s plan to fill in part of a local lake and reroute the Black River, the township recently peppered the state with 22 questions and comments about the project.The concrete company has asked the state Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) for permission to fill in a section of Rutgers Pond, also ...

ROXBURY, NJ – Taken by surprise by County Concrete Corp.’s plan to fill in part of a local lake and reroute the Black River, the township recently peppered the state with 22 questions and comments about the project.

The concrete company has asked the state Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) for permission to fill in a section of Rutgers Pond, also known as Sunset Lake. The body of water, created by many years of quarrying, lies on the Roxbury/Mine Hill border adjacent to County Concrete's Kenvil facility.

In its nearly

, County Concrete proposes to spend seven years to 10 years filling in about 16 acres of the 56-acre pond. It wants to use, as fill, “sifted native soils” currently being stored at its Kenvil plant.

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'Additional Land Mass?'

In a letter to the DEP, Roxbury Township Manager John Shepherd said town officials have many “questions and concerns with respect to the application” and he asked the state to take Roxbury’s input into consideration prior to the issuance of any permit.

The first question asked in Shepherd’s letter relates to potential uses for the “new land” that would be created.

“The fill activity will enlarge three existing residential developed and zoned properties,” he wrote. “Will the additional land mass provide an opportunity for further development of the properties and/or residential subdivision? Can the new land be taxed (currently farmland assessed) or does any DEP regulation prohibit additional taxation?”

Shepherd’s letter notes County Concrete currently has three quarry/mining/extraction operations taking place in Roxbury. It said the company should be required to complete those operations before winning approval for the new project “so the disruption to adjacent residents can cease” to occur.

“The Township is concerned that fill for these projects will be diverted for the Black River Restoration and the impacts to the Roxbury residents will continue for a longer period,” wrote Shepherd. “The Township is opposed to any material being used for fill which has been generated at some location other than the County Concrete quarrying operations in Roxbury and Mine Hill townships.”

The township also wants to know the source of topsoil that would be used once the fill material is in place. “While the fill material may come from sites in Roxbury or Mine Hill townships, where is the source of topsoil coming from? Organic matter will be needed for plant and seed installation. In addition, clay material is specified to stabilize the channel bed and banks,” says the letter.

Thousands of Trucks

Shepherd says town officials are concerned about truck traffic on local roads. He notes that County Concrete proposes to use nearly 600,000 cubic yards of fill material for the project. “That amount equals approximately 30,000 to 35,000 truckloads or 60,000 to 70,000 truck trips,” says the letter, adding that the use by those trucks of Green Lane would be a big problem.

“Green Lane is a narrow, residential road which is in poor condition and would be heavily damaged by this significant truck traffic,” Shepherd wrote. “As such, Roxbury Township is opposed to the utilization of Green Lane or any other township street which has residential property uses for accessing the site via truck. The Township is concerned with the wear and tear on any road within the township over the course of a 7- to 10-year time frame.”

The letter says Roxbury also “objects to any work at the site, including delivery of material, between the hours of 6 p.m. and 8 a.m. It asks for details about the “landscape restoration” being proposed, as well as a plan for future site maintenance.

“How are downstream properties protected from flooding and erosion as the stream embankments become established?” Shepherd asks. “Continuous monitoring and maintenance are necessary over the anticipated 7- to 10-year construction period to establish the embankment. The construction duration is concerning since there will be significant time periods where there will not be any construction activity, especially between May 1 and July 31, to protect spawning fish in the pond. Any control measures which have been compromised will have negative sediment deposition downstream of the project area.”

Water Table Worries

The final point raised in Shepherd’s letter relates to the project’s potential impact on private wells in the area. It points out that County Concrete proposes pumping up to 750 gallons of water per minute of water.

“Will pumping lower the water elevation for an extended period?” asks Shepherd. “If so, will there be a negative impact to the existing private wells in the area? Roxbury Township private well owners have, recently, experienced negative impacts from water pumping activities related to County Concrete mining/pumping operations.”

In an email, Shepherd said there has been no direct communication between County Concrete and the township about the project. Town officials have expressed their unhappiness.

"They want to reroute the Black River and that certainly goes through my ward," said Roxbury Deputy Mayor Jaki Albrecht, a Kenvil resident, at the Roxbury Township Council's Aug. 9 meeting. "I'm not pleased with that at all."

At that meeting, both Roxbury Mayor Jim Rilee and Shepherd said the town was taken by surprise by the proposal. "I have spoken with Russ (Stern), our planning director, who is looking at the project as possibly land development, soil moving and something that would go in front of our planning board," Shepherd told the council.

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How much snow fell across the Tri-State area

NEW YORK (WABC) -- Parts of the Tri-State area received their first taste of snow this season on December 11-12, 2022.Here are the latest reports from the National Weather Service:Connecticut...Fairfield County...4 NNW New Fairfield 3.3 in 0430 AM 12/12 Trained SpotterShelton 2.4 in 0755 PM 12/11 Cocorahs3 E New Fairfield 2.2 in 0855 PM 12/11 PublicBethel 2.0 in 0700 PM 12/11 PublicRidgefield 1.5 in 0500 PM 12/11 Amateur RadioBridgeport Airport 0.8 in 0700 AM 12/12 Official NWS...

NEW YORK (WABC) -- Parts of the Tri-State area received their first taste of snow this season on December 11-12, 2022.

Here are the latest reports from the National Weather Service:

Connecticut

...Fairfield County...

4 NNW New Fairfield 3.3 in 0430 AM 12/12 Trained Spotter

Shelton 2.4 in 0755 PM 12/11 Cocorahs

3 E New Fairfield 2.2 in 0855 PM 12/11 Public

Bethel 2.0 in 0700 PM 12/11 Public

Ridgefield 1.5 in 0500 PM 12/11 Amateur Radio

Bridgeport Airport 0.8 in 0700 AM 12/12 Official NWS Obs

Norwalk 0.5 in 0720 PM 12/11 Broadcast Media

...Middlesex County...

Clinton 1.7 in 0220 AM 12/12 Broadcast Media

Westbrook 1.6 in 1140 PM 12/11 Trained Spotter

...New Haven County...

Hamden 3.6 in 0700 AM 12/12 Trained Spotter

1 E North Haven 3.0 in 1115 PM 12/11 Trained Spotter

North Haven 2.5 in 0730 PM 12/11 Trained Spotter

Seymour 2.0 in 0751 PM 12/11 Trained Spotter

Guilford 1.8 in 0800 PM 12/11 Trained Spotter

1 SW Branford 1.6 in 0700 AM 12/12 Trained Spotter

...New London County...

Groton 2.3 in 0600 AM 12/12 Trained Spotter

New Jersey

...Bergen County...

2 NNE Franklin Lakes 2.8 in 1245 AM 12/12 Trained Spotter

1 WSW Washington Township 0.5 in 0600 PM 12/11 Trained Spotter

Mahwah 0.3 in 0315 PM 12/11 Trained Spotter

...Essex County...

North Caldwell 0.5 in 0540 PM 12/11 Trained Spotter

...Hudson County...

Harrison 0.2 in 0230 AM 12/12 CO-OP Observer

...Hunterdon County...

Lebanon 2.8 N 0.2 in 0640 AM 12/12 COCORAHS

Holland Twp 2.6 NNE T in 0545 AM 12/12 COCORAHS

Flemington 3 E T in 0655 AM 12/12 COOP

...Mercer County...

Trenton Mercer Airport T in 1200 AM 12/12 ASOS

Hopewell Twp. 2.4 NW T in 0700 AM 12/12 COCORAHS

...Monmouth County...

1 SW Long Branch T in 0600 AM 12/12 CO-OP Observer

...Morris County...

Jefferson Twp 3.1 WSW 3.0 in 0700 AM 12/12 COCORAHS

Hopatcong 2.1 ENE 3.0 in 0735 AM 12/12 COCORAHS

Lake Hopatcong 3.0 in 0844 AM 12/12 Trained Spotter

Green Pond 2.7 in 0500 AM 12/12 Trained Spotter

2 NW Green Pond 2.5 in 0755 PM 12/11 Trained Spotter

Kinnelon 1.4 SE 2.5 in 0700 AM 12/12 COCORAHS

Mine Hill Twp. 2.0 in 0800 AM 12/12 COCORAHS

Butler 1.7 in 0655 PM 12/11 Trained Spotter

Rockaway 1.7 in 0800 AM 12/12 COCORAHS

1 N Denville 1.5 in 1145 PM 12/11 Trained Spotter

Rockaway 1.4 in 0500 PM 12/11 Trained Spotter

Randolph Twp. 2 E 1.4 in 0800 AM 12/12 COCORAHS

Randolph 1.3 in 0530 PM 12/11 Public

Denville Twp 1.5 ESE 1.0 in 0700 AM 12/12 COCORAHS

1 SE Boonton 1.0 in 0700 AM 12/12 CO-OP Observer

2 NNE Brookside 0.8 in 0500 PM 12/11 Trained Spotter

Washington Twp. 3.6 W 0.2 in 0700 AM 12/12 COCORAHS

1 SW Schooleys Mountain 0.2 in 0700 AM 12/12 CO-OP Observer

1 W Morristown 0.2 in 0730 AM 12/12 COCORAHS

Chatham 0.1 in 0805 AM 12/12 Public

Harding Twp 2.4 W T in 0700 AM 12/12 COCORAHS

Madison 0.8 WSW T in 0700 AM 12/12 COCORAHS

Mendham 3.2 NNW T in 0700 AM 12/12 COCORAHS

Chatham 0.6 NE T in 0700 AM 12/12 COCORAHS

...Passaic County...

Wayne 0.7 in 0530 PM 12/11 Public

...Somerset County...

Franklin Twp 3.4 NNW T in 0700 AM 12/12 COCORAHS

Bernards Twp 0.9 ENE T in 0700 AM 12/12 COCORAHS

Bernards Twp. T in 0715 AM 12/12 COCORAHS

...Sussex County...

Montague Twp 2.7 WNW 3.8 in 0700 AM 12/12 COCORAHS

Highland Lakes 1 SW 3.6 in 0820 AM 12/12 COOP

Sussex 1.3 N 3.4 in 0700 AM 12/12 COCORAHS

2 NNW Wantage Twp 3.1 in 0845 PM 12/11 Public

1 NNW Sussex 3.1 in 1035 PM 12/11 Public

Sparta Twp 3.6 SSW 3.0 in 0700 AM 12/12 COCORAHS

1 S High Point 3.0 in 0800 AM 12/12 Trained Spotter

1 ENE Hamburg 2.8 in 0600 AM 12/12 Trained Spotter

4 WSW Wantage Twp 2.7 in 0425 AM 12/12 Trained Spotter

Hampton Twp 2.5 in 0910 PM 12/11 Public

1 NW Sussex 2.3 in 0700 AM 12/12 CO-OP Observer

Hardyston Twp 3.2 SE 2.2 in 0730 AM 12/12 COCORAHS

Kittatinny Lake 2.1 in 0430 PM 12/11 Trained Spotter

4 WSW Wantage Twp 2.0 in 0700 PM 12/11 Trained Spotter

Newton 1.5 in 0415 PM 12/11 Public

...Union County...

Newark Airport 0.1 in 0700 AM 12/12 Official NWS Obs

...Warren County...

Blairstown Twp 2.2 ESE 2.4 in 0700 AM 12/12 COCORAHS

Marksboro 2.0 in 0430 PM 12/11 Trained Spotter

Blairstown Twp 2.4 E 1.8 in 0700 AM 12/12 COCORAHS

Great Meadows 0.6 in 0630 PM 12/11 Public

Hackettstown 0.2 in 0700 AM 12/12 COCORAHS

Greenwich Twp 1.6 S T in 0700 AM 12/12 COCORAHS

0.5 W Belvidere T in 0700 AM 12/12 COOP

3 W Holland Twp T in 0700 AM 12/12 CO-OP Observer

New York

...Bronx County...

1 NW Fordham 0.9 in 0600 AM 12/12 Public

...Nassau County...

Manhasset Hills 0.3 in 0800 AM 12/12 Public

...New York County...

Central Park T in 0700 AM 12/12 Official NWS Obs

...Orange County...

Walden 4.4 in 0940 PM 12/11 Public

2 WNW Monroe 4.0 in 1130 AM 12/11 Trained Spotter

2 SSW Stewart Airport 4.0 in 0155 AM 12/12 Public

Monroe 3.5 in 0520 AM 12/12 Trained Spotter

3 NNE Unionville 3.2 in 0936 PM 12/11 Public

Newburgh 3.0 in 0830 PM 12/11 Public

1 WNW Monroe 3.0 in 0920 PM 12/11 Trained Spotter

Middletown 2.0 in 0400 PM 12/11 Trained Spotter

Walden 1.9 in 0400 PM 12/11 CO-OP Observer

...Queens County...

NYC/La Guardia 0.4 in 0700 AM 12/12 Official NWS Obs

NYC/JFK T in 0700 AM 12/12 Official NWS Obs

...Rockland County...

Chestnut Ridge 2.1 in 1245 AM 12/12 Public

...Suffolk County...

North Babylon 0.4 in 0645 AM 12/12 Public

Islip Airport 0.4 in 0700 AM 12/12 Official NWS Obs

West Islip 0.3 in 0350 AM 12/12 Trained Spotter

Upton 0.3 in 0700 AM 12/12 Official NWS Obs

...Westchester County...

1 SW White Plains Airport 2.0 in 1030 PM 12/11 Trained Spotter

1 NW New Rochelle 1.1 in 0700 AM 12/12 Public

Mamaroneck 0.5 in 0920 PM 12/11 Trained Spotter

----------

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$150K-Plus Salaries For 2,556 NJ Superintendents, Principals

These school administrators make between $150K and $300K per year. See which leaders in your local school district made the list.NEW JERSEY — More than 2,500 educational administrators in the state made salaries of $150,000 or more during the past school year, according to data from the New Jersey Department of Education. Three were paid double, while 22 earned at least $250,000.Patch pulled salary data that includes superintendents, principals and other employees in administrative positions — down to assistant pr...

These school administrators make between $150K and $300K per year. See which leaders in your local school district made the list.

NEW JERSEY — More than 2,500 educational administrators in the state made salaries of $150,000 or more during the past school year, according to data from the New Jersey Department of Education. Three were paid double, while 22 earned at least $250,000.

Patch pulled salary data that includes superintendents, principals and other employees in administrative positions — down to assistant principals — within New Jersey schools. Out of roughly 8,400 people who fit the description, 2,556 of them made $150,000 or more.

It's becoming increasingly common for school administrators in New Jersey to make that much. In 2011, then-Gov. Chris Christie implemented a $175,000 cap for superintendents. The Christie administration raised their maximum base pay to $191,584 in 2017.

But Gov. Phil Murphy signed a law in 2019 that eliminates the cap for superintendent salaries but set guidelines for school-executive contracts to limit or standardize bonuses and other perks.

Some of the state's highest-paid superintendents — especially those in more affluent districts — received generous pay increases in the past year, according to analysis from NJ Advance Media. For instance, the salary for the superintendent of the 700-student Demarest district increased almost 50 percent, from $153,967 to $228,477. Millburn's superintendent went from a salary of $167,500 to $228,477, according to NJ Advance Media's report.

School-executive pay has long been a controversial subject in both local school district budgeting and state policy. While administrative salaries are often a flashpoint for criticism in school policy, many districts struggled to maintain experienced superintendents when the position's pay was capped, according to a 2019 analysis from NJ Spotlight.

Superintendents, principals and other school leaders throughout the nation have faced intense scrutiny for COVID-19 management and from politically charged movements to overhaul or eliminate certain subjects and topics from the curriculum. But those obstacles have also fallen to teachers and other rank-and-file school employees. And New Jersey has faced a shortage of teaching candidates that preceded the pandemic. Read more: Who Will Teach NJ's Kids After Mass Exodus From Education?

Here are New Jersey's highest-paid school administrators, along with their school, their district, their years of service and their salaries:

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Powerball Jackpot Up To $1.2 Billion, Doubling NJ's Lottery Record

The largest lottery jackpot prize in New Jersey history was worth $533 million. Someone in the Garden State could shatter that mark.NEW JERSEY — A Powerball ticket could land a New Jersey resident the largest lottery prize in state history. The jackpot soared to $1.2 billion for Wednesday night's drawing, approaching national records and more-than-doubling the Garden State's greatest lottery payout.The jackpot increased after nobody matched all six numbers in Monday night's drawing for a $999.3 million prize. The winnin...

The largest lottery jackpot prize in New Jersey history was worth $533 million. Someone in the Garden State could shatter that mark.

NEW JERSEY — A Powerball ticket could land a New Jersey resident the largest lottery prize in state history. The jackpot soared to $1.2 billion for Wednesday night's drawing, approaching national records and more-than-doubling the Garden State's greatest lottery payout.

The jackpot increased after nobody matched all six numbers in Monday night's drawing for a $999.3 million prize. The winning numbers were 13, 19, 36, 39, 59 and then a red power ball of 13.

Wednesday's drawing is at 10:59 p.m.

Lottery jackpots have skyrocketed in recent years, with gaming officials adjusting rules and ticket prices to pump up the top prizes. The most recent change came in August, when Powerball officials added an additional drawing day — going from two per week to three — to boost sales and build larger prizes.

If someone wins Wednesday's jackpot, they could receive the $1.2 billion through an annuity paid over 29 years. But most winners opt for cash, and the cash prize will total an estimated $596 billion for the next drawing.

Even the cash prize exceeds the largest lottery jackpot in New Jersey history, when a participant's ticket won a $533 million jackpot in 2018, according to lotto.com. The winner, Richard Wahl, took the cash option of $324 million before relocating to Florida. After federal and state taxes were removed, Wahl ended up with nearly $175 million.

But New Jerseyans will compete against Powerball players in 44 other states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Nobody has hit all six numbers since Aug. 3, with the Powerball going 38 draws without a jackpot winner. The odds of winning are 1 in 292.2 million. For perspective, the odds of being struck by lightning are less than 1 in 1 million, according to the CDC.

The largest lottery jackpot in U.S. history was a $1.586 billion prize. Three tickets — from California, Florida and Tennessee — earned won the jackpot in the Jan. 13, 2016, Powerball drawing. The massive Mega Million prize from earlier this year reached $1.337 billion when an Illinois ticketholder got lucky during July 29's contest.

Eleven New Jersey Lottery tickets generated at least $50,000 from Monday's drawing by matching four of the five white balls. Two of the tickets were purchased with Power Play, multiplying the prizes to $150,000. Here were New Jersey's biggest winners on Monday:

Overall, 263,914 New Jersey players won an estimated $1,445,317 in prizes ranging from $4 to $300.

The Associated Press contributed reporting.

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This Jersey Mine Is Home To An Actual Rainbow Tunnel, & You Can Tour It

Travelers with a love for unique attractions should check out this Jersey Mine, which is home to an actual rainbow tunnel. This mine underneath New Jersey is an exciting and unique mining experience that travelers who pass through the state are sure to enjoy.Sterling Hill Mining Museum is the perfect location for those who want to check out actual mining tunnels and see the equipment and how it was use...

Travelers with a love for unique attractions should check out this Jersey Mine, which is home to an actual rainbow tunnel. This mine underneath New Jersey is an exciting and unique mining experience that travelers who pass through the state are sure to enjoy.

Sterling Hill Mining Museum is the perfect location for those who want to check out actual mining tunnels and see the equipment and how it was used. These mines are also home to special events on holidays and their famous Rainbow Tunnel. This is a must-visit destination for some underground fun while learning a bit about the history of mining.

The Sterling Hill Mining Museum Invites Travelers To Its Haunted Mine

A post shared by Sterling Hill Mining Museum (@sterlinghillminingmuseum)

Sterling Mining Museum in New Jersey welcomes travelers this fall to check out their underground mine tour. During this tour, travelers will have the chance to check out two museums, see and experience the equipment inside the mine itself, watch a drilling and blasting demonstration, and see the incredibly famous fluorescent “Rainbow Tunnel”! These are just some of the incredible displays that travelers will discover at Sterling Hill Mining Museum. The tour is engaging for all ages and interests. They also offer special events that add an element to an experience at the mines.

Schedule For Weekend Tours Through The Mine

A post shared by Sterling Hill Mining Museum (@sterlinghillminingmuseum)

Sterling Hill Mining Museum offers weekend tours to travelers after Labor Day at 1 pm. Travelers should know that they can make reservations for tours between 10 am and 3 pm, but they must call them first; they do not make reservations online. Travelers should attempt to arrive thirty minutes, at the latest fifteen minutes, before their scheduled tour starts. The tours are not self-guided, and travelers will need a guide to enter the mines. Travelers should also note that it is a consistent 56?, so it is recommended that travelers bring a light jacket with them. There is also a gift shop on the grounds that is open from 10 am to 3 pm every day.

Sterling Hill Mining Museum offers its tours at reasonable prices. Here is a look at what it will cost travelers to take a tour of these spectacular mines.

Special Events This Fall At Sterling Hill Mining Museum

This fall, travelers have much to look forward to at Sterling Hill Mining Museum. With an abundance of special events, travelers are sure to find the event perfect for them at Sterling Hill Mining Museum.

Travelers can look forward to Sterling Hill Mining Museums' upcoming Veterans Day event on November 11, 2022, at 1 pm. Travelers who are veterans with valid military ID will be able to access the mines for free.

On November 25th, Sterling Hill Mining Museum is having a special Black Friday event. Travelers are invited to visit the mines to discover their Black Friday deal! Make sure to call for reservations.

How The Sterling Hill Mine Came To Be

The Sterling Hill Mine can trace its history back to the 1600s when copper and iron were sought after by early Dutch settlers. The sterling mine contains zinc minerals, though it was thought at the time of their origin that they contained iron and copper. In 1772 some ore was even sent to Wales to see if they could extract iron or copper.

The results were that neither could be attained from the rock. In1836, the zinc in the mine became more desirable, and several small companies began mining. The result was quite a few land disputes. It wasn’t until 1897 that the New Jersey Zinc Company consolidated the properties and began a major zinc extraction operation. The 35 miles worth of tunnels in the mine now stretch 2,675 feet below the surface.

Only the upper level is now available to travelers, as the rest has been flooded. The part that does not sit above the water table. The mine would eventually close due to the rising cost of production and falling prices of zinc. In 1989, Richard and Robert Hauck purchased the land, turning it into a museum. The brothers opened the museum in the early 1990s, and it has served the community as a nonprofit educational foundation ever since. It is now managed by its trustees and CEO, Bill Kroth.

The museum has added a few new exhibits since it opened. All of its exhibits attempt to fulfill the museum’s mission “to tell the story of Sterling Hill and to inspire learning about earth sciences, engineering, history and the responsible use of the Earth’s non-renewable resources.”

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