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At Denville Medical, we aim to serve you with long-lasting quality of life through personalized acupuncture treatments in New Jersey. The path to a pain-free life begins with a friendly, informative appointment, where one of our doctors develops a customized treatment plan tailored to your body's needs. It starts with your first evaluation, where our experts learn about your medical history, diagnostic tests, current condition, and overall health goals. From there, we'll create your plan and help you hit your milestones until your quality of life is improved.

With treatments like needling, cupping, Gua Sha, and acupuncture in Long Hill Township, NJ, included in your scope of treatment, musculoskeletal relief is right around the corner.

If you're sick and tired of living with painful limitations, our doctors are here to help you live a normal life free of debilitating body issues. No surgery. No addictive medicine. Only comprehensive acupuncture treatments, crafted with health and happiness in mind.

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Latest News in Long Hill Township, NJ

NJ Water May Taste, Smell Different For A Couple Months

NEW JERSEY — Tap water could taste and smell a bit different for millions of state residents in the coming months. New Jersey American Water will soon add chlorine to its supply as part of its annual-maintenance process.The company will temporarily change its water-treatment process from a chloramine (combined) residual to free chlorine residual at several of its treatment plants. The process will begin the week of Feb. 20 and last through the end of April, impacting many customers throughout North and Central Jersey. (S...

NEW JERSEY — Tap water could taste and smell a bit different for millions of state residents in the coming months. New Jersey American Water will soon add chlorine to its supply as part of its annual-maintenance process.

The company will temporarily change its water-treatment process from a chloramine (combined) residual to free chlorine residual at several of its treatment plants. The process will begin the week of Feb. 20 and last through the end of April, impacting many customers throughout North and Central Jersey. (See exactly where below.)

During that time, some may notice a "slight taste and smell" of chlorine in their water, says New Jersey American Water, which serves about 2.8 million people in the state. Those who wish to reduce the taste of chlorine can place water in an uncovered glass container in the refrigerator overnight to dissipate chlorine faster.

Find out what's happening in Across New Jerseywith free, real-time updates from Patch.

"This periodic, scheduled change in disinfectant is a standard water treatment practice that allows us to continue to provide safe, high-quality water for our customers," said Laura Norkute, the company's director of water quality. "We perform this distribution system maintenance program every year as an added measure of disinfection in our distribution system."

Most customers won't notice a change, New Jersey American Water says. The smell and taste will return to normal once the utility completes its system maintenance.

Find out what's happening in Across New Jerseywith free, real-time updates from Patch.

New Jersey American Water has used chloramines in its water-treatment process since the 1970s. In 2012, the company began using the substance to treat water in its coastal system, which serves customers throughout Monmouth and Ocean Counties.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency accepts chloramine as an effective treatment to prevent the waterborne transmission of parasites. One in five Americans receives drinking water from systems that administer the process, according to New Jersey American Water.

But kidney-dialysis patients and fish owners should take extra precautions, the company says. As with chlorine, chloramine must be removed from water used in the dialysis process. Dialysis systems already pre-treat their source water to remove chlorine, but some modifications may be necessary to remove chloramines. Find more info here.

Low levels of both chlorine and chloramine are toxic to aquatic life and must be removed from water they'll use. Fish owners should contact their local pet-supply store for assistance and recommended products. See more info.

Chloramine is safe for dogs, cats and birds.

The temporary change will impact the following communities (those with an asterisk purchase water from New Jersey American Water):

NJ township tears down partially built mansion after decade-long battle

CHERRY HILL, New Jersey (WPVI) -- A decade-long battle between a property owner and Cherry Hill Township may be coming to an end.The legal fight involves a massive 18,000-square-foot partially built mansion that was torn down Thursday morning.The Empire State building took a year to build. The Eiffel Tower took two years. And it took roughly seven years to build the Colosseum in Italy."My house will always be here. They're not going to tear down my property," Denise Williams told Action News in an exclusive int...

CHERRY HILL, New Jersey (WPVI) -- A decade-long battle between a property owner and Cherry Hill Township may be coming to an end.

The legal fight involves a massive 18,000-square-foot partially built mansion that was torn down Thursday morning.

The Empire State building took a year to build. The Eiffel Tower took two years. And it took roughly seven years to build the Colosseum in Italy.

"My house will always be here. They're not going to tear down my property," Denise Williams told Action News in an exclusive interview last week.

Her mega-mansion on Winding Drive in Cherry Hill has been under construction for nearly 14 years, and it still wasn't done. There were still no windows, no exterior finish and no basic components.

"It will be over my dead body before I allow the township to tear my property down," she said.

Construction came to a standstill about a decade ago. The 60-year-old blames the real estate market crash around 2010, troubles with contractors and harassment from neighbors and township officials for her construction woes.

"At every turn, the township, instead of working with me, have hindered my efforts," she said.

Cherry Hill Township Attorney William Cook disagrees.

"There has been no effort by Ms. Williams to present us with the necessary documentation that we need to approve further construction for this property," he said.

Cook said the building was unsafe and an eyesore in this wealthy enclave. He said after construction halted in 2012 and Williams' permit extensions expired at the end of 2015, she failed to submit proper architectural and engineering reports and new construction permit applications to meet new building codes.

"We have been more than fair to Ms. Williams in allowing her for well over 10 years to provide us with the necessary approvals for her to complete construction," he added.

Williams gave Action News her response.

"OK, what I say to that is that is just a regurgitation of lies," said Williams.

The battle has played out in the courts. The township said Williams' attempts to prevent demolition ultimately were denied.

And on Thursday, the township ripped down the home, demolishing what Williams says was an estimated million dollars in building costs.

Williams arrived on the scene in the middle of the demolition. She had 24-7 security on site, which did little to prevent the teardown.

The township told Action News the demolition cost $149,000 and it plans to put a lien on the property.

Williams told Action News that although they tore down her home they haven't torn down her resolve. She plans to sue to try and recover her building costs which are now just rubble.

High Levels Of Flooding, Residents Asked To Stay Home In Somerset Co.

Updated as of 10:25 p.m.SOMERSET COUNTY, NJ — Flooding continues to impact Somerset County on Monday with road closures, power outages, and school closures.Green Brook issued a State of Emergency for its town and closed all Township schools. Bernards Township's Oak Street school has a two-hour delayed opening due to a power loss.More than 2,000 residents are without power in Somerset County.PSE&G is reported 1,175 customers without power as of 10:15 a.m. with the majority in North Plainfield and...

Updated as of 10:25 p.m.

SOMERSET COUNTY, NJ — Flooding continues to impact Somerset County on Monday with road closures, power outages, and school closures.

Green Brook issued a State of Emergency for its town and closed all Township schools. Bernards Township's Oak Street school has a two-hour delayed opening due to a power loss.

More than 2,000 residents are without power in Somerset County.

PSE&G is reported 1,175 customers without power as of 10:15 a.m. with the majority in North Plainfield and Green Brook.

JCP&L is reporting 1,146 customers without power as of 10:15 a.m. in Bedminster, Bernards, Bernardsville, Hillsborough, Peapack and Gladstone.

"Due to high levels of flooding, residents are asked to avoid roads in the county and stay home if possible," said Somerset County Safety.

Authorities are also warning "Do not drive through flooded roadways!"

As of around 5 a.m. many areas in Somerset County have already received between 2 to 3 inches of rain overnight.

Take a look at the rain totals as of 5 a.m. from the NWS.

Bridgewater - 3.24 inchesHillsborough - 3.07 inchesGreen Brook - 3.04 inchesBranchburg - 2.95 inchesBedminster Township -2.84 inchesBelle Mead - 2.64 inchesSomerville - 2.62 inchesFar Hills - 2.54 inchesPottersville - 2.51 inchesSomerset - 2.27 inchesBlackwells Mills - 2.27 inches

And more rain is expected to fall Monday morning.

A flood watch has been issued for the area through 2 p.m. on Dec. 19 as rain continues to fall.

"Rainfall totals of 2.0 to 5.0 inches are expected, with the heaviest rain continuing for a time this morning," said the National Weather Service(NWS). "Flooding is ongoing in several areas given the excessive rainfall on already saturated ground. The steadiest rain this morning should end as some showers into this afternoon."

As a result, excessive runoff may cause flooding of rivers, creeks, streams, and other low-lying and flood-prone locations. Flooding may also occur in poor drainage and urban areas.

Due to flooding the following Somerset County parks are closed on Monday:

North Branch Raritan River at South Branch is at 11.46 feet as of 10 a.m. (major flooding stage).

The Millstone River at Griggstown is at 14.61 feet as of 10 a.m. (moderate flooding stage) just below major flooding at 15 feet.

Millstone River at Blackwells Mills is at 9.38 feet (near flooding stage) but projected to hit moderate flooding at 12.8 feet by 7 p.m. on Monday.

Continue to check back with Patch as this list is updated throughout the day.

Have a news tip? Email [email protected].

New Jersey American Water will resume using chloramines in water treatment starting April 18

New Jersey American Water will temporarily change their water treatment process to perform routine maintenance starting on April 18.New Jersey American Water says they will resume using chloramines in water treatment at its Raritan-Millstone and Canal Road Water Treatment plants. Parts of Essex, Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Somerset, Morris, and Union counties will be affected. The changeover is expected to last two months.The water services company says during the transition to free chlorine residual, some customers may notic...

New Jersey American Water will temporarily change their water treatment process to perform routine maintenance starting on April 18.

New Jersey American Water says they will resume using chloramines in water treatment at its Raritan-Millstone and Canal Road Water Treatment plants. Parts of Essex, Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Somerset, Morris, and Union counties will be affected. The changeover is expected to last two months.

The water services company says during the transition to free chlorine residual, some customers may notice a slight chlorine taste and odor in their water. With the resumption of the chloramine process, the taste and smell of chlorine will subside, the water services said.

RELATED: Here are 8 things you can do at home to protect your water

RELATED: New Jersey given $142 million for drinking water upgrades

In mid-February, as part of an annual routine maintenance program for its water distribution system, New Jersey American Water temporarily changed the water treatment process from a chloramine residual (a combined residual) to a free chlorine residual. The water services company says chloramines have long been an effective method of water disinfection that meets all EPA and NJDEP drinking water standards and have been used by New Jersey American Water since the 1980s.

(Communities with an asterisk purchase water from New Jersey American Water.)

Essex County: Irvington, Maplewood, Millburn

Hunterdon County: Flemington Borough*, Raritan Township, Readington Township, Tewksbury Township

Mercer County: Hopewell Borough*, Hopewell Township, Lawrence Township*, Princeton Borough, Princeton Junction, Princeton Township, Trenton*, West Windsor Township

Middlesex County: Cranbury Township, Dunellen Borough, Edison Township, Jamesburg Borough, Middlesex Borough, Monroe Township, North Brunswick*, Piscataway Township, Plainsboro Township, South Brunswick Township, South Plainfield Borough

Morris County: Chatham Township, Florham Park Borough, Long Hill Township, Mendham Township, Mendham Borough

Somerset County: Bedminster Township, Bernards Township, Bernardsville Borough, Bound Brook Borough, Branchburg Township, Bridgewater Township, Far Hills Borough, Franklin Township, Green Brook Township, Hillsborough Township, Manville Borough, Millstone Borough, Montgomery Township, North Plainfield Borough, Peapack & Gladstone Borough, Raritan Borough, Rocky Hill*, Somerville Borough, South Bound Brook Borough, Warren Township, Watchung Borough

Union County: Berkley Heights Township, City of Rahway*, Clark Township, Cranford Township, City of Elizabeth (Liberty)*, Fanwood Borough, Garwood Borough, Hillside Township, Kenilworth Borough, Linden City, Mountainside Borough, New Providence Borough, Plainfield City, Roselle Borough, Roselle Park Borough, Scotch Plains Township, Springfield Township, Summit, Union Township, Westfield Township, Winfield Park Township*

New Jersey American Water Completes Acquisition of Long Hill Township Sewer System

CAMDEN, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--New Jersey American Water today completed its acquisition of the sewer assets of the Township of Long Hill, N.J. for $12.7 million. This municipally owned sewer system ...

CAMDEN, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--New Jersey American Water today completed its acquisition of the sewer assets of the Township of Long Hill, N.J. for $12.7 million. This municipally owned sewer system serves approximately 2,800 customers, most of whom already receive water service from New Jersey American Water. The acquisition was approved by the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities on May 20, 2020.

“As Long Hill’s water company for more than 110 years, we are delighted to now also be the sewer service provider for this community”

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“As Long Hill’s water company for more than 110 years, we are delighted to now also be the sewer service provider for this community,” said Cheryl Norton, president of New Jersey American Water. “We look forward to getting started in making the needed improvements so that the community’s sewer service is as safe, reliable and affordable as the water service we provide.”

The agreement to purchase the sewer system was approved by voters in Long Hill Township by a two-to-one margin in a referendum held in November 2019. As part of the acquisition agreement, New Jersey American Water committed to invest more than $13 million in critical sewer system improvements in the next five years. These improvements include pump station upgrades, sewer main lining and replacements to reduce the infiltration of stormwater, and treatment plant upgrades to reduce and ultimately eliminate the release of partially treated wastewater during heavy rain events. Additionally, the company will coordinate sewer and water pipeline replacements with the Township’s road paving schedule to minimize disruption.

“Selling the system to New Jersey American Water is the best solution for our town,” said Brendan Rae, Mayor, Long Hill Township. “The proceeds from the sale will eliminate our debt, freeing up over $1 million in our annual budget, but more importantly we expand upon the partnership we have with New Jersey American Water. Fixing our troubled sewer system is of critical importance to the Township and I’m confident New Jersey American Water will do just that in a responsible, cost-effective manner.”

Residents will receive additional information in the mail from New Jersey American Water in the coming weeks. A new webpage, Long Hill Sewer, has also been created on the company’s website at www.newjerseyamwater.com, under Customer Service and Billing. New Jersey American Water will also hire five, full-time employees to operate the sewer system.

About New Jersey American Water

New Jersey American Water, a subsidiary of American Water (NYSE: AWK), is the largest investor-owned water utility in the state, providing high-quality and reliable water and/or wastewater services to approximately 2.8 million people. For more information, visit www.newjerseyamwater.com and follow New Jersey American Water on Twitter and Facebook.

About American Water

With a history dating back to 1886, American Water is the largest and most geographically diverse U.S. publicly traded water and wastewater utility company. The company employs more than 6,800 dedicated professionals who provide regulated and market-based drinking water, wastewater and other related services to more than 15 million people in 46 states. American Water provides safe, clean, affordable and reliable water services to our customers to make sure we keep their lives flowing. For more information, visit amwater.com and follow American Water on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

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